Best Way/Place To Begin

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Heath W.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Everyone, y'all probably have been asked this a million times but I'm new here, and haven't found the subject through searching the forum entries.

I'm just wondering what are recommended companies to begin with for paid CDL programs...im in OK...could also be in northern FL if need be.

Prime is near me in Springfield, they seem alright i guess but they have the gov at 62-65 i heard. Someone also recommended Freymiller out of OKC. Im going to contact them monday. Time and Money are essential to me right now...meaning the faster and cheaper the better at this time. I want to get going as quickly as possible, but also want to sign on with a solid secure company that treats people right.

Thank you all in advance for your guidance.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

What's wrong with being governed at 62-65 MPH? How fast do you want to go?

Any company willing to train you and put you in the drivers seat is the best way to go.

Companies are just that, companies. If you want to be treated right you have to build those relationships with your team. Dispatchers, driver managers, fleet managers etc are the only ones you need a relationship with and if you do right by them, they'll do right by you. It's a 2 way street. That means being on time and constant communication if something goes wrong.

Apply For Paid CDL Training will send your application to a bunch of companies that provide company sponsored training.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Heath, welcome to our forum!

Let me just "cut the corn and get right to the beans." That's what my grandpa used to say when he wanted to cut through the B.S. and shoot straight with me. You can spend an inordinate amount of time trying to find...

a solid secure company that treats people right.

The whole reason you are concerned about that is because of all the nonsense you've come across on the internet. It's terribly frustrating trying to make sense out of all the commentary you'll find about this or that trucking company. It's honestly a huge waste of time. If you want to believe that there are these trucking companies out here who have made it their business model to "treat people badly" then it's no wonder you are frustrated with your search. That is just about the dumbest myth the internet trucker wannabes have kept alive. If you want to be successful at trucking it won't matter what name is on the door of your truck. It could be Prime, or Swift, or maybe even J.B. Hunt. We understand your frustration. We battle these falsehoods daily here. That's how we got our name.

If you can make a successful go of this career it will be because of you and the ways you manage and conduct yourself. All these trucking companies are extremely similar. They all do the same thing. They move freight with big trucks. They use the same roadways, service the same customers, and all have to abide by the same rules. They all need drivers who can conquer the daily challenges that trucking dishes out. The difference always lies with the driver. Don't believe the knuckleheads who blame their trucking failures on the company. I know you've been researching all this stuff like crazy. Otherwise you wouldn't be so concerned about what Prime had their trucks governed at. Trust me, whoever hires you will have their trucks governed. They don't do that to limit your ability to make money. I brought in a hefty amount of money this year driving a truck governed at 63. My dispatcher told me I was the highest paid driver in our fleet.

You don't make money at this by driving fast. You learn to manage your time and how to deal with the issues that foul up everybody else. The company cannot take care of that for you. It's all on you. Trucking is performance based, and brother let me tell you these trucking companies love their high performers. The guys you are finding on the internet moaning, groaning, and crying about how this or that company cheated them are the guys who just couldn't ever cut the mustard out here. If you are going to be a winner, you don't take advice from the losers. They don't have a clue as to why they keep coming up short. I'm trying to help you understand that you don't have to waste much time choosing a company. If you can find someone to hire you then jump right in there and get going. You will make or break yourself out here and it won't have a single thing to do with who owns the truck.

You have the potential to be very successful at this. The secret is that you have to be highly productive. Trucking is a competition. If you can "Hang With The Big Dogs" you will be just fine. Don't sweat it about where you start - that's small potatoes. What you want to concern yourself with is how you will start. You hold the key to success at this. The company name on your truck has no influence on your performance. Highly productive drivers do really well out here. The other guys fall short and then go crying on the internet.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Heath, I forgot to mention we have a great way for you to Apply For Paid CDL Training. You can use that link to start applying for jobs that will train you with little or no money down. Those are all great places to get started at.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Old school is right on. Example from my career-I was the “safest” driver in our fleet last month (about 170 drivers.) The company tracks a bunch of our driving stats and gives us a safe score every month. I’ve been in the top five for the past year, but it pretty much means I’m the “slowest” driver in the fleet-I don’t go over the speed limit, don’t brake hard, don’t corner fast, etc. What blows people’s mind though, is I was also the top production driver at my terminal that month-I get more done in less time. It’s really not about driving fast-it’s all about doing the job efficiently.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

In more than five years driving, my average is 56.47 MPH all miles, loaded & empty. Every company truck I've driven has been capable of at least 65 MPH.

I still average better than 2700 miles every week, and I run recaps. Five years with 100% on time, too. Much less stress for me driving 60 to 62 MPH in the right lane.

Travis L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey, Heath I'm going through the same thing as you are. If it all goes well next year around spring/summer time. Im going to choose a trucking company, get my CDL and do my part. But honestly reading Old School's advice, is the best one I've found and read. And honestly why would you wanna go say 75 mph with carrying what 40,000 Ibs? I've seen YouTube videos of trucks, off the road or turned over because they was going to fast. And what I've gathered if I'm wrong or right about this. Is that in some states you are supposed to drive the limit or under? Like maybe California for one? I mean common no one should be a Snowman trying to evade the sheriff, and run along with Bandit with you.

And for choosing a company, go with the one that suits you. I'm debating on two companies and two have bad reputations. But in the long run I'm just wanting the opportunity and the experience that I need. So, that way I can transition to a home based company. Good luck though.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Heath W.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School,

merry christmas and happy holidays

thank you so much. i hear exactly what you're saying, and you're exactly bullseye with it. so i'll let those concerns go. thanks for "cutting the corn and getting right to the beans" so what makes a highly productive driver? what are the main challenges that snag some while HPD overcomes? Also, i have heard a difference in opinion about jumping into a paid cdl , for example prime, inc. versus going into a cdl school and then signing on. i'm hearing that the cdl school is a much better 'education' as it were. then you can sign w a company contract free also. is it better, one way or the other in your opinion?

sincerely h

Hello Heath, welcome to our forum!

Let me just "cut the corn and get right to the beans." That's what my grandpa used to say when he wanted to cut through the B.S. and shoot straight with me. You can spend an inordinate amount of time trying to find...

double-quotes-start.png

a solid secure company that treats people right.

double-quotes-end.png

The whole reason you are concerned about that is because of all the nonsense you've come across on the internet. It's terribly frustrating trying to make sense out of all the commentary you'll find about this or that trucking company. It's honestly a huge waste of time. If you want to believe that there are these trucking companies out here who have made it their business model to "treat people badly" then it's no wonder you are frustrated with your search. That is just about the dumbest myth the internet trucker wannabes have kept alive. If you want to be successful at trucking it won't matter what name is on the door of your truck. It could be Prime, or Swift, or maybe even J.B. Hunt. We understand your frustration. We battle these falsehoods daily here. That's how we got our name.

If you can make a successful go of this career it will be because of you and the ways you manage and conduct yourself. All these trucking companies are extremely similar. They all do the same thing. They move freight with big trucks. They use the same roadways, service the same customers, and all have to abide by the same rules. They all need drivers who can conquer the daily challenges that trucking dishes out. The difference always lies with the driver. Don't believe the knuckleheads who blame their trucking failures on the company. I know you've been researching all this stuff like crazy. Otherwise you wouldn't be so concerned about what Prime had their trucks governed at. Trust me, whoever hires you will have their trucks governed. They don't do that to limit your ability to make money. I brought in a hefty amount of money this year driving a truck governed at 63. My dispatcher told me I was the highest paid driver in our fleet.

You don't make money at this by driving fast. You learn to manage your time and how to deal with the issues that foul up everybody else. The company cannot take care of that for you. It's all on you. Trucking is performance based, and brother let me tell you these trucking companies love their high performers. The guys you are finding on the internet moaning, groaning, and crying about how this or that company cheated them are the guys who just couldn't ever cut the mustard out here. If you are going to be a winner, you don't take advice from the losers. They don't have a clue as to why they keep coming up short. I'm trying to help you understand that you don't have to waste much time choosing a company. If you can find someone to hire you then jump right in there and get going. You will make or break yourself out here and it won't have a single thing to do with who owns the truck.

You have the potential to be very successful at this. The secret is that you have to be highly productive. Trucking is a competition. If you can "Hang With The Big Dogs" you will be just fine. Don't sweat it about where you start - that's small potatoes. What you want to concern yourself with is how you will start. You hold the key to success at this. The company name on your truck has no influence on your performance. Highly productive drivers do really well out here. The other guys fall short and then go crying on the internet.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Heath W.'s Comment
member avatar

Andhe

thanks for your response. i understand exactly what you're saying. truth is i am a pretty slow and go driver. i am not a speedster. I'm mostly cautious and just take it easy in no hurry. i had just heard other truck drivers complaining about it and it made me feel concerned. but what you and old school have said makes a lot more sense to me. so what makes a "good trucker" and an "efficient" trucker? what should i focus on in regards to that in your view? hope you're having a happy holiday season btw. h

Old school is right on. Example from my career-I was the “safest” driver in our fleet last month (about 170 drivers.) The company tracks a bunch of our driving stats and gives us a safe score every month. I’ve been in the top five for the past year, but it pretty much means I’m the “slowest” driver in the fleet-I don’t go over the speed limit, don’t brake hard, don’t corner fast, etc. What blows people’s mind though, is I was also the top production driver at my terminal that month-I get more done in less time. It’s really not about driving fast-it’s all about doing the job efficiently.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Heath W.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Packrat

merry christmas and happy holidays to you. thanks for your reply. that is really amazing job you're doing. that is the kind of stats i wanna have. and I'm sure glad to hear you all are so positive about the governors and speed reduction. what does it mean running recaps?

God Bless h

In more than five years driving, my average is 56.47 MPH all miles, loaded & empty. Every company truck I've driven has been capable of at least 65 MPH.

I still average better than 2700 miles every week, and I run recaps. Five years with 100% on time, too. Much less stress for me driving 60 to 62 MPH in the right lane.

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