Reassigned To Older Truck

Topic 27380 | Page 1

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JCTrucker's Comment
member avatar

Just curious how everyone here would handle this situation.

New CDL driver (6 months). Training completed with new company. Things cruising along great . . . Get assigned a new-ish truck, good routes, good communication, good money, no problems, no disciplinary anything. Then . . . .

Out of the blue, get a call that new company trainers need a truck with a bunk in it. So they are taking mine. And I get reassigned to a 6 yr old truck.

Further info . . . the older trucks almost never meet the minimum requirements for the MPG bonus. Which basically means I am out $3-400 per month. Which is just adding insult to injury.

Should I: Call my manager for explanation? Quit? Take it and keep trucking? Take it and ensure that management is aware of my displeasure and reasons behind it? Other ideas?

I'm not a whiner. I'm a solid employee. I don't feel its right for a company to punish good employees for their benefit. I believe in win-wins. This is definitely not that.

Thanks for your thoughts and insights.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Take it and keep trucking.

Show that you are a team player by taking the hit for the greater good of the team.

It's a business decision, nothing more. Businesses need to keep their assets where they are needed most. Unfortunately, someone has to draw the short end of the stick. Today it's your turn.

Focus on being the best driver that old truck has ever had behind it's wheel. Save some fuel, be safe and productive, show what you can do in an old truck. Do it with a smile and without complaint. You may be next in line for a brand new truck. You never know.

JCTrucker's Comment
member avatar

Thanks, Turtle.

As angry as I am, I hate to admit it but I tend to agree with your view.

I won't be in line for a new truck for years, though.

I'm getting a lot of benefits from this company and don't want to burn the bridge. Or bite the hand that feeds me.

At the same time, I think it shows poor business decisions, a lack of loyalty, and short term vision. Those things bother me for the long term vision of my employment with them. Gotta admit . . . HUGE hit to be taken without any promise of "returning the favor" or "will keep an eye out for something good for you."

I've had to deliver hard decisions to good people. I have ALWAYS guaranteed them top priority for anything good that comes across my desk. And have delivered on that promise too. Not getting any kind of consideration such as that tends to make me reconsider my position with the company. Not going to do anything rash but will not be a long term player for them. Gonna pay my dues and when I reevaluate my career, I can guarantee that this will weigh HEAVILY on my future decisions.

Thanks for the sanity check, though. Much appreciated.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

As hard as it may seem, you can't take it personal. I had the same thing happen to me once. I was in a really nice truck, but it needed a major repair. The company sent me on a bus to another terminal to start driving a truck that was sitting vacant. It was an old nag that smelled a lot like a nasty wet dog.

They gave my other truck to someone who just finished orientation and I was stuck with "Old Nasty" - my pet name for that thing. I couldn't believe it, but I just decided I was gonna show that old relic how you make money at this. I didn't complain, I just busted my tail.

About six months went by and one day as I pulled into one of our terminals the guard told me, "Man, it's a good thing you showed up. I've been told to stop you if I see this truck number. Your truck has been sold! Clean it out and go see Robert, he will get you set up with a new one."

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Heres the flip side... you are a trainer for x number of years and your truck dies. You need a truck so you can train and create other safe, revenue producing drivers. You are accident free with no lateness, but a brand new driver of 6 mos thinks he is entitled to keep a truck you need.

The company remains loyal to this driver, because to them... even at 6 mos your commitment to the company is still up for debate.

They cant promise you a truck they dont have cause if they did and didnt get it by that time, then you would feel lied to. Just gently remind your manager in a couple months that you hope for a newer truck.

BTW.... my friend drove a brand new truck at Prime and switched companies... with 3 years experience she is driving a 2012. Older trucks are not unheard of for even experienced drivers. Companies see them as money makers, not comfortable homes... despite how we feel. And who knows.... your manager may be able to offset some of that loss with "perks" ie extram hometime or layover pay etc.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I have terrible luck when it comes to my assigned trucks, I get one I like for a few weeks and it gets sent to another terminal or something else happens and ots gone for what ever reason.

But in my opinion the truck has the company name on the door not mine, so as long as I have something to drive it doesnt really matter. I've driven trucks with less than 20 miles all the way up to 900k miles and they all pay the same.

Remember trainers no matter the company always get priority when it comes to truck assignments.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

JCTrucker's Comment
member avatar

Kearsey,

I hear you. If this was a mom and pop shop, no doubt there would be that need to keep the trainer running to keep the doors open. That ain't the case here. 160 or so new trucks coming into the company per year, minimum. 1200+ drivers. And to be honest, the DID promise me a truck. The one I'm in. I totally expect and would demand loyalty from ANY company (as long as no wrongdoing) as a multiyear employee vs a 6 month chump. I'm realistic.

Just seems that making a new employee take a step back due to no fault of their own in order to benefit themselves while offering nothing to the new guy is a . . . well, it's bad business in my opinion.

I'm over it, gonna take my lumps as a new-bie, will move on when the time is right. Now ain't it. I'll make money for the company, for myself, and hopefully, for the customer.

Steppenwolf 's Comment
member avatar

Yep...roll with it... I got an older truck 2018 after training in a 2020...you know what...I like the older truck better... Has a few little quirks but is in decent shape and runs really well... That is what is making me money out here. I have 8 weeks in and 15000 miles over half of those in the old truck... Long as your running let it roll off your back. No fuel bonus squeeze in an extra load...just saying Be safe

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
making a new employee take a step back due to no fault of their own in order to benefit themselves while offering nothing to the new guy is a . . . well, it's bad business in my opinion.

First of all, if the company doesn't do what they must to keep their operations productive and efficient they won't be around to allow you to make a living.

How do you know that wasn't the best option they had available? You act like they're in the war room going, "How can we insult and aggravate this new guy? I know, let's put him in a lousy truck!" Of course not. That was likely the best option they had available at the moment. I'm sure the problem they were facing was no fault of their own. They did the best they could with it.

You think that's a bad business move because after being there a few months you'd like to be the center of their universe. You'd like them to value you so highly that they would never do anything that might upset you. I'm afraid those are not reasonable expectations, especially for a rookie driver. You must put in your time and pay your dues. What do you think, "paying your dues" might mean? I would say this is the perfect example of it.

Roll with it. Don't upset or distract yourself with conspiracy theories, fantasies of sticking it to them, or going to work for another company. Instead, focus on being the best driver they've ever had. Be on time, productive, efficient, and professional in every way. Someday you might become one of their top tier drivers and they'll treat you like the center of their universe. But you haven't earned that yet, and no one gives that status away.

Be awesome. That's how you move up the ladder in life.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Don's Comment
member avatar

This has happened to me also. I'll be in a great tractor, then out of the blue it is gone. When I ask what happened to it, I am told "It was taken to IP- Streetsboro, or PCA Ashland. In it's place, IP-Wooster gets "Old Betsy" who has seen it's better days. As long as "Old Betsy" gets me from A to B, doesn't break down and will pass ODOT, etc., then I am good to go. Admittedly, I have not had any major issues on any tractor I have been assigned. Some of the company tractors could be older, but they are maintained well. Now, if I could say the same about our trailers!

I have terrible luck when it comes to my assigned trucks, I get one I like for a few weeks and it gets sent to another terminal or something else happens and ots gone for what ever reason.

But in my opinion the truck has the company name on the door not mine, so as long as I have something to drive it doesnt really matter. I've driven trucks with less than 20 miles all the way up to 900k miles and they all pay the same.

Remember trainers no matter the company always get priority when it comes to truck assignments.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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