Question Should I Train On Manuals Or Automatics

Topic 26852 | Page 2

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Jay F.'s Comment
member avatar

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Thanks for the replies. I’ve driven manual cars all my life, but the whole double clutching sounds scary. I’m sure I could do it. The instructor made it seem much harder

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It's not scary. It's more that you need to develop coordination of the pat your head/rub your belly kind. Thousands of Trucking students learn it every year. You can be one of them

I'll repeat my suggestion: I vote for automatic, your career will do well in spite of the restriction.

Your advice was almost word for word the advice of the instructor. To me it makes the most sense. Thank you

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Wild-Bill's Comment
member avatar

Ok, let me start by saying I’m new to this game and don’t know anything about anything. But, I’ve seen several job postings locally that say you must be able to drive a manual. So, even though you will likely end up in an automatic with a mega carrier or even mid sized carrier. Why not learn manual? You can always drive an automatic if your trained on a manual. You can’t do the opposite though. One of the many reasons I’m leaning toward one company over others is that they train on a 10 speed manual. It’s not a huge factor, but, it’s a factor.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

Here's my question. It has been said many times on this forum now to include this post that go automatic now and you can train manual later. Is that a forsure thing? Has anybody on this forum done that? I'm honestly just curious. I feel that would be a pita both the company and the driver to taken you off the road, have you trained on a manual than put back in your auto.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I ran into a situation at a terminal I worked out of. Their road trucks were largely auto’s. Their day cabs were manuals. A few times a road truck broke down while under a load and all they had available were day cab’s. The driver had an auto only restriction. They really scrambled to get the loads delivered on time because the driver could not drive the daycab. Doesn’t happen everyday, but you never want to back yourself into a corner.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Here's my question. It has been said many times on this forum now to include this post that go automatic now and you can train manual later. Is that a forsure thing? Has anybody on this forum done that? I'm honestly just curious. I feel that would be a pita both the company and the driver to taken you off the road, have you trained on a manual than put back in your auto.

When I was doing foodservice we had a guy come to us from Pepsi with the restriction. They put him into a manual during his training period which was ok due to his trainer having a CDL without it so he was able to learn. The way he got rid of it was retaking the driving portion of the CDL in a manual transmission truck. He spent I believe $600 for a 1 day CDL program that gave him 2 hours of practice getting accustomed to that specific truck and then went to the test site.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

@ Jay:

It's not scary. It's more that you need to develop coordination of the pat your head/rub your belly kind.
Your advice was almost word for word the advice of the instructor.

It's about trying to learn two things (driving and shifting) at once. What else? "Walk and chew gum"?

@ Bird-one:

Here's my question. It has been said many times on this forum now to include this post that go automatic now and you can train manual later. Is that a forsure thing?

I hinted just above for Jay. The first time out you are learning two complicated things at once. One idea is to learn to pull that trailer around and get your CDL. Once you have your license and don't have to worry about running over things with the tandems , then you can focus on double clutching. just an idea.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

I understand Errol. I guess what I'm asking is if I'm a current Swift driver and I tell my dispatcher i want the auto restriction removed, what will be the process for that?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I understand Errol. I guess what I'm asking is if I'm a current Swift driver and I tell my dispatcher i want the auto restriction removed, what will be the process for that?

I started out at Swift. Probably what you said (Your DM) is the place to start.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I ran into a situation at a terminal I worked out of. Their road trucks were largely auto’s. Their day cabs were manuals. A few times a road truck broke down while under a load and all they had available were day cab’s. The driver had an auto only restriction. They really scrambled to get the loads delivered on time because the driver could not drive the daycab. Doesn’t happen everyday, but you never want to back yourself into a corner.

That was exactly my point, too.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

Errol,

Before the auto trans. starting showing up all drivers had to learn the job and the manual shifting and we all survived for the most part. I just feel that without the auto only on your license you are able to handle either but with it you are trapped or have to cough up extra money and time to have it removed. Maybe everyone who obtains any driver license including 4 wheelers should have the same restriction? Just a thought.

Rob T.,

My point exactly. It was a possibility that the company could have just sent him home because he wasn't qualified to drive the equipment available. It also could affect your earning between daytime locals or OTR job assignments.

Packrat, You are always so right on the subject.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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