CFI Reviews?

Topic 30259 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

That sounds like a specialized gig. Once you have experience you will only have to test out in a manual truck to get rid of the restriction.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
(He makes around 120k-160k a year and gets a ton of home time, some company out of Portland
That sounds like a specialized gig.

It could be some sort of specialized gig, but I think it sounds like a lease operator blowing smoke to a rookie.

Melissa, be very careful what you believe from truckers who want to get you into their company. There is usually something in it for them. I don't know any truckers making that kind of money. My driver manager once told me I was the highest paid driver in my fleet, but I don't pull in that kind of scratch. I work really hard at earning what I do, but I don't see me ever taking in 160K. Your friend is either super man, or super mouth. Don't count on that kind of income from trucking anytime soon. Lease operators and/or owner operators sometimes like to give us their revenue numbers and call it their pay. Revenue numbers alone are irrelevant when trying to figure out what your income is.

There are some trucking jobs that might pay around 120K, but they are usually going to be extremely labor intensive delivery jobs like food service. Those drivers do many stops per day and unload all their product by hand. I doubt that is what you are wanting to do.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Another thing to consider, Melissa, is whether you would like to train new drivers. Prime pays their trainers extremely well. We have a long training period (30,000 miles). It is very rewarding. Not only financially but, it also feels great to teach a new driver how to succeed in this industry. Just something else to factor into your decision depending upon whether you think you might want to train new drivers in the future.

Also, to be honest, Prime pays more per mile but, reefers tend to get fewer miles on average than dry van drivers. This is bc wait times to get loaded/unloaded tend to be longer. Thus it eats into your available drive hours, meaning you will have fewer hours available to drive. This is especially true when you first go solo and your clock management skills are still being developed.

You can't go wrong really with either choice. You are the biggest factor in your success no matter what company you drive for. I hope this takes some stress out of the decision making process for you...knowing that neither choice will make or break your career. Good luck!

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
There are some trucking jobs that might pay around 120K, but they are usually going to be extremely labor intensive delivery jobs like food service. Those drivers do many stops per day and unload all their product by hand. I doubt that is what you are wanting to do.

You can do that with linehaul after a few years and never touch any freight or even make more than 1 stop.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
You can do that with linehaul after a few years and never touch any freight or even make more than 1 stop.

I'm not doubting you Bobcat Bob, in fact I have heard that from others. I have noticed one thing though, and I am sure it's probably because we mostly have newbies and OTR drivers here in this forum (I don't play around at other places on the internet). I always hear linehaul drivers say something like this... "We have drivers at our terminal making 120K, but I don't ever bid on those runs because of blah, blah, blah." I've just yet to come across one of those drivers actually making 120K.

I have a lot of respect for you guys. I could never do what you do. I'd be so bored I'd be clawing my eyes out. You guys earn every penny of it while I feel like I'm being rewarded for having fun.

I think we can all agree when we tell Melissa it is extremely doubtful she will be making 120K - 160K within any near future as a truck driver.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

I think I would enjoy a dedicated run , I did a dedicated run for a few weeks from edwardsville I'll to middle Tennessee and back and loved it until I had a hometime scheduled and never sniffed it again. Again, that was two weeks it might get boring after awhile. How does line haul even work with the "bidding".

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
How does line haul even work with the "bidding".

Every so often they re-bid their runs. The process is based on seniority. The guys with seniority get to pick (bid on) what run they want first. The process yields the best routes to the longest tenured drivers. Seniority is a big deal in the world of linehaul.

An OTR driver's pay is measured by their performance. Linehaul drivers are measured by their tenure.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
I always hear linehaul drivers say something like this... "We have drivers at our terminal making 120K, but I don't ever bid on those runs because of blah, blah, blah." I've just yet to come across one of those drivers actually making 120K.

they're probably too tired! smile.gif Daniel B had posted a few months back OD is at 74 or 75 CPM after 3 years of service. If you had a 600 mile run 5 days a week you'd hit 117k just off mileage. I believe most LTL also pay for hooking a set and hourly for delays and pre/post trip. 600 miles is very do-able depending on the region. Not linehaul, but we have guys that are able to run a 2 store 714 mile load and make it back with minutes to spare on their drive clock. I've talked to some linehaul guys out of Des Moines and they have runs to Sioux Falls SD, Grand Island NE (swap point), Madison WI, and of course Chicago all of which are about 600 mile runs.

I'd also claw my eyes out taking the same route every day/night and getting excited about construction just so it changes! The other downside is you're also doing that when the weather isn't the greatest during winter.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been following a few different diaries, most recently Nathan's, seeming I'm from Michigan also, if I go through cfi I would be following his path going through Trainco in Ohio. I do like how prime keeps you at one place through the whole training, with having the simulators to practice on. But also seems CFI is on top of getting you a trainer and into a truck quicker. I know Prime gives you a $200 advance each week in training, which could be very helpful. Both company's pay for housing and meals. Money will be tight for the 1st month, comparing out of pocket expenses would be very helpful. Being comfortable in a decent home away from home for the duration of my employment is pretty important, I'm almost 6 ft tall so having a little room is a bonus. I'm planning on taking a small non- shedding dog with me on the road when it's allowed. I see both company's allow for this... not sure on the fees/deposits at CFI, but Prime requires a $1k deposit. And then of course the pay, it seems Prime pays a little more. A video I watched, Trucking with Dave, said CFI had an increase in pay 6 months ago, 42cpm I believe? (Correct me if I'm wrong, been on information overload lately) Prime has fuel and safety bonuses, I believe CFI only has safety bonuses, correct? Looking at roughly 40k the 1st year with both company's? Some things aren't too important, but outweighing pros and cons can be a little confusing at 1st, knowing where will be a good fit. I've been blind in one eye for almost 30 years, to the point it was normal for me. So when I decided over a year ago on this career choice, I realized I needed a cornea transplant 1st. The thought of having my eye cut off and a donor stitched on has kept me from doing it my entire life. But this has been too important for me, so I had the surgery. So I've already overcame something I never thought I'd be able to do, and failing now is not an option for me, I've already came too far. I really appreciate the time helping me sort all this out!

thank-you-2.gif

The Kenworths are very roomy inside. Im 6 ft as well, with really long legs. my feet dont reach the end of the bed in mine. I trained in Freightliner. I didnt find it be nearly as roomy, nor have as good as fit and finish as the KW. Also, while it may have just been that particular truck, the ride on the Freightliner was phenomenally horrible. So bad that I think they substituted chunks of concrete for the suspension and should offer a complimentary kidney belt and subscription to a chiropractor. The KW rides like a Cadillac, very smooth.

Also, FWiW, Knight starts solo, after 3 to 4 weeks of training at .44 cpm , with safety, fuel and production bonuses avail monthly that I think can total up to another 4 or 5 cpm. Plus you get a transition bonus from training to solo. Pay while training is 800/wk. Pay in school is 480/wk. Youre hired before you start school, but you pay for your food and lodging for two of the three weeks of school, unless youre a veteran. Swift I think is .44 to start as well, Im not sure on their programs though.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Melissa J.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys :) I was up at the cabin past few days, don't get internet up there. I have lots to think about over the next few weeks, along with studying for my permit... while my transplant heals up. Thanks again everyone, stay safe out there

thank-you-2.gif thank-you-2.gif thank-you-2.gif

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More