Right Turns: "Jug Handle" Or "Buttonhook"?

Topic 27713 | Page 1

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Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

WI CDL manual is very clear... they approve of the Jug handle (picture on left). Schneider, based in Green Bay, teaches and even more extreme version of the one on the right!

What say you all?

0226478001582909285.jpg

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

I do whatever I got to do to make the turn. The main thing to worry about is if the turn is the right turn. Last thing you want to do is do some crazy maneuvering just to end up at a dead end or a 5 ton road with a covered bridge up a head.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Ideally you're going to do the one on the left but that's not always possible. The problem with doing the one on the right is the possibility of a vehicle squeezing in there and ripping their front end off. However, sometimes that's the only way you'll make a right turn. Sometimes a car will be waiting at a light or you'll have a raised median with a sign that prevents you from doing the one on left. As you gain experience you'll be able to assess what your best option is as you approach your turn based on available space and traffic volume. I have noticed atleast in the areas I drive that cars are stopping farther back if they see I have my turn signal on to give me additional room. I'm spoiled though and don't deal with Chicago or the Northeast smile.gif

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Some of the towns we have to go through requires us to do button hook, regardless of what the manual said. Just like when I was making the deliveries to Walmart in Omaha, NE, some of those turns would be impossible to make without doing the button hook since the road you're turning on is to small with a lot of traffic, so you cannot simply wait for an opening such as turning on red as I have done sometimes in other places.

The manual says a lot of things that doesn't apply to real world events.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar
The problem with doing the one on the right is the possibility of a vehicle squeezing in there and ripping their front end off.

That's why it's very important to watch your mirrors, especially during turns. I have never had a car try that on me, but I would be ready to stop if the time ever comes.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

What they're teaching is a nice theory, but it doesn't always work well in practice. There are many variables to consider.

Often the road you're turning onto will have traffic stopped at the traffic light. If you make the turn the way they suggest you'll force a dozen or more vehicles to back up in order to get out of your way.

If instead, you do it the way they say is incorrect you'll be able to complete the turn smoothly and safely without having to stop or force anyone to back up or clear out of your way.

Every situation is unique. There is no perfect way to make every turn. I disagree with their labeling of "correct" and "incorrect". The second version is not incorrect. In fact, it's often the safer and more practical way to do it.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I've done both, I tried the first one once and screwed it up since I didn't have as much room as I initially thought. So I had have 3 cars back up so I could finish my turn without knocking down a light pole.

After you gain some experience you will be able to read the intersections as you approach and know what kind of turn to make, some of which would be considered "incorrect" in the CDL manual.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Marc here is a street view of a store I needed to get into yesterday

0783507001583180877.jpg I got to this store around 830am on a sunday. There were quite a few cars waiting to turn left out of there (like the red pickup), and a couple waiting to turn right. As I was approaching to turn right to go on the road in front of the store I assessed the situation and the best option was to move over (when clear of course) to swing left taking both lanes on my side of the median to make the right turn. There is no way I could stay in the right lane and turn into the single lane my side would have. The biggest thing you need to remember is signal your intentions and watch those mirrors. I've been to this store about 2am before and was able to do the "correct" way.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I do right buttonhooks all the time, and sometimes even a left buttonhook.

I was told by my company’s training department on their road test that legally you can use the entire roadway if required for a turn. So I use whatever I need. And many times I have had to combine a buttonhook and a jug handle, and once used 3 lanes of my side and two of the other side and STILL had to go over the curb.

If you know you are going to have to do a buttonhook at a light, when approaching start about the length of a pickup or maybe slightly more, swing your cab into the other lane to block it and set up for your turn, after checking your mirrors of course. That should leave your trailer blocking anyone from pulling beside you and the truck set up for the turn. Keep watching your tandems all the way through the turn. If you need to use the other oncoming lanes as well, then do it. If traffic is there, stop and wait. You have to do whatever you have to do to make the turn without hitting anything. Ignore people blowing horns. They will get over it.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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