The Life Of A Dedicated Driver

Topic 26673 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I think there is a lot of confusion concerning the terminologies we use in trucking. I see people in here wanting to find "regional" or "dedicated" driving jobs because they don't want to be "over the road" drivers, but oftentimes these jobs actually overlap each other. I have a dedicated position at Knight Transportation. It simply means that I am dedicated to serve one single customer - Hydro (formerly SAPA). It doesn't mean I have a dedicated route.

I also am somewhat of a "regional" driver. My region is rather large. It is basically East of the Rockies, but on occasion I will still get dispatched out West to places like Utah, Oregon, and California. It is not unusual for me to be in Miami, Florida one week, and then upstate New York the following week. I am still doing an "over the road" type job, but I am dedicated to one particular customer. My job is to move their products to their customers and serve them in any capacity that they need. In addition to that I am also "dedicated" to their particular manufacturing plant in Delhi, Louisiana. Most of my loads originate there and/or return me to that plant.

I thought I'd share with you my last few loads just to illustrate how my "dedicated" job works. Last weekend I was dispatched on a 1,562 mile load that originated in Delhi, Louisiana, then had four stops. Almost all my loads are multi-stop flatbed loads. This one had it's first stop in Riverdale, New Jersey, then proceeded to Farmington, Connecticut, Bristol, Connecticut, and Amesbury, Massachusetts. It had a pre-planned backhaul load with it where I picked up return materials in Amesbury, then made my way over to Buffalo, New York to pick up some equipment that was bound for the plant in Delhi. That added another 1,700 miles onto that weeks miles.

Now I am leaving Delhi in the morning on a 2,233 mile run with six stops on it. I will have my first stop in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Then I will proceed to De Smet, South Dakota, followed by three stops in Iowa - Pella, Dubuque, and Cherokee. From there I go to my final in Wausau, Wisconsin. This load also has a pre-planned backhaul load. It will have me going from Wausau down to Muscatine, Iowa to pick up some return materials headed to Delhi, Louisiana - that's an additional 1,137 miles. If you are keeping up with the numbers you will have figured out that's a total of 6,632 miles in two weeks.

That's some very typical stuff for me. I hope I haven't bored you. I just thought maybe some of you might benefit from seeing what a dedicated driver does regularly. I love the over the road lifestyle. It's full of adventure and never ending variety. You can be a regional or dedicated driver and still turn lots of miles while filling your hunger for adventure also.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Joel D.'s Comment
member avatar

Not bored me at all. On the contrary, I find it very interesting what you and guys like you do for a living. And like you say regional can mean doing many miles almost as if you were doing otr. Just maybe in a shorter time frame.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar
It had a pre-planned backhaul load with it where I picked up return materials in Amesbury, then made my way over to Buffalo, New York to pick up some equipment that was bound for the plant in Delhi.

I see the term backhaul used a lot. Does it just mean a loan returning to your original shipper?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Those are some great miles!

Rob D says

I see the term backhaul used a lot. Does it just mean a loan returning to your original shipper?

most of the time yes, it could also be referring to a load going in the same direction that gets you close to terminal/ starting point which will help pay for the fuel rather than sending you a few hundred miles empty.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar
most of the time yes, it could also be referring to a load going in the same direction that gets you close to terminal/ starting point which will help pay for the fuel rather than sending you a few hundred miles empty.

Thank Rob T.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

I have noticed different definitions of those same terms as well. I'm home every weekend friday night and leave monday morning, plus three nights during the week. Sometimes I'm gone all week and sometimes I'm home every night of the week.

The photo below shows my region. The green with a white box are dealerships that we deliver to. The gold stars are hotels that accept CLC and have truck parking. The hearts are locations that I load out of.

You can't see some of the locations that I load because of the cluster I have created on Google maps unless I zoom in. My home terminal is Nashville, TN. Other locations are Spring Hill, TN, Princeton, IN, and Georgetown, KY. We have terminals in Louisiana and Texas as well. I do not make it to all of our terminals because I'm satisfied with the area I run for the money and home time. Hope this helps somebody out there.

0378857001569759504.jpg

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Not bored me at all. On the contrary, I find it very interesting what you and guys like you do for a living. And like you say regional can mean doing many miles almost as if you were doing otr. Just maybe in a shorter time frame.

I am regional, but I run from eastern Ohio to Maine to Philadelphia and as Far East as Rhode Island and Boston. So far. I also run to Wisconsin at least once a quarter

I could be dispatched anywhere they need me, since I made it clear I don’t really need to be home any particular time. If I have specific dates I need to be home, they get me there. For instance, I need to be home Wednesday to play in a playoff for the grand prize for the blackjack tournament I won. Then I will head back out until the week of 10/13, take a week off with my wife, then my plan is to head out for 2 weeks to make up for my unpaid vacation.

.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Highwayman's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Old School. That was a very helpful post. So I'm guessing that a regional or dedicated job that involves weekly home time is probably going to generally have a smaller geographic area and shorter length of haul? And probably lower potential miles as well? Those are some great miles you are able to run. I would love to hear the details of some of the trip planning that helps make that happen.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Red Beard 's Comment
member avatar

Nothing to disagree with here. I believe the companies have skewed the proper use of the words "dedicated" and "regional" obviously as a recruiting tool for new drivers. I was on a "dedicated" route in Missouri for 6 months. In that time frame I drove to Maine, Florida to California and back; probably twice if I think about it. Dedicated means nothing more than what's already been covered here already. Regional might mean the 48 contiguous to the boss of the company. Be sure to ask specific questions if you have needs. Don't assume anything.

Great post Old School.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

“Dedicated”...means Dedicated to one customer/account. I’d strongly suggest each Dedicated Account is unique.

I am committed to Walmart Dedicated, yet my job is very different than Old School’s SAPA Account.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More