Duckwalk

Topic 32290 | Page 2

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Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Duckwalking.

As someone preparing for school, is this something I need to practice? Do all truckers need to be able to do this? Or only certain companies? Gimme the scoop.

I haven't ever had to do it. I am pretty short, so I suppose it's not necessary for me to see under trailers and such. Unless you are working for a company where you are unloading at the customer, I wouldn't worry too much about it. I never touch freight (reefer), and I didn't do any physical fitness test upon hire. Every company is different in this regard.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
I haven't ever had to do it. I am pretty short, so I suppose it's not necessary for me to see under trailers and such

How do you climb under your trailer to inspect the jaws are fully around your king pin? How do you get underneath to inspect your inside tires or brakes?

Or do you not do that stuff??

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I haven't ever had to do it. I am pretty short, so I suppose it's not necessary for me to see under trailers and such

double-quotes-end.png

How do you climb under your trailer to inspect the jaws are fully around your king pin? How do you get underneath to inspect your inside tires or brakes?

Or do you not do that stuff??

I bend over at the waist. I am short enough that I don't have to bend my knees.

Or do I not do it? I will let that slide. Doesn't apply, let it fly, is what I say.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Or do I not do it? I will let that slide. Doesn't apply, let it fly, is what I say

Cool story. Based on your posts lately it wouldn't surprise me. You've made it sound like it's acceptable to run over your hours to deliver a load, and now tonight that weighing your load isn't necessary because weigh stations should be closed. While yes that's true in many places its not true everywhere. If I hurt your feelings I don't give a damn. This forum is primarily geared towards helping those interested in a career and helping guide them through their rookie year and beyond. When we see someone giving advice that may negatively impact anothers career we'll call you on it every time. Weigh stations in my region lately have been randomly popping up at night and there's been an increase in DOT officers sitting on the interstate. Nights is all I drive. You seem to add all sorts of risks to yourself for a measly few dollars. If that's what you choose to do great, it's your cdl not mine. I draw the line where what a rookie will read what you've posted and think it's acceptable. At trucking truth we have a reputation to keep.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar
I bend over at the waist. I am short enough that I don't have to bend my knees.

I can actually do that, too!!! I can see better with a duck walk, however; my face isn't down.

NOW, who of y'all can LIMBO under the trailer like Ms. Laura (IDMtnGal?)

rofl-3.gif dancing-dog.gif rofl-3.gif

There's GOTTA be pix of her/that, somewhere . . . Pack ?!?!?

~ Anne ~

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bumping this… couldn’t agree more Rob.

He’s way more rogue then we want or need here… offering contrarian advice more so than not…

double-quotes-start.png

Or do I not do it? I will let that slide. Doesn't apply, let it fly, is what I say

double-quotes-end.png

Cool story. Based on your posts lately it wouldn't surprise me. You've made it sound like it's acceptable to run over your hours to deliver a load, and now tonight that weighing your load isn't necessary because weigh stations should be closed. While yes that's true in many places its not true everywhere. If I hurt your feelings I don't give a damn. This forum is primarily geared towards helping those interested in a career and helping guide them through their rookie year and beyond. When we see someone giving advice that may negatively impact anothers career we'll call you on it every time. Weigh stations in my region lately have been randomly popping up at night and there's been an increase in DOT officers sitting on the interstate. Nights is all I drive. You seem to add all sorts of risks to yourself for a measly few dollars. If that's what you choose to do great, it's your cdl not mine. I draw the line where what a rookie will read what you've posted and think it's acceptable. At trucking truth we have a reputation to keep.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

I duckwalk under the trailer with a bright flashlight every single time. I once had a driver tell me that the duck walk is “dangerous” and that all you need to do is tug on the trailer till the drive tires spin. Great way to beat up equipment. Also It’s pure laziness if you’re not getting under to check.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Bumping this… couldn’t agree more Rob.

He’s way more rogue then we want or need here… offering contrarian advice more so than not…

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Or do I not do it? I will let that slide. Doesn't apply, let it fly, is what I say

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Cool story. Based on your posts lately it wouldn't surprise me. You've made it sound like it's acceptable to run over your hours to deliver a load, and now tonight that weighing your load isn't necessary because weigh stations should be closed. While yes that's true in many places its not true everywhere. If I hurt your feelings I don't give a damn. This forum is primarily geared towards helping those interested in a career and helping guide them through their rookie year and beyond. When we see someone giving advice that may negatively impact anothers career we'll call you on it every time. Weigh stations in my region lately have been randomly popping up at night and there's been an increase in DOT officers sitting on the interstate. Nights is all I drive. You seem to add all sorts of risks to yourself for a measly few dollars. If that's what you choose to do great, it's your cdl not mine. I draw the line where what a rookie will read what you've posted and think it's acceptable. At trucking truth we have a reputation to keep.

double-quotes-end.png

I agree 100%. Do it the right way every time and there will be better results. Take shortcuts, cut corners, act stupid and reap what is sown. Hoping for the best when doing the least is never a plan for success, and probably a road leading to a short, failed career. Maybe even worse.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Bumping this… couldn’t agree more Rob.

He’s way more rogue then we want or need here… offering contrarian advice more so than not…

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Or do I not do it? I will let that slide. Doesn't apply, let it fly, is what I say

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Cool story. Based on your posts lately it wouldn't surprise me. You've made it sound like it's acceptable to run over your hours to deliver a load, and now tonight that weighing your load isn't necessary because weigh stations should be closed. While yes that's true in many places its not true everywhere. If I hurt your feelings I don't give a damn. This forum is primarily geared towards helping those interested in a career and helping guide them through their rookie year and beyond. When we see someone giving advice that may negatively impact anothers career we'll call you on it every time. Weigh stations in my region lately have been randomly popping up at night and there's been an increase in DOT officers sitting on the interstate. Nights is all I drive. You seem to add all sorts of risks to yourself for a measly few dollars. If that's what you choose to do great, it's your cdl not mine. I draw the line where what a rookie will read what you've posted and think it's acceptable. At trucking truth we have a reputation to keep.

double-quotes-end.png

Would be nice if my responses giving better representation of what I am saying were posted.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Would be nice if my responses giving better representation of what I am saying were posted.

It would be nice if you would give solid advice that doesn't mislead or insult anyone. It would be nice if we didn't have to spend two hours a day proofreading everything you say to see if it's acceptable or not.

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