Work Boots Or No Work Boots During Otr Training??

Topic 26979 | Page 2

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Michael W.'s Comment
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Get a decent pair of boots, I like the Wellingtons, slip on. I have a pair of Wellington insulated Carharrts that are very comfortable. https://www.cabelas.com/product/CARHARTT-MN-SOFT-TOE-DS/1940665.uts?productVariantId=4078726&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=04084019&rid=20&ds_rl=1246522&ds_rl=1246585&ds_rl=1246588&ds_rl=1252079&gclid=Cj0KCQiAno_uBRC1ARIsAB496IVkPH6ei6zcFShz5GWcoqOdZADhGfAj9k90QVaDKKmeb8BUnlBG7zkaAgNdEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

There are also western style work boots, like seen here, I have a pair of the Twisted X... Very nice boots, and very comfortable, wearing them right now. https://www.bootbarn.com/workwear/work-boots/mens-pull-on-boots/

Depending on where you are working, I also throw a pair of Muck brand boots in the truck too... Sometimes they are required if you get into some dirt yards after a snow melt or heavy rain. You roll the tops of the boot shaft down, you can slip right in and out of them that way, love these boots when they are needed, which is quite often in the winter if you go to a variety of places. https://www.amazon.com/Muck-Chore-Classic-Rubber-Womens/dp/B000WG7***?ref_=ast_sto_dp

I wear tennis shoes too, usually drive in those, and I would never go barefoot or wear socks, that is insane and unprofessional, just as driving with your feet on the dash is. See that all the time out here, feet on dash, barefoot, flip flops and pajamas cruising down the road and texting... Ridiculous, very sad state this industry is in, very little if any professionalism or basic etiquette out here any longer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

I bought a pair of these for those times when I don't really need to full steel toe work book but the customer says "you can't come in here without steel toe shoes."

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
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Https://oakbayonline.com/collections/frontpage/products/safety-work-shoes

Amber L.'s Comment
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Thanks everyone for the responses!

It sounds like the consensus is a pair of work boots is well worth the space even when you are in your trainer truck! And several pairs can be handy for there on out! 😁

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I have 3 pair of MACV boots from goruck.com I bought 2 and they sent me one under warranty.

Most comfortable boots I’ve ever had. Light as a sneaker. Awesome warranty. Lifetime, replace or repair, no questions asked. The sole of one started to separate at the heel. Sent them a picture and they sent a new pair, no questions asked. 25% off I believe for vets, 35% on Veterans Day according to their site.

Big T's Comment
member avatar

I wear a pair of $50 insulated waterproof work boots from Walmart during the winter. Get caught in the cold with tennis shoes and you may regret it.

If I'm packing light the boots are coming and tennis shoes, flip flops etc. are staying.

But I am also the jerk mentor that doesn't allow flip flops, sandals, or open toed shoes to be worn on the truck while on duty and you don't get out of my truck in them period. I've seen what that leg grater can do in person.

Brandon K.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm getting ready to leave for training at Roehl in Gary. I'm going into the national flatbed fleet so I bought a pair of Carolina Logger Steel Toe Boots. I found them on sale. They have aggressive tread and will provide ankle support. I've also rubbed them down with mink oil to water proof them.

I live down the road from a Flying J and often see drivers in gym shorts and flip flops walking around the truck parking. I've always thought it looked unprofessional.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
They have aggressive tread

Aggressive tread may help you walk through the mud, but it won't give you traction on a frozen flatbed, greasy warehouse floor, or while climbing up on a lumber load. Thats where you need it most. Non-skid, oil and slip resistant soles are your safest option.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

I bought boots for flatbed and wore them a few times. I prefer a hiking shoe. Now I just wear tennis shoes but I do a lot of walking and on pavement only. I'd say bring boots for sure and decide what is best for you when you have a little more experience. You will see people with all kinds of different foot wear out here and all kinds of opinions about it.

Brandon K.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

They have aggressive tread

double-quotes-end.png

Aggressive tread may help you walk through the mud, but it won't give you traction on a frozen flatbed, greasy warehouse floor, or while climbing up on a lumber load. Thats where you need it most. Non-skid, oil and slip resistant soles are your safest option.

I didnt even think about oil and ice. I'm now thinking of buying some slip on ice grips for now because I've already spent a lot of money getting ready. Hopefully it will help with the ice bed. The next pair will take that in to consideration. Thanks Turtle!

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