How Important Is 2 Week Notice In The Industry?

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James M.'s Comment
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I just accepted a local position at another company and I'm supposed to start mid December. I'm currently on the road with home time scheduled for the 6th. I'm supposed to start the new job on the 16th.

I'm worried that if I put my notice in they'll tell me to turn the truck in before I can get home and unload my stuff and would have to leave most of it behind.

I also need a couple days before the job to do prehire drug screen and orientation classes.

If I come out of home time and say I would like to turn my truck in will this negatively affect future employment? Or maybe I can give 1 week notice instead of 2 weeks?

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

So you've been solo for around three months, but leaving already for another company?

James M.'s Comment
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So you've been solo for around three months, but leaving already for another company?

No, I've been solo for 6 months now. I joined this forum 3 months ago.

Turtle's Comment
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Quitting a job after only 6 months will possibly have a greater negative impact than leaving without notice. Adding both together would certainly throw a red flag to me as a potential future employer.

My own experience when leaving Prime is a good example of how well it can go when you respectfully and professionally offer notice:

With over 3 weeks remaining before I was scheduled to start at my new job, I gave notice of my intention to leave. I too had home time scheduled for the interim. Through good-faith communication with my dispatcher I was able to not only continue running good miles, but also to get home and clean out my truck before being dispatched back to the yard to turn it in. By developing a good relationship with my team, I was treated with the same respect I gave out.

In a situation like yours, I'll always err on the side of respect and professionalism. Could it come back to bite you? Possibly, but doubtful. It's a tough call, to be sure.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
DaveDiesel's Comment
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If I come out of home time and say I would like to turn my truck in will this negatively affect future employment? Or maybe I can give 1 week notice instead of 2 weeks?

I think your future company would respect you for wanted to provide 2 weeks notice. I'd be surprised if they didn't support it by adjusting your timeline. In the back of their minds, they hope you would show them the same courtesy if you leave.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

A 2 week notice isn't required but it's the right thing to do. My current employer actually had a driver all set to start after he worked out a 2 week notice at his previous job. 2 business days before he was set to start with us they called his previous employer again. Turns out this guy ended up intentionally causing trouble there and didn't work out the 2 week notice. He never started with us. When I was in the hiring process they told me the way I handle leaving a job tells them all they need to know about my character. Also talking trash about other companies you've worked for isnt a good idea because they know if/when you decide to move on you're going to talk as negatively about them as you did the others. If you give a 2 week notice and they immediately route you to the terminal that's an entirely different situation and will not be held against you in a negative way.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

It is a respect issue. The company gave you employment. We are all happy to be employed. We all know no job is our forever place most likely. Your current employer will no doubt replace you. Sometimes that is quick, most times not.

Have a discussion with your DM and tell them what is coming and ask what they think. You are basically at the 2 week mark now. They should show you the same respect. It leaves it up too them. Followup the call with an email summary of the call.

If the company is worth their salt they will work the details out so both them and you are good with the outcome. It is in both parties best interest to do it this way.

Never burn bridges in life, you never know what the future will hold and you may need to walk across that bridge one day in the future.

Last year my GF left her company to come work for me. She did it this way. Her DM said this never happens so I will get back to you. After a couple hours he called her and had it all worked out for her to run another week for them ending at their main yard and processed her out. So she ended up with a 1 week notice at THEIR discretion. Timing things like this don’t always happen precise as working a normal 8-5 job. Bottom line they both were good with the outcome.

They have reached out to her a few times asking her to come back.

Let us know how it all works out. Best of luck to you!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Leeva804's Comment
member avatar

I just accepted a local position at another company and I'm supposed to start mid December. I'm currently on the road with home time scheduled for the 6th. I'm supposed to start the new job on the 16th.

I'm worried that if I put my notice in they'll tell me to turn the truck in before I can get home and unload my stuff and would have to leave most of it behind.

I also need a couple days before the job to do prehire drug screen and orientation classes.

If I come out of home time and say I would like to turn my truck in will this negatively affect future employment? Or maybe I can give 1 week notice instead of 2 weeks?

When I was in security I gave a two weeks notice all the time. Locally I can give a two weeks notice no problem. I would have no problem being on time to start my new job.

But if you’re OTR just know there are countless stories of drivers reporting not getting them home when it’s time to take the new job.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

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So you've been solo for around three months, but leaving already for another company?

double-quotes-end.png

No, I've been solo for 6 months now. I joined this forum 3 months ago.

Hiya, James.

Maybe my math (or my brain?) is off, but IIRC you were only one week out of the SWIFT academy, when you joined us 3 months ago. Something about your ABS harness, I believe.

How are you going to handle the money you owe them for training; have you factored THAT in? Seems that's even a bit MORE important than the two weeks or 10 days notice. Just IMHO.

Who's this 'local' gig you are going with, if you don't mind me asking? Had you not checked with Swift, to see if they had something more regional or dedicated to get you home more often? Is this 'local' gig involving Dollar type stores? Just trying to understand your conceptual reasoning is all, so I too, can form a more 'educated' piece of advice on this topic at hand.

Thanks, have a blessed day & best wishes~!

~ Anne ~

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

James M.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

So you've been solo for around three months, but leaving already for another company?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

No, I've been solo for 6 months now. I joined this forum 3 months ago.

double-quotes-end.png

Hiya, James.

Maybe my math (or my brain?) is off, but IIRC you were only one week out of the SWIFT academy, when you joined us 3 months ago. Something about your ABS harness, I believe.

How are you going to handle the money you owe them for training; have you factored THAT in? Seems that's even a bit MORE important than the two weeks or 10 days notice. Just IMHO.

Who's this 'local' gig you are going with, if you don't mind me asking? Had you not checked with Swift, to see if they had something more regional or dedicated to get you home more often? Is this 'local' gig involving Dollar type stores? Just trying to understand your conceptual reasoning is all, so I too, can form a more 'educated' piece of advice on this topic at hand.

Thanks, have a blessed day & best wishes~!

~ Anne ~

Hi. I never sent to Swift's academy, I paid for my training out of pocket. I guess it would be more accurate to say I've been solo for 5 months, but have 6 months of driving experience. I factored in my time with my on the road trainer to get that figure.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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