California Dreamin'?

Topic 32253 | Page 1

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Don's Comment
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I am just asking for future consideration, but for anyone based out of California or is there all the time, what is the industry there like for a driver? Pro's, con's, particular regulations pertaining to, etc, for Cali?

BK's Comment
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Don, according to PackRat, California is not part of the United States. So you may need dual citizenship. Lol

Pacific Pearl's Comment
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Not sure if you're thinking about moving there or just visiting. The two biggest drivers for California freight are their ports (LA & Long Beach) and the I-5 corridor. There's also a lot of business moving freight out of California for the 76,000 trucks that are illegal to drive in California. You can't drive a pre-DEF truck in California PERIOD. That means there's plenty of work moving freight across the borders for those trucks.

California is big on truck regulations. If I drive on my regular route from WA to MD (25 miles past the White House) I will get called into TWO weigh stations - one about 25 miles East of my DC and the, "fake" weight station in WV that's really an unmanned brake check area. If I sub for another driver and go to the DC in Ontario I'll hit SIX between WA and San Francisco. Of course there's the other oppression - idle restrictions, truck parking restrictions near residential areas, trucks are right lane ONLY and a 55 mph speed limit for trucks.

Traffic is BRUTAL. I wouldn't drive I-5 if I were paid by the mile - it's not worth it. Driving through a metro area Portland, Sacramento, LA can take 20 to 30 minutes or 6 HOURS. Trust me, you work A LOT harder in the 6 hour version because of four wheelers making bad choices. I'd rather earn my $200 than take the <$5 pay package. There's also the drivers. A turn signal isn't a way of politely letting other drivers know your intentions - it's a challenge. Once your blinker starts flashing the cars in that lane or the lane you're already in will speed up in and try to pass you. Of course, monkey see, monkey do so other drivers will copy them so they don't get, :stuck behind a truck". Your only hope is to get your back end in the new lane and as quickly as possible or you'll be receiving your social security checks in the truck before a driver will let you in the lane you need to be in.

Parking at a truck stop near your receiver for an early morning delivery isn't really an option. Truck stops are usually a ways away from the population centers. If you're going into LA from I-5 North your best bet is Arvin. There are some smaller truck stops in the hills before you get to LA but it can be a trick finding a space because they're relatively small for the amount of traffic. From the East your best bet is Barstow.

The one good thing about driving in California is the weather. It's rare you would have to chain up on I-5. You can drive for YEARS without having to chain and if you did it would only be on the Siskiyous on your way to Oregon. If you have to go on I-80 to Reno or other points East you will chain several times a year, every year. While Winter driving on Donner can be BRUTAL they do have several large, wide spots for chaining up trucks and lots of signage letting you know about weather hazards.

If you're planning on moving there - DON'T. Income taxes are brutal (8% for $48,436 to $61,214, 9.3% after that). Housing costs are obscene (median cost of a house in Los Angeles in $955,000). AB5 makes it illegal for you to become an owner-ob.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Harvey C.'s Comment
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Don, I've lived in California for 65 years and have traveled extensively. I am not a truck driver but our son Michael has been driving based out of California for just over 2 years. I often think of leaving the state because of high income and sales taxes and politics. I stay here because of the weather, economic opportunity, and relatives.

Pacific Pearl states trucks are restricted to right lane only. That is not correct. There are some areas where there are lane restrictions (like anywhere) but trucks freely use a lane for passing. Some trucks stay in the middle lane for long stretches, particularly when going through cities with cars entering the freeway. The speed limit for trucks and vehicles pulling trailers is 55 MPH but that is not strictly enforced. Michael is governed at 65 driving for Marten and regularly drives over 60 when in California (he has zero tickets, etc.). I think pretty much anyone who is driving safely will be fine. AB5 is a non-issue for you if you plan to be a company driver as you've been doing. Traffic is about as bad in the large cities of California as they are in any city in the U.S. Michael regularly drives through Los Angeles either headed to or from northern California to Riverside County and I don't believe he's ever had a delay of any great significance, just stretches going 25-30 MPH. He has stayed at truck stops in Lebec (top of Grapefine), Bakersfield, Lost Hills, Flag City (I-5 and Highway 12), and Orland plus some others, I'm sure. Michael's regional route is usually between northern and southern California and to Utah but sometimes to Idaho, Oregon, and Washington (passing through Las Vegas with deliveries there sometimes). Michael's only complaint about California is "it's too dang hot". His luck was hotter weather in Portland, Oregon when he made a delivery there so California seemed better.

California does require employers to pay for some sick pay (3 days a year) and Michael gets a small amount on each paycheck for that.

Housing is very expensive in California but more "reasonable" in the Central Valley. Areas more than 1.5-2 hours from the large metropolitan areas have lower housing prices. Michael is based out of Stockton (45 minutes from home) and prices are more modest there.

Overall, the economy in California has been more resilient than most other states due to a diverse economy. The state presently has a $70 billion budget surplus that leaders are finding out creative ways to waste on stupid ideas. We have very high fuel prices due to high fuel taxes but us pawns will supposedly get a rebate for some of that before long.

If weather is important to you and you can afford housing here, I think the opportunities are fine. We have numerous family friends who have had careers in trucking here. The politics sucks but you can make an effort to tune that out and focus on all of the good things in your life.

Someday PackRat may even come for a visit and I would enjoy talking to him about it and maybe take him out shooting, etc. :) Yes, people do own firearms in California, LOL.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

PackRat's Comment
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Don, according to PackRat, California is not part of the United States. So you may need dual citizenship. Lol

46 other states to pick from. CA and NY are anti- success stories.

Pacific Pearl's Comment
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Pacific Pearl states trucks are restricted to right lane only. That is not correct.

California Vehicle Code Section 21654 states that any vehicle on a highway that must proceed at a slower speed than normal traffic moving in the same direction must use the right-hand lane or stay as close as possible to the right-hand edge of the curb. The only exceptions are if the vehicle is overtaking and passing another car proceeding in the same direction or the vehicle is making a left turn. Since large trucks are legally required to travel no faster than 55 miles per hour, they may only be driven in the right lane on highways, except when the law allows otherwise

I've lived in California for 65 years .... I am not a truck driver...

That explains.... A LOT.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

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Don, according to PackRat, California is not part of the United States. So you may need dual citizenship. Lol

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46 other states to pick from. CA and NY are anti- success stories.

Make it 45; NIX Florida, as well...haha! (Sorry, Steve L. !) It's not a good 'freight lane' state for most; among other things. I bounced between NY (born) and Florida (raised) before I landed in a GREAT STATE, !

~ Anne ~

Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

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Pacific Pearl states trucks are restricted to right lane only. That is not correct.

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California Vehicle Code Section 21654 states that any vehicle on a highway that must proceed at a slower speed than normal traffic moving in the same direction must use the right-hand lane or stay as close as possible to the right-hand edge of the curb. The only exceptions are if the vehicle is overtaking and passing another car proceeding in the same direction or the vehicle is making a left turn. Since large trucks are legally required to travel no faster than 55 miles per hour, they may only be driven in the right lane on highways, except when the law allows otherwise

double-quotes-start.png

I've lived in California for 65 years .... I am not a truck driver...

double-quotes-end.png

That explains.... A LOT.

Maybe your comprehension is lacking. Trucks drive in middle lanes frequently and are not driving slower than the rest of traffic. I've driven on I-5 in California for 35 years or so and am speaking from experience.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Legally Harvey?

Read the entire vehicle code Pacific Pearl posted… specifically last few sentences. Unless stated otherwise by signage, it’s illegal for a semi to drive in the passing lane.

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Pacific Pearl states trucks are restricted to right lane only. That is not correct.

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California Vehicle Code Section 21654 states that any vehicle on a highway that must proceed at a slower speed than normal traffic moving in the same direction must use the right-hand lane or stay as close as possible to the right-hand edge of the curb. The only exceptions are if the vehicle is overtaking and passing another car proceeding in the same direction or the vehicle is making a left turn. Since large trucks are legally required to travel no faster than 55 miles per hour, they may only be driven in the right lane on highways, except when the law allows otherwise

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I've lived in California for 65 years .... I am not a truck driver...

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

That explains.... A LOT.

double-quotes-end.png

Maybe your comprehension is lacking. Trucks drive in middle lanes frequently and are not driving slower than the rest of traffic. I've driven on I-5 in California for 35 years or so and am speaking from experience.

Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

Legally Harvey?

Read the entire vehicle code Pacific Pearl posted… specifically last few sentences. Unless stated otherwise by signage, it’s illegal for a semi to drive in the passing lane.

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Pacific Pearl states trucks are restricted to right lane only. That is not correct.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

California Vehicle Code Section 21654 states that any vehicle on a highway that must proceed at a slower speed than normal traffic moving in the same direction must use the right-hand lane or stay as close as possible to the right-hand edge of the curb. The only exceptions are if the vehicle is overtaking and passing another car proceeding in the same direction or the vehicle is making a left turn. Since large trucks are legally required to travel no faster than 55 miles per hour, they may only be driven in the right lane on highways, except when the law allows otherwise

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I've lived in California for 65 years .... I am not a truck driver...

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

That explains.... A LOT.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Maybe your comprehension is lacking. Trucks drive in middle lanes frequently and are not driving slower than the rest of traffic. I've driven on I-5 in California for 35 years or so and am speaking from experience.

double-quotes-end.png

Yes, legally. That code pertains to all vehicles, not just trucks. No vehicle can impede traffic unless in the right lane unless they are passing.

Here is a photo I just took on the Oakland Bay bridge riding as a passenger (was under anesthesia a little while ago). This truck was driving the speed limit and not impeding traffic so he is legal in the lane he in.

0893148001661899452.jpg

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