Choosing Between Two Local Companies

Topic 29919 | Page 2

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Errol V.'s Comment
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Anne, when you start a new comment, there's a blue button above your box that says "link". You fill in two boxes - the link and a human readable title.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

When you're looking at local companies, you want a large company like one of the LTL companies or Mega carriers that have accounts at a local distribution center.

The only reason is, these companies expect you to have incidents out there and they're prepared to deal with it. When your talking about going into residential areas, it's not just traffic anymore. It's light poles, people's property (lawns, mailboxes etc), cars in the street and drivers that don't have time to wait on you, they're going around.

A small company not prepared to eat those expenses will have no problem tossing you out if you damage property. If the company can eat the cost, they'll probably retrain you for a bit, send you out with a safety and you go on with your life. Yeah, your record will have some blemishes, but you still have a job. Looking for a job because your last employer fired you for property damage is tough, especially when they answer no to "eligible for rehire?"

At FedEx, I saw guys hit cars, take out mailboxes, hit low bridges and destroy lawns. They got sent out with safety and kept on rolling. Pepsi is the same way. Just report it in a timely manner so we can handle it and keep moving. Not even a slap on the wrist.

You want a company that's local, but nationwide. That support system is important and valuable. A small company doesn't have the resources to make sure you come out unscathed.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
KH's Comment
member avatar

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Do either of them involve going into or south of Boston?

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Both cover full Mass, so I assume that includes Boston :-(

Yeah, unfortunately I think with some companies they get inexperienced people to go in to the city because the senior guys don't want to do it. But it might not be like that at either of the places you are looking at, I don't know. And at least you'd be paid by the hour. I had a job where I had to go in to Boston and I got paid by the mile. Over all I was paid very well so I shouldn't really have let it bother me, but that didn't give me much comfort when I had to spend an hour driving across the city knowing I wasn't getting paid any extra for the trouble.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Anne, when you start a new comment, there's a blue button above your box that says "link". You fill in two boxes - the link and a human readable title.

Oh, I forgot the secret sauce:

If the link setup days that's not a URL, just fill the form out with www.google.com

Push the Submit button. Then simply replace the Google.com with the URL you want.

{a href="www.google.com"} Sample{/a}

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

10 to 12 stops. Doing runs into places like construction sites and residential areas. With a pallet jack. Tells me your are going to be in for some long, stressful, tiring days. Just bumping docks 10 to 12 times would be a long day. Add lugging a pallet jack around. Just be careful out there man. Especially with you only being out here for 5 months.

Have you ever considered running line haul for a ltl company like Old Dominion or FedEx?

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When you say 10 to 12 stops. What do you mean exactly? What will you be hauling?

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Anything, no hazmat though, since I don't have an endorsement yet. About 80% are businesses (furniture, hardware, construction, etc.), the rest is residential, I'll have to drop pallet on driveways with a jack.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Anne, when you start a new comment, there's a blue button above your box that says "link". You fill in two boxes - the link and a human readable title.

double-quotes-end.png

Oh, I forgot the secret sauce:

If the link setup days that's not a URL, just fill the form out with www.google.com

Push the Submit button. Then simply replace the Google.com with the URL you want.

{a href="www.google.com"} Sample{/a}

double-quotes-start.png

Anne, when you start a new comment, there's a blue button above your box that says "link". You fill in two boxes - the link and a human readable title.

double-quotes-end.png

Oh, I forgot the secret sauce:

If the link setup days that's not a URL, just fill the form out with www.google.com

Push the Submit button. Then simply replace the Google.com with the URL you want.

{a href="www.google.com"} Sample{/a}

Gotcha; thanks! I've posted MANY links, with nary a problem, and I've even LINKED TO a saferweb company itself before. Last two times it hasn't worked. Give it a try, sometime!

Thank you!!!! Will try THIS route, next time I need it.

~ Anne ~

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

I had road tests at several local companies, and got offers. I narrowed it down to two companies, and I would appreciate any advice helping me to make a right choice. Company A has about 300 trucks and 7 terminals. All trucks are auto, 2018-2018, all repairs are done in-house. Work hours are M-F, 8am until done, usually 10-12 hrs, OT after 50, routs are 10-12 stops, pay is $26. Company B is much smaller, it has 8 trucks, 2015-2018, all 10 speed, they do paper logs, work hours are M-Th, 8-10am until done, usually 10-12 hrs, OT after 40, routs are 10-12 stops, pay is $23. Both companies are 20 minutes from my home. I liked the owner at the smaller company, it does look like a family business. I also like the chance to drive a manual truck. I am not so sure about their maintenance though...

If you're going to do P&D you may as well go large and start with a big company. I put a couple links below for jobs with OD and FedEx. FedEx I would apply for the Driver Apprentice position as they will put you through their program. In either case you may even be able to start on the dock and wait for a slot if that's a possibility for you.

OD is out of Dracut, MA and FedEx North Billerica.

FedEx Freight

Old Dominion

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I had road tests at several local companies, and got offers. I narrowed it down to two companies, and I would appreciate any advice helping me to make a right choice. Company A has about 300 trucks and 7 terminals. All trucks are auto, 2018-2018, all repairs are done in-house. Work hours are M-F, 8am until done, usually 10-12 hrs, OT after 50, routs are 10-12 stops, pay is $26. Company B is much smaller, it has 8 trucks, 2015-2018, all 10 speed, they do paper logs, work hours are M-Th, 8-10am until done, usually 10-12 hrs, OT after 40, routs are 10-12 stops, pay is $23. Both companies are 20 minutes from my home. I liked the owner at the smaller company, it does look like a family business. I also like the chance to drive a manual truck. I am not so sure about their maintenance though...

Any updates, Andrey?

Thanks!

~ Anne ~

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

Any updates, Andrey?

The general consensus here and among other people I asked was that a bigger company is better, so I decided to follow this advice. Right know I am waiting for the drug test results, they are doing some paperwork. I haven't started driving yet, so there is no much to tell... It is good to have some extra time, I am finishing an addition to our chicken coop - to keep baby chicks separated from the older birds :-)

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