HOS Brain Teaser For Fun

Topic 32416 | Page 2

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BK's Comment
member avatar

68 mph max 60 mph average speed (assumed) 30 minutes fuel stop / DOT break 45 minutes lost in construction traffic 744 miles total

Start clock driving at midnight after an Off Duty Walk-around inspection.

Assume 10.25 hours driving time completed at 60mph = 615 miles.

Shut down at ~11:45am for 10-h break after a 15 minutes On Duty Inspection.

Resume driving at 9:45pm at 60 mph average speed.

Complete 135 miles at midnight

Total miles = 615 + 135 = 750 in 24 hour day.

The math isn’t perfect, but does show how it could be done based upon the info that you provided.

I’ve had a couple calendar days like this where I legally drove over 12 hours to bet over 600 miles. My truck governed at 62. Typically cruise at 60 mph.

Dennis, you nailed it! Wow, you have my admiration. This is the first time this has ever happened to me. The 743.6 miles were the compilation of driving during two shifts in a twenty four hour time frame. Now that the cat’s out of the bag, maybe someone can explain it better than me. But Dennis, you explained it perfectly!

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
BK's Comment
member avatar

Did you hit an unpredicted weather event which allowed you to extend your clock past the normal limits?

Sandman, no exceptions were involved. It’s a trick question. See how Dennis L explained it.

This was just for fun, but educational also.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

Yep, I see it now. Good catch, Dennis, and good game, BK!

BK's Comment
member avatar

BTW, there have been some recent questions about driving reefer. If you look at my 8 day picture from my HOS , you will see that my hours and miles vary wildly. It’s the nature of the beast. What that screen shot doesn’t show is detention time (with pay) and layover pay. And even though some days I don’t get abundant hours, the other pay helps make up the difference.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

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This has been bugging me since you posted your 8-days Summary. PackRat tried to point out the issue with your On Duty and Driving times being the same each day from 9/27.

I understand the rule to be that the DOT expects to see an On Duty Vehicle Inspection logged each calendar day, unless you are truly Off Duty all day.

Fueling is also an On Duty activity.

I typically log a 10 to 15 minutes On Duty Vehicle Inspection at the end of my drive shift (post trip). My pre-trip is Off Duty Walk-around.

In days when I fuel I will combine an On Duty Fueling and Vehicle Inspection log entry.

Therefore you should always have a minimum of 10 to 15 minutes more On Duty time than Driving time. Customer appointments should add a few more On Duty minutes for check in and maybe some Yard Movement as they occur.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BK's Comment
member avatar

Dennis, you and PackRat make a valid point about the log not allowing for pre/post trip time. On this particular trip, I was really under the gun to make the appointment time. With my company, I’m allowed to fuel off duty. And I didn’t log my inspections because even though I did them, I didn’t want to use clock time up. As it is, I made the appointment with 15 minutes to spare. Now before anybody gets their Fruit of the Looms in a twist, this was not typical of what I do. Normally I do log the pre/post trip inspections. But my company is OK with this happening once in a while, so I did it on this trip.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

SMH....

"Fueling off duty", skipping logging inspections as on duty to save time on a clock, "my company is okay with this".

ALL COMPLETELY WRONG AND ILLEGAL. Be sure to save your posts though. Your defense attorney will need these for the court after you bump a minivan and they file a lawsuit. If you cut one corner or take one shortcut, you will find it easier each successive time thereafter.

This was a helpful exercise on how not to do things. YOU should review the HOS rules and regulations Bruce.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Remember Bruce, you're on a public forum dedicated to teaching and advising new drivers. Thousands of people see these posts. You'd be smart to be careful what you say and show. These cats around here don't miss much.

I like the fact that you brought up this brain teaser. But something as simple as showing that log screen derailed the whole shebang.

Saying your company allows you to fuel off duty and is ok with your log violations, though doubtful on its own merit, doesn't change the fact that it's still illegal.

Now before anybody gets their Fruit of the Looms in a twist

That's a little insulting considering you were the one who put the info out there to begin with, and were called out on it. Just own it.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I agree… keep it real Bruce.

Remember Bruce, you're on a public forum dedicated to teaching and advising new drivers. Thousands of people see these posts. You'd be smart to be careful what you say and show. These cats around here don't miss much.

I like the fact that you brought up this brain teaser. But something as simple as showing that log screen derailed the whole shebang.

Saying your company allows you to fuel off duty and is ok with your log violations, though doubtful on its own merit, doesn't change the fact that it's still illegal.

double-quotes-start.png

Now before anybody gets their Fruit of the Looms in a twist

double-quotes-end.png

That's a little insulting considering you were the one who put the info out there to begin with, and were called out on it. Just own it.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

Just to make Packrat's and Turtle's comments crystal clear, you as the driver are responsible to comply with the HOS regulations. Whatever your company tells you is okay is irrelevant.

Based on the inspections that I've had, in my opinion, the LEO that did the inspection essentially was evaluating me as a driver. As if they are asking themselves question "do I want this driver on the road." If you get cited for an HOS violation because you didn't log on duty for fueling and you tell the LEO that your company said it was okay, you just answered LEO's question for him. Now he's going to find a reason to shut you down.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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