Is All Load Planning Not Planned Very Well Or Just My Company?

Topic 31734 | Page 3

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:
George B.'s Comment
member avatar

In a perfect world (click your ruby slippers) dispatch, load planners, etc etc should all be required to ride along and/or have a friggin cdl. rofl-3.gif wtf-2.gif Whoa! Sorry just woke up from a dream! rofl-2.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Too funny...

The majority of Swift’s , planners, safety managers and terminal managers I worked with for my 8 years there were former drivers. Several of them still drive part time. The most recent terminal manager was a driver for 12 years.

It used to be a requirement that was recently relaxed.

In a perfect world (click your ruby slippers) dispatch, load planners, etc etc should all be required to ride along and/or have a friggin cdl. rofl-3.gif wtf-2.gif Whoa! Sorry just woke up from a dream! rofl-2.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Too funny...

The majority of Swift’s , planners, safety managers and terminal managers I worked with for my 8 years there were former drivers. Several of them still drive part time. The most recent terminal manager was a driver for 12 years.

It used to be a requirement that was recently relaxed.

double-quotes-start.png

In a perfect world (click your ruby slippers) dispatch, load planners, etc etc should all be required to ride along and/or have a friggin cdl. rofl-3.gif wtf-2.gif Whoa! Sorry just woke up from a dream! rofl-2.gif

double-quotes-end.png

Instead of the FMCSA 'worrying' about L/Ops.. they really SHOULD make it mandatory for dispatchers (dipsticks as my other half says) and FM's to have CDL's.

Luckily, our evening guy does. SMDH.

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Anne I would settle for mandatory parking at customers or at least in industrial parks

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

Anne I would settle for mandatory parking at customers or at least in industrial parks

Agreed! I see so much wasted space at some of these locations, that by doing away with certain decorative landscaping, they could wrap a two lane around the building. Make it a one way private street, two lanes. One for parking, one for actively driving into the facility.

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Good to know. Once again Swift gets props in my book.

Too funny...

The majority of Swift’s , planners, safety managers and terminal managers I worked with for my 8 years there were former drivers. Several of them still drive part time. The most recent terminal manager was a driver for 12 years.

It used to be a requirement that was recently relaxed.

double-quotes-start.png

In a perfect world (click your ruby slippers) dispatch, load planners, etc etc should all be required to ride along and/or have a friggin cdl. rofl-3.gif wtf-2.gif Whoa! Sorry just woke up from a dream! rofl-2.gif

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
I dont know if this is just how the industry is or if my terminal is just very dysfunctional? When I run out of other terminals, the problem doesnt seem to occur nearly as much, but its definitely building up to me looking elsewhere for employment.

To answer your question really directly…the answer really is both. Sometimes that’s just how it is. Something I had to remind Truckin Mama while I was training her is that their priority is to move the freight not the driver and there are usually things going on behind the scenes that we’re not aware of.

That said, yeah I’m sorry but that’s inefficient as hell and I’d be very frustrated as well. Like you mentioned in a later comment there was obviously a lack of proper communication between the various people involved in the process. Things like this happen from time to time and it’s part of trucking but if it were happening frequently personally I’d be looking around too. Sometimes the answer is getting on a different fleet in your company, different dispatcher , etc. When I worked at Swift my productivity when OTR had a lot to do with who my dispatcher was. When I switched to certain dedicated fleets I tended to have more consistent work and scheduling.

Not to tote my own company but to give some perspective I never sit around on my fleet. The longest I’ve ever sat was like 6 hours when we had a terrible windstorm and Home Depot refused to unload me until the wind died down some. I don’t always run as hard as I want but like G Town said building relationships is crucial to running more efficiently and consistently.

I think the best advice I can give is you gotta find your niche. The fleet you’re on may not be the best fit for you. That doesn’t necessarily mean switching companies especially working for a larger carrier like Knight. IMO one of the greatest advantages of working for a larger carrier is the ability to try different options without jumping ship. Not saying don’t jump ship but I want to make it clear that jumping ship is also kinda a last resort especially this early in the game. I also suspect that inexperience could potentially be a factor here as well. There have indeed been very high winds all around lately and if you can’t run you can’t run. But just throwing it out there (no assumptions here, just recognizing it’s a possibility), I wonder if there might have been smaller pockets of lower wind conditions when you could have advanced the load more quickly than sitting for four whole days. Oftentimes the winds die down at night giving you a window to get moving. Again, I don’t know and I imagine you already thought of this but I’m just thinking out loud.

Hopefully at least some of that is helpful

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I dont know if this is just how the industry is or if my terminal is just very dysfunctional? When I run out of other terminals, the problem doesnt seem to occur nearly as much, but its definitely building up to me looking elsewhere for employment.

double-quotes-end.png

To answer your question really directly…the answer really is both. Sometimes that’s just how it is. Something I had to remind Truckin Mama while I was training her is that their priority is to move the freight not the driver and there are usually things going on behind the scenes that we’re not aware of.

That said, yeah I’m sorry but that’s inefficient as hell and I’d be very frustrated as well. Like you mentioned in a later comment there was obviously a lack of proper communication between the various people involved in the process. Things like this happen from time to time and it’s part of trucking but if it were happening frequently personally I’d be looking around too. Sometimes the answer is getting on a different fleet in your company, different dispatcher , etc. When I worked at Swift my productivity when OTR had a lot to do with who my dispatcher was. When I switched to certain dedicated fleets I tended to have more consistent work and scheduling.

Not to tote my own company but to give some perspective I never sit around on my fleet. The longest I’ve ever sat was like 6 hours when we had a terrible windstorm and Home Depot refused to unload me until the wind died down some. I don’t always run as hard as I want but like G Town said building relationships is crucial to running more efficiently and consistently.

I think the best advice I can give is you gotta find your niche. The fleet you’re on may not be the best fit for you. That doesn’t necessarily mean switching companies especially working for a larger carrier like Knight. IMO one of the greatest advantages of working for a larger carrier is the ability to try different options without jumping ship. Not saying don’t jump ship but I want to make it clear that jumping ship is also kinda a last resort especially this early in the game. I also suspect that inexperience could potentially be a factor here as well. There have indeed been very high winds all around lately and if you can’t run you can’t run. But just throwing it out there (no assumptions here, just recognizing it’s a possibility), I wonder if there might have been smaller pockets of lower wind conditions when you could have advanced the load more quickly than sitting for four whole days. Oftentimes the winds die down at night giving you a window to get moving. Again, I don’t know and I imagine you already thought of this but I’m just thinking out loud.

Hopefully at least some of that is helpful

I do usually run the pockets for wind at night. I didnt in this case because I was cranky about the load and the wind wasnt following that pattern, it was staying gusty at night. Ive for sure thought about switching it up within Knight. I keep my mouth shut with them though, especially when Im frustrated. Im developing a good relationship with my new DM , and through him the planners to the extent that I can. Even with shutting down, my numbers are still good and I continue to bank favors. Some days are better than others as with most of life. My DM has repeatedly told me that Im his only driver that he can leave unattended and not have to worry about anything. I typically solve whatever issues come up and or bring them to his attention promptly. Hes a good kid and I hope he sticks around. I dont know if its the norm or not, but him and I will bs and talk on the phone for extended periods of time, not about work, just life in general, I didnt have that with my other DMs.

I often wonder if dry van isnt my niche. Its all Ive done, and I tremendously enjoy it so far, I like the open road and going to new places but I also enjoy running through areas that I know each little idiosyncrasy and nook and cranny of. Im definitely not fond of live loads/unloads, and I hate early mornings. I do however love the sound of a reefer running all night, puts me right too sleep. Im still fascinated by flatbeds. I figure Ill keep doing dry van and building my reputation for now but keep an open mind to other stuff. Im just now getting to the point where Im really comfortable backing and can do it by instinct and feel a lot of the time. Where you just know its going where you intended, how you intended. I feel like Im not fighting the trailer anymore and I enjoy it, but that may mean its time to grow again.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Anne I would settle for mandatory parking at customers or at least in industrial parks

double-quotes-start.png

Anne I would settle for mandatory parking at customers or at least in industrial parks

double-quotes-end.png

Agreed! I see so much wasted space at some of these locations, that by doing away with certain decorative landscaping, they could wrap a two lane around the building. Make it a one way private street, two lanes. One for parking, one for actively driving into the facility.

I hear you, gals. I do. How DOES one start and/or support such legislation that's been overlooked for so long, anyway?

Heck, the being able to use the restroom at the shippers/receivers is just NOW catching steam, .. and only in a 'few' states!

~ Anne ~

ps: send me a link to the parking one; it'll be at the top of my list, and I dang sure promise!

pps: NaeNae ... I always wonder 'why' there are t/t tracks in the 'pretty pretty' stuff at some of these places.....and in the back of my mind, the Italian part of me speaks up, and says, "hehehehehe...should've been mine!" ;)

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Knight Transport Advice For New Truck Drivers Dealing With The Boss Dispatcher Issues Time Management Trip Planning
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More