DM Compensation.

Topic 32043 | Page 1

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BK's Comment
member avatar

The company I drive for is not very big. About 400 trucks, maybe 300 or so drivers. So I was at the terminal last week and I crossed paths with the safety director. I also know the head of the DM department. Mr. Safety told me that there is a natural tug of war between the two departments. Safety steps on the brakes, production steps on the gas.

This led me to wonder how Driver Managers get paid. Are they on commission? Do they urge drivers on to greater production so as to get a bigger paycheck? This is in no way a criticism of the process, I’m just curious.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
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Bruce, trucking is all about productivity. Drivers are not the only ones who get paid based on their performance. Most trucking companies have ways for each of their mid-level managers to improve their income by maximizing use of their drivers available hours, reaching goals of tons of freight moved, and various other goals.

Safety people have goals to meet also. Moving freight is a delicate dance of ying and yang finding a delicate balance of efficiency.

BK's Comment
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Old School, understood.

I’m just glad that, so far, I’m making both these guys some money. Lol.

Greg M.'s Comment
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What I find interesting is how lowly paid some of the trucking industry office staffs are.

I had a heart attack in 2020 and it soon became apparent that I was not going to be able to pass a DOT physical for some time. My employer, Ryder, and I briefly discussed me moving into the office. During our discussions I found out that I was one of the highest earning drivers, almost $90k in 2019. The dispatch position I reported to had a salary in the mid $30s, next level up mid $40s. I was making almost as much as the site General Manager.

I had already been approved for 9 months of ST disability at over $900/week so we both decided that it did not make much sense for me to move at the time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

What I find interesting is how lowly paid some of the trucking industry office staffs are.

I had a heart attack in 2020 and it soon became apparent that I was not going to be able to pass a DOT physical for some time. My employer, Ryder, and I briefly discussed me moving into the office. During our discussions I found out that I was one of the highest earning drivers, almost $90k in 2019. The dispatch position I reported to had a salary in the mid $30s, next level up mid $40s. I was making almost as much as the site General Manager.

I had already been approved for 9 months of ST disability at over $900/week so we both decided that it did not make much sense for me to move at the time.

This is one of the biggest reasons most dispatchers are not career dispatchers: low wages and high stress. It's a job I have never had a desire for. I'll stick to driving, managing a group of one.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

My wife has been an OTR dispatcher for 7 years. Her 1st company was very small roughly a dozen drivers. She was taking home $2400 a month salary.

She went to a different company in January this year. She's making $1000 per week but as a 1099.

I've been on the receiving end of her ranting about her drivers. Man, you guys wouldn't believe some of the absolute stupidity of some of her drivers. The things they do sometimes are absolutely mind blowing.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Our fleet managers are paid well, and yes, on commission.... And get bonuses for things like lowering net fuel costs, number of teams/trainers etc.

However. They also get charged when the drivers screw things up.... Such as not using our detention stamp or a driver not using a lock on the trailer. So they have an incentive to make sure we are safe and doing our job as well as getting us loaded.

In their training period they are not paid nearly enough to me, but it is comparable to local establishments in the area.

But I also think we as drivers over estimate all other job pay now. A 25 year teacher with a Masters Degree makes about $80,000 per year in my home town and the board superintendent with a doctorate running 8 schools makes $125k. The USPS plant manager where I worked is now making $150,000 managing 3 buildings and 2400 employees.

Here I am making somewhere between that with a Bachelor's degree that has nothing to do with trucking. Setting my own schedule, home daily, loving my boss and company.

I come home every day and think... "Damn I have the best job and an awesome life".

Disclaimer::::. Being a non smoking female trainer I am in high demand. Having stayed and built a reputation at one company, being a sort of "female face of prime" in various media outlets and having helped create some awesome drivers has given me a lot of power. One of you recently asked me why I stay and deal with the BS and truth is...1). The post office set such a low bar that I am incredibly happy. 2). I don't deal with the same things others do.

I am not given crappy loads repeatedly. A favor with a back up good load, sure. But honestly I earned everything I get due to hard work, communication, and drive.

Doing the CDL Instruction made me feel incompetent cause it put a ton of pressure on me. If I sucked, I risk someone not advancing in life and pay. It took me quite a few months to truly feel like I got this. Yesterday one of the top trainers at prime that I only know in passing approached me saying that he usually only deals with the "problem" trainers and only heard great things about me. He said "your students love you, but feel confident that they know what they are doing."

Yay... Awesome job awesome life

Sorry I went sideways with this topic 😂

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Stevo Reno's Comment
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Rainy, I remember when you first came to TT way back when. You were like a sponge, seeking knowledge, and look how well you have done over these past few years. You deserve ALL you've attained and then some !! Proof hard work and determination, to be the BEST at what you do, DOES pay off in the end !! Keep on rockin' it girl, you like many others in here have my utmost respect, and appreciation for all you do on the road, and within this #1 site

We need a "High Fives" emojie in here sometimes !!

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