May Need Help Moving On From Roehl

Topic 32371 | Page 2

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Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
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I recently completed all initial training with Roehl's GYCDL program and have been waiting over two weeks to be assigned a truck with a lot of mixed messages along the way about when and where I am going to actually pick up the truck from. I live an hour east of Roehl's terminal in Appleton, Wisconsin (which is where I did GYCDL) and was informed by my management a week ago that I was to return to Appleton at the beginning of this week to pick up my new truck. That day I was informed that I was not going to be picking up my truck in Appleton but rather at their Marshfield, Wisconsin terminal the next day. So I drive two and a half hours to get to Marshfield the next day and as soon as I arrive I get a phone call from management telling me that I am now going to need to fly to Dallas to pick up a new truck from their Dallas terminal. Mind you that they had about a dozen new Freightliner Cascadias prepped and ready at Marshfield but apparently none of those were for me.

Now I'm just sitting waiting on more information about some potential flight to Dallas. A big problem is that I have all my stuff ready to transfer into my new truck in my personal vehicle and I can take very little of it on a flight. So I'll have to be routed back to Wisconsin to get all my stuff and I don't know how long that will take.

If for some reason things continue to not work out I'm going to request that my contract be rendered null and void due to the fact that Roehl is not enabling me to fulfill the terms of said contract and I will refuse to pay $7,000 for my GYCDL debt obligation. I understand that there is a truck shortage but honestly I've been led to believe so many things over the past week that I'm very distraught that the company simply cannot get their things together and keep feeding me bad information.

So I have a CDL-A and experience of basic company training, what are the best options for OTR in the event that I need to look at another company to work with?

Howdy, Unk; welcome to TT !

You probably should've stopped in and said howdy before the above conundrum, but . . . welcome, all the same! The above advice is spot on, but in the meantime, here's an example of what you may encounter:

0197521001663806934.jpg

The (high) courts have ruled this (and others just like it, with a different heading) legal AND enforceable. In the old days, it was called .. well, nevermind. It still IS that word 'b.b'ing' in effect, yet deemeed totally legal.

Wish you well,

~ Anne & Tom ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Well, Mr Uncle, for another thing, all those new and pretty trucks sitting at every terminal , don't just go right randomly out to ANY drivers..... Each DM , is assigned certain trucks out of the new ones, to distribute, to HIS drivers. So, in essence, the DM's are assigned those pretty new trucks in the yard. Some have yet to be inspected, licensed, and insured, and without plates even on em yet.

My 2nd company, after driving 22 months with my 1st company, did give me a brand spankin' new 2022 truck with 2678 miles on it....I felt great, and appreciative, and took extra care of that truck my whole 4 months there, until fully retiring. I did finally have to swing by their Phoenix terminal, to get my plate, tags and IFTA stickers, to install.....

Suck it up buttercup, and things WILL, work out, they have tons of drivers to deal with. I "almost" went with them, when I started out. Because of their reputation.....

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Issue 1)

IF you get a NEW truck, consider yourself blessed as a driver with no experience, whether you get it in 1 day or it takes a month+.

Issue 2)

Be prepared to get a used truck that you have to clean out yourself and point out some repair issues to the shop.

Issue 3)

Have you asked dispatch at your assigned terminal for clarification on why things keep changing? Don't jump to conclusions and just ask for clarification on why plans keep getting switched up.

Issue 4)

After having that conversation, whether you think the reason for plans changing is a sufficient one or not, get on that plane and start being a professional driver.

Issue 5)

Welcome to trucking. Be prepared for anything and everything. The more you make yourself an asset for Roehl, the more those who do the work to support you will help you when you need it. Your first year+, you are going to need it, much more than you expect. If you don't have patience right now, this industry will force you into learning patience.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Uncle Truckus's Comment
member avatar

Just so we're clear I should have no problem with them telling me to go to Appleton to pick up my newly truck assigned truck and when I get there there is no truck?

Just so we're clear I should have no problem with them telling me, after I've gone to Appleton, to go to Marshfield to pick up my newly truck assigned truck and when I get there there is no truck?

I'm not demanding a brand new truck, I do have an expectation that if information is conveyed to me that it be accurate. Apparently it is no big deal that I have bills to pay and other obligations in life that I have to put on hold. It appears that venting my frustration and looking for answers equates to me being entitled.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Uh yeah, you come across as entitled, just so we're clear.

Things in trucking are a constant change. Weather, appointments, routes, loads get canceled, days off, etc. Learn to adapt you'll be done quickly. You're also on the hook for the training fees in that contract you signed, just so we're clear.

BK's Comment
member avatar

Uh yeah, you come across as entitled, just so we're clear.

Things in trucking are a constant change. Weather, appointments, routes, loads get canceled, days off, etc. Learn to adapt you'll be done quickly. You're also on the hook for the training fees in that contract you signed, just so we're clear.

This has not yet happened to me, even when I worked for Schneider, but I have read numerous experiences here on TT about drivers who had to chase down an empty trailer at multiple locations. Just to be clear, I think the last one I remember was Banks being sent all over the place for basically an entire day.

smile.gif confused.gif

Scott M's Comment
member avatar

Uncle- “Just to be clear”. If you decide to buck the system.. IOW to not do what you said by not fulfilling CRST contract..THIS is great. You will now learn the hard way. You’ve gotten great advice by many people. It’ll be interesting what you write a year from now. I’ll make a prophetic statement- “The whole world will now come crashing on your entitled head”.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Just to be clear.... If you read my comment about asking for compensation for driving those miles from point to point... Then that is acceptable and would add to paying your bills.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

You wanted us to agree with you that Roehl is giving you the run around shaft. Some of the people answering you have barely a year experience, some are still waiting to start school and others of us have years of experience. I have been out here over 13 years during two different time frames with 20 plus years difference. Let me tell you, it hasn't really changed. We used to get run around when we were given bad directions and back in the 90s there were no computers or cell phones to check out where you were at. I've been out the second time since 2014 and it's the same old stuff, but now we can check different things. Has Kearsey said, if you fueled up running around, turn in your receipts and turn in your mileage to help defray these costs. We all have bills in our life, that's why it's 71 I'm still driving. I just know to talk with my dispatcher and usually will get some compensation for my time and effort.

Don't know how old you are, but your second post definitely shows your attitude and hopefully you will make it in this business but you will have to change your mindset drastically.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Travis's Comment
member avatar

I got a 2022 with 67k miles and while it's nice it is missing the "side guard assist" and the "drive assist." I assume due to chip or circuit board shortages.

Even has a big sign on the dash "side guard assist is disabled on this vehicle"

Welcome to trucking. I laughed out loud at the "refuse to pay" line. I would request mileage pay and or layover pay for running back and forth between terminals though. Get rid of any expectations you have right now. Go with the flow.

Get past the entitled "they had brand new cascadia" sitting there. A new driver is more likely to be placed in a truck that has some miles on it so when they wreck it.... And probably will do some damage their first year... It isn't as big of a loss. Often new trucks are saved for experienced drivers as sort of a reward. My company allows a million Mile safe driver to order their truck...so what makes you think I should give up my rewarded truck for a new driver who wants to give up before he even turns a key by himself?

"I know there is a truck shortage". Dude you have no idea had bad the shortage is right now. I know for a fact that I wouldn't be able to get a brand new truck right now... And honestly wouldn't want one cause many "covid" trucks are junk. My company just had 200 people waiting for trucks because a shipment of expected trucks didn't come in.

I already know where this is going... So be forewarned.... It may need work. It may need to be cleaned. Prime puts ours through a detail shop and even then we often still have to shop it. This is trucking. It's no problem for them to route you back home for your stuff. This happens all the time.

Good luck and keep an open mind. You signed a contract. Even if they terminate you, you are still responsible for that $7,000. Read the contract.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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