After 3 Months, I’m Quitting

Topic 30726 | Page 2

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Don's Comment
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If you really like the other aspects of driving, DO NOT quit because you are having difficulties backing! Practice every opportunity you can. As others have stated, do not ask your co-driver to do it for you. That is only retarding your progress! Challenge yourself that you are going to get that trailer in the hole! GOAL as much as you need. Be patient, do not get upset with yourself. It WILL finally "click," and you will soon be doing just fine.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Go read my diary, I failed the CDL exam five times in the state of OR (backing, specifically the 90 alley dock). I would have had to wait a whole year to retest again under OR rules. I ended up having to physically move, yes you read that right, MOVE as in pack up and MOVE to a rented room at a friends house in WA state to test there with a guy who was willing to work with me. From a comfortable two bedroom where I’d lived my life to a rented room, humbling…. I passed the exam my first try.

I’ve been with May trucking for the last almost six months now, backing is still an issue for me at times. But I’ve never hit anything or wrecked a trailer or truck, I’ve goaled more times than most probably need to and I’m slow, but I’ve gotten better and things are starting to click.

If given a choice between a wide open dirt lot to park in or a PILOT or Loves, I still choose the dirt lot because at the end of the day I am tired and don’t want to risk it, be smart about it and stay dedicated. It will click

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Go read my diary, I failed the CDL exam five times in the state of OR (backing, specifically the 90 alley dock). I would have had to wait a whole year to retest again under OR rules. I ended up having to physically move, yes you read that right, MOVE as in pack up and MOVE to a rented room at a friends house in WA state to test there with a guy who was willing to work with me. From a comfortable two bedroom where I’d lived my life to a rented room, humbling…. I passed the exam my first try.

I’ve been with May trucking for the last almost six months now, backing is still an issue for me at times. But I’ve never hit anything or wrecked a trailer or truck, I’ve goaled more times than most probably need to and I’m slow, but I’ve gotten better and things are starting to click.

If given a choice between a wide open dirt lot to park in or a PILOT or Loves, I still choose the dirt lot because at the end of the day I am tired and don’t want to risk it, be smart about it and stay dedicated. It will click

Wow man, that's some freaking DEDICATION! Holy crap. Nice job. It really does get easier with time.. Seems like every so often something new will just "click" and it'll make more sense. I struggled with backing like anyone does but it came a little more naturally to me. My biggest struggle was keeping the truck square in the lane and not swerving especially when passing or being passed by other trucks. It took about a year before that clicked too and I stopped struggling so much with it. Now it's second nature.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Art M.'s Comment
member avatar

Easiest way to learn to back up, in, out.. is to get to understand, that my steering tires when I am moving forward do relocate to the rear of my trailer when I start to back it up. I steer my trailer tires and watch trajectory where they move.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, backing didn't "click" for me, until I was on my own, and had zero options other than get it in the hole. Stop waking up your co driver, and get it into your head that you CAN do this. You already know how to move the trailer, just buck up and do it.

Between May 11th and July 26th, during my TNT at Prime, I only had ONE textbook back that went in the hole without a fight. ONE. I cried. I questioned if I was ever going to "get it right." I knew I could go forward, but dang if I couldn't go backwards. I even jacked up a pull through parking job. My Fleet Manager literally rolled me through to Springfield, because he and my trainer had faith that I knew how to do it, I was just one that had to be put into a situation where I didn't have a choice. Kind of a tough love, shoved out of the nest situation.

Very first load out of Springfield? The Caves. Had to blind side not once, but twice. (Trainer never let me blindside.) It was less of a struggle than a sight side 45. Why? Because I hadn't ever jacked one up. Went right where I wanted it to go, with two pull ups (second was prob unnecessary,) and 4 GOALs.

I still struggle sometimes with sight side 45, but knowing that I CAN do it, and I know the steps to make it happen, make it easier. However, when "Captain Save-a-hoe" decides he needs to "guide me into the spot" is when I start messing up.

You got this.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
However, when "Captain Save-a-hoe" decides he needs to "guide me into the spot" is when I start messing up.

NaeNae, you literally made me break into a laugh with that statement! smile.gif

I always enjoy hearing someone turn a good phrase or a comical expression, and that one was completely new to me. Thanks for the laugh this morning!

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

However, when "Captain Save-a-hoe" decides he needs to "guide me into the spot" is when I start messing up.

double-quotes-end.png

NaeNae, you literally made me break into a laugh with that statement! smile.gif

I always enjoy hearing someone turn a good phrase or a comical expression, and that one was completely new to me. Thanks for the laugh this morning!

Glad I could make you laugh! I was a bit salty that night when I responded. There is a sub-set of well intentioned men out there, that "jump in to help" when they see ANY woman making the attempt to do their job. The first few times it happened (hood up, pre-tripping) I just laughed it off. The more it happens, the saltier I get. Between me and a few other female driver friends, it happens way more often than it should.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

You ladies have a lot more challenges out here than most of us realize. Don't take that wrong. I notice it all the time. The ladies are either clamored over like oddities that need to be closer examined or they are ridiculed by the nut cases who think they can't or shouldn't be doing "a man's job."

Hold your head high and keep up the great work! Thanks again for the laugh!

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

You ladies have a lot more challenges out here than most of us realize. Don't take that wrong. I notice it all the time. The ladies are either clamored over like oddities that need to be closer examined or they are ridiculed by the nut cases who think they can't or shouldn't be doing "a man's job."

Hold your head high and keep up the great work! Thanks again for the laugh!

No! The ladies everywhere are faced with many, many more challenges than we men face, IMO.

Kevin C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the advice. However, I’ve decided to hang it up. I seem to be only getting worse. I spent 35 mins trying to back a few days ago to a door and I only ended up in a worse spot than when I started. I have to say it was fun while it lasted. Best of luck to all you guys out there!

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