Old Man Leaves Six-Figure Management Position To Begin Training As A Trucker: Psychiatric Evaluation Pending

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George B.'s Comment
member avatar

I watched a news story on the cvcc program I will see if I can find it again. The story mentioned partnering w Foster Fuels and Watts petroleum to hire grads. Looks like a tanker job could possible right out of the program.

Grandpa Clark's Comment
member avatar

I watched a news story on the cvcc program I will see if I can find it again. The story mentioned partnering w Foster Fuels and Watts petroleum to hire grads. Looks like a tanker job could possible right out of the program.

Thanks for the information, George. I might just reach out to Foster Fuels and see if I can find anything out about that. Much appreciated. If you can find that link I'd be very interested.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Tankers, especially food-grade (unbaffled), are not recommended for rookies.

Flatbed, Reefer and dryvan is far more forgiving as you hone skills and develop “a feel” for the dynamics of a 72’ long, 80,000lb semi.

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I watched a news story on the cvcc program I will see if I can find it again. The story mentioned partnering w Foster Fuels and Watts petroleum to hire grads. Looks like a tanker job could possible right out of the program.

Thanks for the information, George. I might just reach out to Foster Fuels and see if I can find anything out about that. Much appreciated. If you can find that link I'd be very interested.

double-quotes-end.png

Tankers, especially food-grade (unbaffled), are not recommended for rookies.

Flatbed, Reefer and dryvan is far more forgiving as you hone skills and develop “a feel” for the dynamics of a 72’ long, 80,000lb semi.

Steve, Grandpa Clark;

I TOTALLY agree w/ G'Town here, 1000% ! Tom had many years of driving behind him, before he even pulled asphalt tankers. Very low viscosity, even. Yet you could SURE feel the movement, the surge could push one right into the intersection if not in the right gear/brakes/everything just so. I was with Tom for the few years he had that job. It's NOT for 'starters,' trust me from knowing and being there.

Foster Fuels will still be hiring a year or two from now, after you get your feet wet ! Read some of PJ's posts; he was with a mega (or 2?) before he got into hauling tanks, and Daniel B., as well. Daniel was even a trainer for Prime, before he moved to tanks. Now, he's with ODFL. Have you considered LTL? Read G'Town's thread on PFG; there's definitely some 'physicality' to it, as well!

Many other recruiters will probably show up at your class, with offers right out of the gate, as well. System Transport is another flatbed company to look at; since you'll already have your CDL. Pianoman worked for them, as did (i believe?) Starcar, quite some time ago. You can search by member, and read their materials. Keim is another flatbed company you can look into; don't know their level of experience required, however; I'll let YOU look! Keim T.S. . Another 'big boy' in the flatbed world you can look into, with some van experience, that hires in your area, is Transport National.

Always something to work TOWARD!

Regarding your training, here's that info you were talking about: CVCC's New CDL Program! Looks pretty cool; just published 2 days ago.

Best to all;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Grandpa Clark's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I watched a news story on the cvcc program I will see if I can find it again. The story mentioned partnering w Foster Fuels and Watts petroleum to hire grads. Looks like a tanker job could possible right out of the program.

Thanks for the information, George. I might just reach out to Foster Fuels and see if I can find anything out about that. Much appreciated. If you can find that link I'd be very interested.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-start.png

Tankers, especially food-grade (unbaffled), are not recommended for rookies.

Flatbed, Reefer and dryvan is far more forgiving as you hone skills and develop “a feel” for the dynamics of a 72’ long, 80,000lb semi.

double-quotes-end.png

Steve, Grandpa Clark;

I TOTALLY agree w/ G'Town here, 1000% ! Tom had many years of driving behind him, before he even pulled asphalt tankers. Very low viscosity, even. Yet you could SURE feel the movement, the surge could push one right into the intersection if not in the right gear/brakes/everything just so. I was with Tom for the few years he had that job. It's NOT for 'starters,' trust me from knowing and being there.

Foster Fuels will still be hiring a year or two from now, after you get your feet wet ! Read some of PJ's posts; he was with a mega (or 2?) before he got into hauling tanks, and Daniel B., as well. Daniel was even a trainer for Prime, before he moved to tanks. Now, he's with ODFL. Have you considered LTL? Read G'Town's thread on PFG; there's definitely some 'physicality' to it, as well!

Many other recruiters will probably show up at your class, with offers right out of the gate, as well. System Transport is another flatbed company to look at; since you'll already have your CDL. Pianoman worked for them, as did (i believe?) Starcar, quite some time ago. You can search by member, and read their materials. Keim is another flatbed company you can look into; don't know their level of experience required, however; I'll let YOU look! Keim T.S. . Another 'big boy' in the flatbed world you can look into, with some van experience, that hires in your area, is Transport National.

Always something to work TOWARD!

Regarding your training, here's that info you were talking about: CVCC's New CDL Program! Looks pretty cool; just published 2 days ago.

Best to all;

~ Anne ~

Wow, Anne! Ask and ye shall receive! Thanks so much for the helpful links and everyone's advice is very consistent regarding starting w/tankers. As with any industry, you don't know what you don't know and that's why this group has been such a blessing over all these years I have been lurking. Hearing this great advice from people with real-world experience makes all the difference. Thanks to G-Town and you both for taking the time to provide such valuable information.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Every so often I’m charged with moving our water tanker… it’s like driving a wave tank. Especially when it’s half empty, off-road.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I pulled chemical tankers for 5 1/2 yrs. Just about everything liquid non food grade. Any company that would put a inexperienced driver in that position is a complete idiot, in my opinion.

Liquid is constantly moving. The smoother you are the better, but still a product in constant motion. That is a challenge. New drivers don’t have the skills needed to safely deal with this. I have experienced surge of product and would have sworn someone rear ended me.

That is just the driving part. Tankers are not all the same. It takes much more training and experience to safely deal with the tanker plus the wide variety of products.

I loved the job, maybe I’m a bit off, lol.

I have moved forward toward slowing sown and back to flatbed work. Same product all the time, so not really a true flatbedder.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Glenbob's Comment
member avatar

Best of luck to you. I walked away from being the broker owner of 3 real estate franchises to start this adventure at 62. You can do it! I can say from conversations I’ve had with our corporate owners, safety department and terminal manager our company (Knight Transportation) loves their “older” drivers. One at our terminal is 77. Don’t want to say it’s the easiest but from my limited experience would recommend training and experience in dry van. Then move to what interest you from there. I really wanted flatbed work, but it was not sustainable for me. Gaining experience every day DV with the new goal of moving to tanker someday down the road. Keep an open mind and be receptive to correction/direction. There’s a good chance your trainer will be half your age.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Grandpa Clark's Comment
member avatar

Best of luck to you. I walked away from being the broker owner of 3 real estate franchises to start this adventure at 62. You can do it! I can say from conversations I’ve had with our corporate owners, safety department and terminal manager our company (Knight Transportation) loves their “older” drivers. One at our terminal is 77. Don’t want to say it’s the easiest but from my limited experience would recommend training and experience in dry van. Then move to what interest you from there. I really wanted flatbed work, but it was not sustainable for me. Gaining experience every day DV with the new goal of moving to tanker someday down the road. Keep an open mind and be receptive to correction/direction. There’s a good chance your trainer will be half your age.

Thanks, Glenbob, I appreciate you sharing your experience and advice. When you were considering flatbed, did you then, or do you now have any companies that stood out to you as good options for guys of our era? I'm looking for some physical exercise after sitting in a cubicle for the past 25+years. I'm in good health and looking to stay very active as I move into my retirement years. The corporate stress bs has definitely taken its toll on me and I have no preconceived ideas that a new career as a driver will be stress-free, however, I have always felt that if your attitude and work ethic are on point, you can tough your way through new and challenging experiences. Based on reading the experiences of others, including your own experiences, it seems that it is an intense, ongoing learning experience for the first years for sure. Having been a life-long learner, I'm always suspicious when I meet experts that say that they know everything and have nothing left to learn. This website has really helped me glean some great information from people who are willing to share their victories and their failures. Both can be equally valuable. Learning new skills is one of life's greatest blessings and I'm looking forward to learning this new skill-set.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
BK's Comment
member avatar

This may be too late, but how about TMC? Great equipment based on my observation.

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