How To Handle Discrepancy With Pay From Employer

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Banks's Comment
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You picked a career that is a 3d version of Tetris and a division that's even more so. You're going to get frustrated and be confused at times. It happens.

If you don't feel safe tarping and securing, maybe try a different division. I'm not saying that to knock you or discourage you, but you're responsible for What's on your trailer. If you're not comfortable with that or with the training you received, don't do it. You have to be 100% sure that the load is 100% secured, if your not pull a different trailer.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

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Again, 2Sides....

COULD it be ... that you WERE ON a training pay structure, since you were following a lead driver? I'm not saying that's 'cool' or 'fair' .. but might be some devil in the details in some paperwork (or email?) or something you'd gotten??

One never knows, until they ask;

Monday will be here soon enough.

Stay safe, stay blessed; driver. You've gotten some SAGE advice here, from the pros !!

~ Anne ~

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Not sure Anne, I wasn't told I would still be on a training pay scale while following a driver. Yes Monday will be here soon enough and I can speak with someone about this. Thanks Anne.

Also, what is per diem? Old School mentioned that might be what I'm confused about but how would that affect my pay?? I see it is in my pay stub but I don't know what it actually is...

It's kinda hard for 'ME' to explain, but yes, Tom gets it. It's more 'insta pay' on his paystub, and makes his CPM 'appear' lower. Per Diem isn't taxable as CPM is. You get your money 'now' and it's not taxed, as your CPM would be. I'm bad at explaining, sorry. Most companies give you the 'option' or will give you a paper when you hire on, to 'opt out.'

Look up in that big white bar, Per Diem. Old School (and MANY others) explain it with bravo understanding.

"Per diem payments are daily allowances paid to employees to cover costs incurred while on a business trip. ... Per diem—the Latin term for "per day"—can also refer to a structural compensation system in which an employee is paid per day, as opposed to per hour or per month."

In essence, it's money you can use for food and living while driving. I don't know anyone that actually CAN access it per day, but then again, if you asked and needed it, I bet you could.

Example: Tom had a breakdown a while / few years ago, and wasn't properly 'equipped' (left his bank card home) so... his company put $500 (he'd earned, per diem ..) on his ComData card. Payroll worked it out.

Again, research it ... and look for it as a line item, on your stub. It's different!

I still have an 'odd' hunch that they did knock you down (somewhat) on your paycheck for being 'trained,' even as a follower of a lead. I'm not saying I'm 'down with it' but .. .it's just my hunch, as well.

Best, man. Idk!

~ Anne ~

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

You picked a career that is a 3d version of Tetris and a division that's even more so. You're going to get frustrated and be confused at times. It happens.

If you don't feel safe tarping and securing, maybe try a different division. I'm not saying that to knock you or discourage you, but you're responsible for What's on your trailer. If you're not comfortable with that or with the training you received, don't do it. You have to be 100% sure that the load is 100% secured, if your not pull a different trailer.

The tarping part is pretty self explanatory, with more practice I will get better. I like flatbed work so far and would rather do this than dry van.

That's why I'm thinking about going to a different company for training and experience but I got negative feed back from that. The only thing I'm concerned about is strapping a load. Not sure if you read my other posts but I will say it again.

My first load myself that I'm on now is 8 rows of aluminum sows. I've only done aluminum beams which seems to be again, pretty self explanatory but those 8 rows had me scared straight. I asked the loader how to strap it and made a phone call to another Knight driver. I ended up strapping it wrong and while at a Loves a driver told me this and I fixed the problem. I really am considering switching to dry van and then search for a flatbed company if I don't feel comfortable enough to continue, I will also ask my DM for another trainer on Monday....

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

It's kinda hard for 'ME' to explain, but yes, Tom gets it. It's more 'insta pay' on his paystub, and makes his CPM 'appear' lower. Per Diem isn't taxable as CPM is. You get your money 'now' and it's not taxed, as your CPM would be. I'm bad at explaining, sorry. Most companies give you the 'option' or will give you a paper when you hire on, to 'opt out.'

Look up in that big white bar, Per Diem. Old School (and MANY others) explain it with bravo understanding.

"Per diem payments are daily allowances paid to employees to cover costs incurred while on a business trip. ... Per diem—the Latin term for "per day"—can also refer to a structural compensation system in which an employee is paid per day, as opposed to per hour or per month."

In essence, it's money you can use for food and living while driving. I don't know anyone that actually CAN access it per day, but then again, if you asked and needed it, I bet you could.

Example: Tom had a breakdown a while / few years ago, and wasn't properly 'equipped' (left his bank card home) so... his company put $500 (he'd earned, per diem ..) on his ComData card. Payroll worked it out.

Again, research it ... and look for it as a line item, on your stub. It's different!

I still have an 'odd' hunch that they did knock you down (somewhat) on your paycheck for being 'trained,' even as a follower of a lead. I'm not saying I'm 'down with it' but .. .it's just my hunch, as well.

Best, man. Idk!

~ Anne ~

Thanks Momma Anne. I will research it, I don't remember any paperwork for per diem or signing anything saying that.

First I need to know my pay scale smh. I didn't ask anyone at the terminal what my pay scale is and only took what the recruiter said at 57cpm. Old School mentioned that is high for an inexperienced driver and I take his word for it. Maybe that per diem is what I'm not understanding.....

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

You've read O/s's replies that they 'ARE' indeed lacking training for a total newbie. I'm glad he posted that for you. I shared 'our' scare story in your diary, as well. It's when I had my 2nd CDLP and was driving w/Tom, but I refused to pull the decks; good thing. I did great w/tanks, and I've never pulled a van! (Feel like I can't see, truthfully. To me, that's harder.)

I see that day like it was yesterday. I was afraid for BOTH of us. Then again, WE drove for an O/O ... our fault, there. I'm just feeling a larger company would have more 'vested' in you, to leave you scared and unsure. Since Knight seems to NOT, for now, ... step back! Don't bail!

I hope you DO work out your payroll issues, man. ASK about the training pay, I feel that is an issue.... I just SO DO.

Switching BACK TO DRY VAN is in NO WAY a loss of masculinity, IMHO ... if that's what you feel you need to do.... I COMMEND YOU FOR IT!

Put it this way: If Tom were you ... (or in your shoes,) I'd be saying "Honey just go back to dry van!!!! Learn the REST there is to know about trucking/driving/parking NOW, and THEN maybe go back to Open Deck." I'd NEVER suggest he switch to another open deck company in hopes of learning more... because what "if not?"

You lose NO man card. If the other site tells you otherwise, that's on you for asking those guys. We know many of'em. Shamefully.

My opinion only, with a few chimes from the fat guy in the pic, LoL!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

The negative feedback is because the training will generally be the same anywhere you go. Don't believe me? Call and ask. I'd be willing to bet that at most they offer a week of load securement training, if that.

Have you had this conversation with Knight? The thing about big companies is that they have the resources to do these things for you. Send a message on your Qualcomm (if that's how they do it) to safety saying you feel you need more training. Communication works 2 ways and you have to be vocal with them about your issues and you can't fly off the handle when they don't get back to you right away.

I once had a major blowout with a supervisor at FedEx. I sent out a long detailed email to HR, Regional HR, The terminal manager and the regional VP. It took them 8 working days to get somebody out to talk to me. The detailed what corrective actions they took against the supervisor and told me how to handle it next time, if there is a next time. Imagine if I would've quit because they didn't get back to me the next day. You have to give things time to play out.

There's a reason I sent the email. First, I let it sit in the draft box for a bit to think about it and make sure I include everything. Second, I get everything out with no interruptions. Third, I communicate better by writing and lastly, I have a copy for my records. If anything happened with that supervisor or any retaliation, I have proof that I made them aware of the issues.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

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Actually, no because we have seen it far too many times where beginners get frustrated and they come here but don't think to go to their office to ask questions there. Don't know why it is, but it is that way a lot.

Laura

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I understand that. But please try not to put me into the same group as others. Is that not the same as ppl saying all truckers are a certain way because of the few that give trucking a bad name? I mean no disrespect towards you Laura. Thank you for your reply

To be perfectly frank, you put yourself into the same group as others so don't make like Laura or anyone else has done that. Nobody means any disrespect to you either but you in fact did exactly what she said. You came on here talking about quitting and going elsewhere over a single check that you don't understand and your feeling that you need more training, all without having discussed it with the appropriate departments. You are defeated and discouraged after a mere 2 weeks and think you know better then your successful employer to the point of suggesting no other new drivers go there because they don't know what they're doing and won't train them properly. Or am I missing something here?

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm assuming that flatbed works the same as our other divisions. Your first solo 30k miles are technically squire miles. I think they were at lower rate as well. I could be wrong about the rate. I'd have to go back and look.

I'm surprised that you were shifted to flatbed directly after training, as the procedure knight listed was 30k solo training miles OTR. And then upon completion, you become a full knight driving associate. I thought I ran over this somewhere in my diary, but the full training procedure is:

Squire school 3 weeks

Top gun or OTR training with trainer, 3 to 4 weeks.

30k solo OTR miles under guidance of DDM.

There's a really good thread on here about per diem. I chose not to for my own strategy this year. I'd hit the search function on it.

I'm very slow and conservative in my choices. In watching the struggles you have been enduring with going directly to flatbed has reafirmed my slow approach and why I want at least a year of dry van before I tackle something else.

Im wondering if you might want to perhaps talk to your DDM and or TM about doing your 30k solo miles in dry van?

Just a thought, might make it easier on you. As far as payroll, as was said, politely address the issues with your DM , I do via email so it's documented. Mine always takes care of me.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

That’s not entirely true Banks, regarding the week of training. It’s true that Knight doesn’t have the best training program for open deck but In regards to companies who train and do open deck work, they’re the exception. If TwoSides wants to lessen open deck work, he needs to go with a company with an established training program. He’s going to have to suck it up though, pay attention, not let himself get flustered when he has difficulty and stay focused. ATS, TMC, Prime, Maverick and a few others have very good open deck programs with lots of hands on experience but they expect the student to do their part.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Good to know, Robert. Thank you for the correction.

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