Advice Needed For New Rookie Getting First Job

Topic 31263 | Page 3

Page 3 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Dave's Comment
member avatar

Dave, I started with Schneider, dry van and stayed with them two years before moving to a Southeast Regional company. Many companies seem to have great operations at one location, but might be lacking at another.

The short duration of Schneider’s Orientation was perfect for me. It’s not for everyone and probably not a good idea for tanker if you have zero experience.

You have companies (such as John Fayard) based in Mississippi or McElroy (based in Alabama), Stevens Transport (Refrigerated out of Dallas) which might be an option. My point is; there are so many companies , don’t give up.

As for private school, that’s what I did. I’d be very surprised your school has NO recruiters coming in. Mine had plenty. Push the people there to get you connected. You’re paying them.

If you end up driving for Schneider, it’s a pretty good company.

Thanks Steve,

These are also the reasons I like Schneider. It's holiday season and many people are on vacation. Schneider told me I'd be meeting my regional recruiter in person soon.

As for the tanker driver, I've worked at sea. I am well aware of what a little wave can do to a 100-ton boat, and I've been hit by a few hammers while out to sea. No thanks to that, ever.

My dad started as a tech at Schneider and always said it was a good company. He always wanted me to be a driver. The day I made the decision to do it he suddenly and unexpectedly passed away. So, I never got the chance to tell him. It's almost like he knew and his mission on Earth was over.

I appreciate your feedback.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Dave's Comment
member avatar

You may check the Indeed website to find out which companies in your area are hiring rookies.

Thanks TCB,

I will look into it.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

If you want to know who runs in your area, go to the industrial parks and look at the trucks. I am in and out of Houston, Baytown and Galveston all the time.

Get your experience then choose what you want. You may be surprised what you thought you wanted isn't so great. What you thought would be PITA could be awesome.

I suspect G Town to be correct. Your expectations are keeping you from getting hired. Prime takes CDL grads all the time. They make them take an evaluation before putting them in team training and pay a low reimbursement compared to other companies ($1500 max I think over 3 months). They also pay LESS the first month and make them do more miles but they do in fact take new grads.

My guess is that you want day driving.... Local.. weekends off or something similar. Good luck. Which BTW you won't get as an owner op much either and still make a profit. There are plenty of us here working for the companies you mentioned and many at companies you haven't.

Don't discount companies. Apply to all of them. See what they offer. And don't be over dramatic. We all know you can find a job as a CDL grad. You say you know you have to pay your dues... So do it and next year the sky is the limit.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I went through private school almost 5 years ago and had no problems getting offers from every company I applied to. Swift I remember offered me to start in 3 or 4 days, Magnum was the same. I don't remember who it was but they said I could start that same week.

With drivers now being in higher demand than ever there has to he another problem, did you get a 160 hour certificate? Did you go to an accredited school? There was a school here in IL that some companies wouldn't take students from.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I am not here to recruit. I don't have a ton of time to be on here. Which is why I limit my comments.

I love CFI and since Brett refuses to update info on this site I give as much CFI info. I love CFI and the way drivers are treated here. After almost four years OTR , my wife wanted me home more. I asked for some specifics in a route and they made it for me. This cannot be done for everyone.

CFI is the only company I have worked for and can only talk about them. I do not get any referral bonus for inexperienced (student) drivers.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

Stevens has a heavy presence in Houston also.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Big Scott perhaps you should offer to update the CFI information and pass it on to Brett. I’m sure he’d appreciate the effort and gesture. As we all would.

Suggestion. If you don’t want to be perceived as a recruiter, then skip the hard sell. IMO you come off as selling...as if CFI is the only company on the face of the earth that treats their drivers like professionals. They are not. They treat you like any of the megas treat a driver who has made a long term commitment and proven themselves a top performing, safety first driver.

I am not here to recruit. I don't have a ton of time to be on here. Which is why I limit my comments.

I love CFI and since Brett refuses to update info on this site I give as much CFI info. I love CFI and the way drivers are treated here. After almost four years OTR , my wife wanted me home more. I asked for some specifics in a route and they made it for me. This cannot be done for everyone.

CFI is the only company I have worked for and can only talk about them. I do not get any referral bonus for inexperienced (student) drivers.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Big Scott perhaps you should offer to update the CFI information and pass it on to Brett. I’m sure he’d appreciate the effort and gesture. As we all would.

Suggestion. If you don’t want to be perceived as a recruiter, then skip the hard sell. IMO you come off as selling...as if CFI is the only company on the face of the earth that treats their drivers like professionals. They are not. They treat you like any of the megas treat a driver who has made a long term commitment and proven themselves a top performing, safety first driver.

double-quotes-start.png

I am not here to recruit. I don't have a ton of time to be on here. Which is why I limit my comments.

I love CFI and since Brett refuses to update info on this site I give as much CFI info. I love CFI and the way drivers are treated here. After almost four years OTR , my wife wanted me home more. I asked for some specifics in a route and they made it for me. This cannot be done for everyone.

CFI is the only company I have worked for and can only talk about them. I do not get any referral bonus for inexperienced (student) drivers.

double-quotes-end.png

C’mon now. He loves his company. When I was with Schneider, I couldn’t believe anyone would not like them. I still think they’re tops in the industry. I seem to remember a few times you were pretty strongly encouraging people to go to Swift. Nothing wrong with it.

AND, should we second-guess how a company treats their drivers if we’ve never driven for them? If you have, I apologize.

Maybe Big Scott is a little much for some of us. But doesn’t a passionate appreciation for one’s employer speak pretty well of said employer? 😊

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

C’mon on? Who said anything about second guessing his experience at CFI? It’s genuine.

I know he loves his company. And that is fantastic. Whenever I see a red KW I look to see if it’s got “Big Scott” stenciled on the door. But it has way more to do with his attitude, work ethic and performance than it does with CFI. That holds true with every company.

Overall I try very hard to be objective. I was never selling Swift. Primarily setting the facts straight when it was obvious they were being misrepresented.

I’m not going to apologize for suggesting he tone it down a bit. People will take him more seriously if he tempers it a bit. And I’m not the only one who feels this way.

double-quotes-start.png

Big Scott perhaps you should offer to update the CFI information and pass it on to Brett. I’m sure he’d appreciate the effort and gesture. As we all would.

Suggestion. If you don’t want to be perceived as a recruiter, then skip the hard sell. IMO you come off as selling...as if CFI is the only company on the face of the earth that treats their drivers like professionals. They are not. They treat you like any of the megas treat a driver who has made a long term commitment and proven themselves a top performing, safety first driver.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I am not here to recruit. I don't have a ton of time to be on here. Which is why I limit my comments.

I love CFI and since Brett refuses to update info on this site I give as much CFI info. I love CFI and the way drivers are treated here. After almost four years OTR , my wife wanted me home more. I asked for some specifics in a route and they made it for me. This cannot be done for everyone.

CFI is the only company I have worked for and can only talk about them. I do not get any referral bonus for inexperienced (student) drivers.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

C’mon now. He loves his company. When I was with Schneider, I couldn’t believe anyone would not like them. I still think they’re tops in the industry. I seem to remember a few times you were pretty strongly encouraging people to go to Swift. Nothing wrong with it.

AND, should we second-guess how a company treats their drivers if we’ve never driven for them? If you have, I apologize.

Maybe Big Scott is a little much for some of us. But doesn’t a passionate appreciation for one’s employer speak pretty well of said employer? 😊

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

midnight fox's Comment
member avatar

Impartial observer here. I've always figured Big Scott simply loves his company and wants to help it succeed. It would also be real easy for people who don't follow the forum regularly to perceive you to be a recruiter. Since the forum teaches paid CDL training as a best practice, it'd be important for it to not appear as though that wasn't merely being said because the forum is being run by the companies. I'm sure there is some middle ground there in how prospective drivers are being talked to about it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Page 3 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More