PC Under Load.

Topic 32269 | Page 2

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Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Tonight I pulled into a rest area off Interstate 70 in Illinois. This was during regulation time and I planned to do my 10 there. Big sign on the way in says: NO OVERNIGHT PARKING. So I mosey down the road, run out of time, put myself on PC until I get to the next rest area. I don’t care if that was legal or not. Didn’t have any choice.

You actually could have put yourself in PC right from that rest area because you were attempting to park, but couldn't. Simply put a note in log, "overnight parking not allowed," then PC to the very next spot for parking. You can legally do this until you reach a spot that has safe and legal parking. You are not advancing the load because you are looking for parking. You are in violation if you drive in the direction of your destination to park if there is a place in another direction that is closer where you could park. When I run into this. I put myself off duty and sit at the spot where I tried to park and use Trucker Path app to see where the closest spots are to park. The app shows what drivers are reporting, as far as parking availability. If a "closer" spot requires you to drive several miles down the highway to exit and go back the opposite direction, that really isn't closer. Use common sense in that regard. Basically, if there is a rest area that is 5 miles behind me that requires that I get to the other side of the interstate, with a total distance driven of 10 miles, and another parking spot that is 8 miles up the road in front of me, I am going 8 miles up the road. Is that what the FMCSA regulation says I am to do? Technically, no, but the regulation doesn't take into account real world situations. If I am trying to park, I am tired. I am going to find a place that I can get to the soonest to park. The longer I remain on the road, the more of a danger I pose to the public, once tired.

The point being that once you have chosen a place to try park, go off duty and don't go back on duty. Use PC to get to a place to park, if the lot where you tried to stop is full. That's one of the intended purposes of PC. It's not your choice to continue driving, at that point and you are not advancing the load.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I'm not sure what it aligns with Ryan, but I'm sure you would disagree with what I posted.

Do you think you have stayed at more rest areas than I? I forgot you've experienced most everything, but I'll wager your number is much, much lower.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

Ryan says.

Basically, if there is a rest area that is 5 miles behind me that requires that I get to the other side of the interstate , with a total distance driven of 10 miles, and another parking spot that is 8 miles up the road in front of me, I am going 8 miles up the road. Is that what the FMCSA regulation says I am to do?

Actually that is exactly what the FMCA guidance says if you would have read it.

8 miles is closer than 10 miles.

Also if you follow the link there is guidance that says you don't have to return to the prior on duty location. Meaning that if you PC to find safe parking you don't have to return to your prior location. That's always been a discussion about if you have to turn around and go back to your prior on duty location.

My recommendation to anyone reading this: if you don't understand PC don't use it.

Also if you don't understand PC or if you can't read what the FMCA is says don't try to tell others how to use it.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Tonight I pulled into a rest area off Interstate 70 in Illinois. This was during regulation time and I planned to do my 10 there. Big sign on the way in says: NO OVERNIGHT PARKING. So I mosey down the road, run out of time, put myself on PC until I get to the next rest area. I don’t care if that was legal or not. Didn’t have any choice.

double-quotes-end.png

I've never gotten a knock on the door in any state to move because I was parked somewhere too long.

I've never gotten a knock on the door in any state to move because I was parked somewhere too long.

I'm curious about this. Neither have I been told to move from a rest area, but here's what I'm wondering; in some places (especially South Carolina), I see signs that say "No Overnight Parking," but I've also been told (by non-Law Enforcement peeps) this is just to prevent camping and doesn't pertain to trucks. Anyone know the truth?

Thanks!

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Another interesting topic. I swear a learn more about trucking here than anywhere.

I understand PC, to a degree. I don't use it unless I'm certain I can. I will PC from my weekend parking spot to the house if I have to do it. Our company policy is no more than 20 miles of PC. My house is 5.5 miles away from thee. We can't advance the load, regardless of what the reg says.

The only appointment I've missed in my short six months of regional solo driving was when I knew I would run out of time when I made it to the consignee and would have to PC at least 18 miles out of there because there wasn't any overnight parking at the facility. This was only because I spent six hours on the docks at the shipper. Now, I could have made it there with about 10 minutes on my clock, then tried to pc out that night, then back in the morning. But it's a lengthy check-in process. I may have had to PC into the dock. Negatory...not going to do it. So, I shut down about 30 minutes shy of the facility. I wasn't happy about not making the same-day delivery. And I'm sure no one else was either.

I don't like to operate in gray areas. This old new rookie is sticking with the knowns and the basics until he has more experience! LOL

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

TCB's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all of the input guys. The shipper was really fast. I ended up doing a split sleeper and was able to drive 100 miles. If I would have done pc, I would have only been able to drive 25 miles per company policy, and would be fighting for parking in Boise at 1800.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all of the input guys. The shipper was really fast. I ended up doing a split sleeper and was able to drive 100 miles. If I would have done pc, I would have only been able to drive 25 miles per company policy, and would be fighting for parking in Boise at 1800.

You would have been fine finding a place. Mr Gas off exit 59A usually has spots even after midnight. Always have found a spot after delivering at WinCo DC at 0100.

Or, go past the WinCo DC, turn right at the dead end, go to round circle end of road, come back along fence beside WinCo and park. There is usually some spots.

Should have hollered.... I would have bought you coffee and given you a shortcut to 93. I live in Buhl, 1 mile from the shortcut, bypassing the stupid traffic in Twin Falls. 😆

Laura

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

BK's Comment
member avatar

I have to admit that I’m very much a rebel without a pause about PC regulations. Two days in a row I have tried to find parking and found the truck stop and rest area where I planned to park full to overflowing. Rather than park on entry ramps, I put myself on PC and went off route to nearby little towns where I found safe and cozy parking. In doing so, did I advance my load? Yes I did by a few miles. Am I worried? Heck no. I know my company will not bust my chops about technicalities. I try to abide by the rules, but there are times when we have to just use common sense and do what is safe and prudent, FMSCA be damned.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

David D.'s Comment
member avatar

Read the regulations and decide for yourself and know your companies policies too.

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-service/personal-conveyance

This is one of the biggest problems with our industry. You have more freedoms than you think.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

From what I've seen and experienced, I agree. But if the policy of the MC is more restrictive than FMCSA rules, the driver is probably obligated to abide by said policy. One would think.

Personal Conveyance

Question 26: Under what circumstances may a driver operate a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) as a personal conveyance? Guidance: A driver may record time operating a CMV for personal conveyance (i.e., for personal use or reasons) as off-duty only when the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work by the motor carrier. The CMV may be used for personal conveyance even if it is laden, since the load is not being transported for the commercial benefit of the carrier at that time. Personal conveyance does not reduce a driver’s or motor carrier’s responsibility to operate a CMV safely. Motor carriers can establish personal conveyance limitations either within the scope of, or more restrictive than, this guidance, such as banning use of a CMV for personal conveyance purposes, imposing a distance limitation on personal conveyance, or prohibiting personal conveyance while the CMV is laden.

Read the regulations and decide for yourself and know your companies policies too.

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-service/personal-conveyance

This is one of the biggest problems with our industry. You have more freedoms than you think.

Commercial Motor Vehicle:

A commercial motor vehicle is any vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers or property with either:

  • A gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • A gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more which includes a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds
  • CSA:

    Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

    The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

    FMCSA:

    Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

    The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

    What Does The FMCSA Do?

    • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
    • Data and Analysis
    • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
    • Research and Technology
    • Safety Assistance
    • Support and Information Sharing

    DOT:

    Department Of Transportation

    A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

    State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

    CMV:

    Commercial Motor Vehicle

    A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

    • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
    • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
    • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
    • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
    • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

    Fm:

    Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

    The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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