Advice On Hauling Gasoline

Topic 26789 | Page 1

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Barry K.'s Comment
member avatar

I recently acquired my CDL and I'm considering a job hauling gasoline and would just appreciate any insights into what to expect or would drivers with experience in this area recommend something else for a new driver. Thanks in advance!

BK

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the Trucking Truth site!

We never recommend pulling tank trailers for a brand new driver. Too much of a learning curve for a new guy that is already green and knows next to nothing about handling a 75' combination vehicle at 80,000 lbs.

Why are you interested in these to start your driving?

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Personally I would not advise starting with fuel tanker in addition to what Mr. Packrat said if you have to make deliveries a lot of gas stations are tight and would require tight maneuvers in crowded areas.

Better to get some experience for a year or two before attempting it

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

I would question a company willing to put a newbie in such a position

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I recently acquired my CDL and I'm considering a job hauling gasoline and would just appreciate any insights into what to expect or would drivers with experience in this area recommend something else for a new driver.

Hello Barry, and welcome to our forum!

Hauling a tanker involves a lot of additional issues. We never recommend it for rookie drivers. Gasoline just adds to the complications and dangers. I would seriously like to know what kind of company is willing to hire an inexperienced driver for this job. That is really surprising to me.

We had a long time member here who wanted to deliver fuel. He had to get several years of experience just to be eligible for hire. Then once he got his dream job he hated it. You don't even realize what you don't know yet. That was Daniel's problem. There were issues with the job he had never dreamed of. Things like crazy drivers at the places he was delivering to, and drunks walking up to him smoking a cigarette while he's unloading! After one of his co-workers got killed in an explosion he decided to quit. He's now working for Old Dominion.

Here's a link to an informative article that might help you understand our concerns with this as your start into this challenging career. Take the time to read it - I think you'll find it helpful.

The Lack Of Prudence In Rookie Drivers

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Barry everybody gave you excellent advice. If you dont mind me asking what is it about fuel delivery that interests you? Most times you wont make any more money than somebody hauling a flatbed or van. So many people believe (as I did) that as a company driver you make substantially more for hazmat or fuel but it ends up paying about the same.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Barry K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the (unanimous) feedback. I was checking job postings in Charlotte, NC, a city I am considering moving back to and found the fuel hauling job with Speedway. But I value the feedback and will look at other opportunities. Thanks again all!

Barry K.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the (unanimous) feedback. I was checking job postings in Charlotte, NC, a city I am considering moving back to and found the fuel hauling job with Speedway. But I value the feedback and will look at other opportunities. Thanks again all!

Barry K.

Millis is near Charlotte, might be a good fit.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Millis has a terminal in Eden, NC. They also train student drivers there.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Barry I drove fuel and chemical tankers. If I hadn't gotten in a motorcycle accident 9 years ago, I probably would be still doing it. But no way should any newbies be dri ing fuel tankers. I started out doing ag hauling. After a couple of years my safety manager came up to me and ask if I would be willing to train on chemical tankers. I asked do we get paid during training? He said of course. So I did it for 4 years and then I didn't want the drive to go to work and then drive for 12 hours. So I found a job doing fuel tankers. Then the accident. I was out for 9 years because of a cage couldn't keep his noise out of his phone. I just came back to work in December. I don't care good you think you can do it, you're too green. And any company that would hire you before you have had at least 2 years OTR is either desperate or foolish to hire you or both. This is not an easy go and as Rob D said you might break even doing either dry van or reefer. And get some experience before you jump at this. This is one former fuel tanker driver giving you the up front scoop.

Raptor

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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