Best Route To Take To Be A Local Driver In South Florida?

Topic 32344 | Page 1

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James L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello, so I have my class A permit and am currently looking to either get a grant to go to school and try to find employment myself after or try to find a company that will train me then hire me straight after. Unfortunately I can't go over the road because of personal circumstances. Thing is, I live in Fort Lauderdale area (about an hour north of Miami) and there are not many companies around me that will do that. So ideally I am trying to be local and the only company I see near me is XPO and I am going to reach out tomorrow. If no luck I suppose I will go the food/beverage service route. If anyone sees this that lives in soflo and has any advice I'd really appreciate it. Thanks

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I was in a similar situation and I went local out the gate. I got my permit and applied to FedEx freight's driver apprentice program.

The problem your going to face, at least in LTL is the freight levels dropping and everything slowing down with inflation levels increasing. FedEx recently announced they were going to slow down their hiring efforts. It looks like things are going to get worse before they get better.

If you're afforded an opportunity, take it and run with it. Just be advised that LTL company models follow seniorty order and you probably won't be working much. I have friends that work for Estes and Old Dominion that are having the same issues we're having at FedEx. They're working 3 or 4 days a week.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

LTL would be a wonderful thing to get into but it's highly unlikely given your area. You can really only run north out of your area which really limits how many drivers are needed. When i lived in St Pete 5 years ago the LTLs wanted a minimum of 3 years experience. Sysco has started helping people get their CDL atleast in Palmetto (across the skyway from St Pete). Not sure of the details, but that's very physical labor not many can handle.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Hello, so I have my class A permit and am currently looking to either get a grant to go to school and try to find employment myself after or try to find a company that will train me then hire me straight after. Unfortunately I can't go over the road because of personal circumstances. Thing is, I live in Fort Lauderdale area (about an hour north of Miami) and there are not many companies around me that will do that. So ideally I am trying to be local and the only company I see near me is XPO and I am going to reach out tomorrow. If no luck I suppose I will go the food/beverage service route. If anyone sees this that lives in soflo and has any advice I'd really appreciate it. Thanks

Howdy, James!!

Welcome to Trucking Truth... great folks here, man. First of all; I get ya. I'm from Florida (after NY.) PLEASE put your location in your profile; helps us help you, at a glance! Ft. Laurderdale is gorgeous, I used to deliver SeaRay stuff .. propellers and parts within the state, for General Propeller and Miami Propeller. It was all 'deemed' hotshot however, as I was under 26,001 GVWR; no CDL required. Loved it.

Read these links as you have time ~

^^^ These will definitely open your eyes, to the industry as a whole!! :) ^^^

I was in a similar situation and I went local out the gate. I got my permit and applied to FedEx freight's driver apprentice program.

The problem your going to face, at least in LTL is the freight levels dropping and everything slowing down with inflation levels increasing. FedEx recently announced they were going to slow down their hiring efforts. It looks like things are going to get worse before they get better.

If you're afforded an opportunity, take it and run with it. Just be advised that LTL company models follow seniorty order and you probably won't be working much. I have friends that work for Estes and Old Dominion that are having the same issues we're having at FedEx. They're working 3 or 4 days a week.

^^^^ This, O/P, is SOOOOO spot on. My husband is looking for a new job to call home. . . due to a leveraged buyout, and we are seeing striae in the LTL world, from the outside also....even with 19 years driving experience!

{{{BANKS is mi mano . . . when it comes to all things LTL job searching, jsyk!}}}

Regarding Florida and Home Daily; you COULD check with Cypress in Jacksonville. They ARE, indeed... a training school. As far as intrastate only, I couldn't tell you. It's really hard to put a bead on with ANY larger company; so much is flipping script around right now in many places!

Here's the link; ask for Pete or Clay, and mention Trucking Truth .. Cypress Truck Lines; Flatbed ~ Free Training.

Another truck line up here in Ohio that trains as well, is Dutch Maid Logistics. They have a farm/facility in Sarasota, Florida; and have been planning (for some time) to also open a training hub there; or partner with someone nearby, ie: SRQ Tech College. I've helped a few great guys get on with them; still there. It's reefer hauling.

You can speak to Allison or Sam easily; and mention Trucking Truth to them also: Dutch Maid Logistics

Regarding LTL, I've spoken with YRC (Yellow Freight) and they've got training (paid) programs going on in different places at different times. You'll have to task yourself with the Florida hunt, but here's the link to look'see:

Might have to work the docks, and even P&D for a bit tho: Drive 4 YRC! Training Available at No Cost.

Something, for the time being, hope it helps. PLEASE add at least home state in your profile!!! Thanks.

Best to ya, stop back;

~ Anne ~

ps: Apply for the WIOA grant ASAP, it'll take some time, especially in Florida. If you don't use/need it, no harm no foul.

pps: Read Rob T.'s diary, re: Food Delivery. He had a unique way in, and it worked; he's kickin' it & killin' it $ wise! Here's a link to his posts/threads: Rob T. 's Diary and Posts; great info!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

WIOA:

WIOA - Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (aka WIA)

Formerly known as the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), the WIOA was established in 1998 to prepare youth, adults and dislocated workers for entry and reentry into the workforce. WIOA training funds are designed to serve laid-off individuals, older youth and adults who are in need of training to enter or reenter the labor market. A lot of truck drivers get funding for their CDL training through WIOA.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

GVWR:

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

GVWR is the maximum operating weight of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer, minus any trailers.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

James L.,

Welcome to the wonderful world of truck drivers. I worked for Conway Freight for 14 years out of Orlando before it became XPO and I know that terminal well. Be advised that if you do get hired on at XPO you will be doing a lot of dock work and there is no guarantee of a 40 hour week. Once you make seniority and have a chance to bid on a run it gets better. Like most all positions with an LTL company you will be driving to different terminals within the company range and usually home every day depending on the bid. Good luck.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar
am currently looking to either get a grant to go to school

Since you’re planning to attend a local school, why not go in ahead of time and ask them who hires out of their school?

That should give you some idea for your area.

James L.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, I've looked into LTL and there are quite a few companies near me but I cannot find any ones that do driver training programs specifically in my area. And I wish I could travel but can't at the moment otherwise I would do OTR. Seems like the odds are against me..

LTL would be a wonderful thing to get into but it's highly unlikely given your area. You can really only run north out of your area which really limits how many drivers are needed. When i lived in St Pete 5 years ago the LTLs wanted a minimum of 3 years experience. Sysco has started helping people get their CDL atleast in Palmetto (across the skyway from St Pete). Not sure of the details, but that's very physical labor not many can handle.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Yes, I've looked into LTL and there are quite a few companies near me but I cannot find any ones that do driver training programs specifically in my area. And I wish I could travel but can't at the moment otherwise I would do OTR. Seems like the odds are against me..

double-quotes-start.png

LTL would be a wonderful thing to get into but it's highly unlikely given your area. You can really only run north out of your area which really limits how many drivers are needed. When i lived in St Pete 5 years ago the LTLs wanted a minimum of 3 years experience. Sysco has started helping people get their CDL atleast in Palmetto (across the skyway from St Pete). Not sure of the details, but that's very physical labor not many can handle.

double-quotes-end.png

Any luck, James?

Have you looked into FedEx dock to driver training programs? I'm not sure of your exact location; you should put it in your profile; but there are FedEx yards/facilites near everyone, more less.

Another one; have you looked into YRC? They're popping up training all over the place(s!)

You can look and see what may be coming to a location, near you: YRC/Yellow ~ training dates.

Also, the advice below, is sage. Some schools may partner with a facility you don't even know about, until you ask. We just found out that Keller is partnering with Trainco, after closing their own training facility a few years back.

If you really want this, you've gotta work it!

~ Anne ~

double-quotes-start.png

am currently looking to either get a grant to go to school

double-quotes-end.png

Since you’re planning to attend a local school, why not go in ahead of time and ask them who hires out of their school?

That should give you some idea for your area.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Yes, I've looked into LTL and there are quite a few companies near me but I cannot find any ones that do driver training programs specifically in my area. And I wish I could travel but can't at the moment otherwise I would do OTR. Seems like the odds are against me..

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

LTL would be a wonderful thing to get into but it's highly unlikely given your area. You can really only run north out of your area which really limits how many drivers are needed. When i lived in St Pete 5 years ago the LTLs wanted a minimum of 3 years experience. Sysco has started helping people get their CDL atleast in Palmetto (across the skyway from St Pete). Not sure of the details, but that's very physical labor not many can handle.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Any luck, James?

Have you looked into FedEx dock to driver training programs? I'm not sure of your exact location; you should put it in your profile; but there are FedEx yards/facilites near everyone, more less.

Another one; have you looked into YRC? They're popping up training all over the place(s!)

You can look and see what may be coming to a location, near you: YRC/Yellow ~ training dates.

Also, the advice below, is sage. Some schools may partner with a facility you don't even know about, until you ask. We just found out that Keller is partnering with Trainco, after closing their own training facility a few years back.

If you really want this, you've gotta work it!

~ Anne ~

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

am currently looking to either get a grant to go to school

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Since you’re planning to attend a local school, why not go in ahead of time and ask them who hires out of their school?

That should give you some idea for your area.

double-quotes-end.png

SAIA would be a decent option for Florida, too. They also have a dock to driver program.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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