Dollar General And Dollar Tree Accounts

Topic 26248 | Page 1

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Cecelia 's Comment
member avatar

I'm on week 2 of truck driving school. We have had many company representatives/recruiters come talk to us. I was really considering Werner but the recruiter that was talking to me keeps trying to convince me to go to a Dollar Tree or Dollar General account in my area. I know they have OTR . My friend is considering DG or DT. Can you all attach the links or tell me why those accounts are bad, I know I've read it before on here.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Bad for a new driver. Very physical, lots of tight backing that can lead to accidents.

Next time you drive by any of those stores, picture getting in and out with a 53' trailer.

There is a much easier way to make money driving and lots less risk.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Recruiters try to sell dollar store accounts to new drivers because the noobs don't really know what they're getting into.

PackRat is right. You'll do a lot of very tight backing - not the best thing for brand new inexperienced drivers. Next you'll need to unload the freight out of the truck so the store can load their U-boat carts. After you're done, go to the next store and repeat. I've heard the word "gruelling" and "dollar store" used in the same sentence.

Needless to say, there's some driver turnover on the accounts. We recommend you take a pass. Start typing "dollar" into the search bar (the blank area just under the Trucking Truth title at the top) to see other discussions.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

These are obviously the lesser desired accounts - since they seem to be pushing them on folks that don't know any better.

As Errol & Packrat elaborate - they are usually very difficult to maneuver. Not something someone with little experience wants to take on if they don't have to.

PLUS they are typically HAND UNLOADS - which typically means you will be unpacking and rolling boxes down a ramp - very few of these stores (if any) have ACTUAL DOCKS. If the thought of handling every box on your truck is appealing - for most, it ISN'T. PLUS the amount of time spent hand-unloading, takes time away from DRIVING.

Go get some DRIVING EXPERIENCE (not loading experience) - then consider if you actually want to take this on.

Rick

midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

Not interested personally, but still curious if these accounts demanding physical unloading and better backing skills are also offering more money to make up the difference. Since they're economical stores I'm guessing not, but still curious.

Jeffrey D.'s Comment
member avatar

Let me tell you what I can from the viewpoint of a former Dollar General store manager. I've had drivers come in to deliver to my store and I have been their 3rd or 4th delivery that day and these folks WORK. Not only do you drive but you have to move dozens of rolltainers (think 600lb of freight in a steel cage on wheels) off your truck and roll them into the stockroom and DG policy is that the store employees are not allowed to assist the driver as they have their own responsibilities to do. I don't have any idea what they get paid but they definitely work their butts off.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Check out this Dollar general thread. 1 big difference is dollar general atleast when that post was made 4 years ago was all in carts. Dollar tree everything is hand unload using a roller system. Someone working the account at the time included examples of stores they delivered to.

ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

Hello Cecelia,

I will tell you that there is both good and bad to any of the "dollar" family accounts, whether its family dollar, DG or DT, etc.

First, I will tell you get as much time solo under your belt before you think about any of the dollar store accounts. As others have said, lots of backing, and lots of chances for accidents.

The good things are that the drivers are very well paid (better than $70k/yr, I new a driver who was on track to make over $85k/yr, but he hustled), its physical so you won't have to pay for a gym membership, you will have most weekends off (I would have if I stayed on the FD account I tried).

Some of the not so good things are that: it's physical and hard on the joints and muscles, you will have long days with several stops (2-3 minimum), it is all driver unload, lots of dollar stores are not very big truck friendly (think of the dollar stores you've been to) with basic loading docks (if they have one at all), and dealing with managers and staff that are working for minimum wage or a little more. Some are great to deliver to, others, not so much... Also, you may (and probably will on a regular basis) find yourself spending the night in a store parking lot because your hours ran out or were to short to get anywhere to park.

I guess the answer if they are good or bad is it is for you to decide, but I will say that what will make or break any experience for the driver (no matter what company they work for) is the relationship that you, as a driver, have with your fleet manager/dispatch manager/load manager & planner, along with the weekend/night dispatchers, and any other department you will deal with regularly. I had a manager/dispatcher on an account that never drove a truck, and just didn't really care about anything about his own backside, and wondered why the company lost that dedicated account. My other dedicated manager was great, had drove (and an O/O for over 20 years) and knew his drivers and who could get what done... He would pre-plan drivers a week ahead of time and tell us "go, get it done" and he took care of us with pay, miles, home time, and would go to bat for those of us who had proved ourselves.

Hope this helps. Chris

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
EricGuvNC's Comment
member avatar

Cecelia,

Not ONE DRIVER to now has mentioned working INSIDE 53' Trailers with NO A/C or HEAT. INSIDE Temps are much HOTTER in Summer, and Winter is Much COLDER, yet you'll also be Sweating in Winter.

Example: it's 112 degrees F. including humidity, in, say, FLORIDA, yet in the Trailer it'll be 125+ degrees F. and you're only at the 2nd of 5 stops and it's 10:30 a.m. There's NO VENTILATION in 53' Dry Van Trailers (even the so called "ventilated" trailers) and a fan at the back blows in about 3 feet and it's not close to you.

Sound like "a good time"?

If so, you're on the Right Track. If Not, Just Say NO!!

You'll have plenty of opportunities inside Trailers at MANY Shippers/Receivers to get a "feel for the environment".

This post has been for the BENEFIT of Cecelia......Thanks B-2-U-4 Your Time! CHEERS!!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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