Does Anybody Here Haul Gas/fuel?

Topic 27708 | Page 1

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Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

I’ve been OTR with Roehl for the past 20 months and while I’ve excelled at it and became a driver trainer it’s time to be at home since I’ve got a wife and two small children. I want to be a part of their lives growing up. I’ve looked into hauling gas locally and just want to know if anybody here does it and what their experiences are. I have an interview at a KAG terminal with the manager. I don’t need any experience hauling gas they’ll train me to do it. How dangerous is it? What are your experiences with it? People need gas to drive so it must be consistent work year round. Thanks in advance for any advice.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Moderator Daniel B. did this for awhile, but he seldom stops by anymore.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

PJ hauls a chemical tanker, but that's a little different.

How dangerous is it? Quite, if proper cautions aren't taken. There's decent money in it from what I gather, and yeah it's probably stable work.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Andrew, Daniel B and I talked a few times when he was hauling gasoline. That was something he had always wanted to do. He considered it his dream job all during the time he was OTR as a reefer driver. Once he started doing it he was ecstatic. Not long after the honeymoon, his dream turned into his nightmare.

He didn't like working nights, which is where he ended up as the new guy. He didn't like the really tight situations of getting in and out at the convenience stores where he delivered. He was always being approached by what he called "crack-heads" begging for money. He said while he'd be unloading and releasing all kinds of fuel vapors into the immediate area, they'd walk right up to him smoking a cigarette - you can imagine the anxiety that caused!

His final straw was when one of his co-workers was killed in an explosion resulting from a roll-over accident. He now does P&D work for Old Dominion and absolutely loves it. Have you considered P&D or linehaul work? Both can have you home daily with very generous pay.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I have looked into it in the past, but what I found was the money was not there, at least in my area. Ga/SC. My worst weeks hauling chemicals would be the norm. The particular company I checked into also had split days off for some reason.

Tanks are dangerous no matter what is in them.

Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the thoughts old school. One of my biggest fears isn’t necessarily rolling it but the crack heads and rif raf at these gas stations overnight. It would be in Indianapolis and the crime in that city is getting out of control. I spoke to the terminal manager and he said they haven’t had any issues. I hope he’s telling the truth. They did say the money is good 78-88k a year. Paid by the load and hourly on top of it.

Andrew, Daniel B and I talked a few times when he was hauling gasoline. That was something he had always wanted to do. He considered it his dream job all during the time he was OTR as a reefer driver. Once he started doing it he was ecstatic. Not long after the honeymoon, his dream turned into his nightmare.

He didn't like working nights, which is where he ended up as the new guy. He didn't like the really tight situations of getting in and out at the convenience stores where he delivered. He was always being approached by what he called "crack-heads" begging for money. He said while he'd be unloading and releasing all kinds of fuel vapors into the immediate area, they'd walk right up to him smoking a cigarette - you can imagine the anxiety that caused!

His final straw was when one of his co-workers was killed in an explosion resulting from a roll-over accident. He now does P&D work for Old Dominion and absolutely loves it. Have you considered P&D or linehaul work? Both can have you home daily with very generous pay.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Andrew KAG is a good outfit. I have met many of their drivers. They are into all sorts of liquid hauling. The company I spoke with at home was about 48k a year.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
They did say the money is good 78-88k a year. Paid by the load and hourly on top of it.

You can make about that much doing P&D for a LTL company. If you dont mind working nights for awhile and do linehaul you can be over 100k in a couple years, while getting 2 days off a week and not have to mess with crack heads or tankers.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I’ve looked into hauling gas locally and just want to know if anybody here does it and what their experiences are.

Ive done it for the last six months and love it.

Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

Andhe78 what do you love about it?

double-quotes-start.png

I’ve looked into hauling gas locally and just want to know if anybody here does it and what their experiences are.

double-quotes-end.png

Ive done it for the last six months and love it.

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