Preventable Accident.

Topic 32425 | Page 1

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Larry T.'s Comment
member avatar

Had 12 months with 0 incidents in my rookie year and of course ending my 13th month I get a preventable accident. It was in a DG parking lot. Watching the store, parked car to my left and right, forgot there was a boulder protruding slightly beyond the curb. I made the stupid decision to jump the curb and tore off my front bumper. Some cosmetic damage on passenger rim and 2 lugs.

I get so angry with myself since I set up bad and turned it into a tight 90, when I could have simply pulled forward and hugged the building on my sight side while backing up.

Is this considered minor? Pretty depressed about it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

As with everything, it depends. You do have a few things going for you.

You have proven to be a previously safe driver.

IF you reported it before moving the truck.

AND

If you have a decent relationship with your dispatch.

You may get called in for a safety meeting, and get a slap on the wrist. If this happens, of course own your mistake and make sure to emphasize how you plan on correcting your habits so it doesn't happen again.

We have all done stupid đź’©. Many of us are still with the company that we were at when it happened.

Good luck.

Had 12 months with 0 incidents in my rookie year and of course ending my 13th month I get a preventable accident. It was in a DG parking lot. Watching the store, parked car to my left and right, forgot there was a boulder protruding slightly beyond the curb. I made the stupid decision to jump the curb and tore off my front bumper. Some cosmetic damage on passenger rim and 2 lugs.

I get so angry with myself since I set up bad and turned it into a tight 90, when I could have simply pulled forward and hugged the building on my sight side while backing up.

Is this considered minor? Pretty depressed about it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Had 12 months with 0 incidents in my rookie year and of course ending my 13th month I get a preventable accident. It was in a DG parking lot. Watching the store, parked car to my left and right, forgot there was a boulder protruding slightly beyond the curb. I made the stupid decision to jump the curb and tore off my front bumper. Some cosmetic damage on passenger rim and 2 lugs.

I get so angry with myself since I set up bad and turned it into a tight 90, when I could have simply pulled forward and hugged the building on my sight side while backing up.

Is this considered minor? Pretty depressed about it.

Larry, Larry, Larry.

I'm sorry if I sound like I'm admonishing you, but ... On behalf of TT, you were warned!

Remember when you asked Papa Pig, to stay on the DG, when he decided to move on from Werner? It's when shx happens....or soon after. You get to where you feel some pride, I mean... a year is huge!! .. and whoosh; you breach your comfort zone. . . with the "I got this" persona ..

Here's the thread: Werner's 1 year, DG Review...

As I've gleaned from 20 years in and around the industry, Schneider does, in fact .. appear to be more strict than some. Admit your faults, your shortcomings, and agree to watch some videos . . . and ask for a different dedicated route , or tell them you are sorry, eat crow, go another year accident/incident free, and THEN ask for a raise!

All I've got, Larry. But yet once and again, Papa Ray (Pig) was with Werner; two different approaches, perhaps. His contact info is in his profile.

Wish you well, sorry . . as well.

~ Anne & Tom ~

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Larry T.'s Comment
member avatar

I know. Guy's hit the building, dumpster fence, light posts, and cars. I hit a fricken boulder. It's just crazy.

I'm not too worried about this accident. My concern is what happens with next store or roadway accident? I could take a drop and hook job and skid into someone on ice in the coming months. It just feels like I used my only get out of jail free card and I'm axed with any future accident. I guess It will make me be extra caution with store backs however with winter coming I don't see any easy job with a semi.

double-quotes-start.png

Had 12 months with 0 incidents in my rookie year and of course ending my 13th month I get a preventable accident. It was in a DG parking lot. Watching the store, parked car to my left and right, forgot there was a boulder protruding slightly beyond the curb. I made the stupid decision to jump the curb and tore off my front bumper. Some cosmetic damage on passenger rim and 2 lugs.

I get so angry with myself since I set up bad and turned it into a tight 90, when I could have simply pulled forward and hugged the building on my sight side while backing up.

Is this considered minor? Pretty depressed about it.

double-quotes-end.png

Larry, Larry, Larry.

I'm sorry if I sound like I'm admonishing you, but ... On behalf of TT, you were warned!

Remember when you asked Papa Pig, to stay on the DG, when he decided to move on from Werner? It's when shx happens....or soon after. You get to where you feel some pride, I mean... a year is huge!! .. and whoosh; you breach your comfort zone. . . with the "I got this" persona ..

Here's the thread: Werner's 1 year, DG Review...

As I've gleaned from 20 years in and around the industry, Schneider does, in fact .. appear to be more strict than some. Admit your faults, your shortcomings, and agree to watch some videos . . . and ask for a different dedicated route , or tell them you are sorry, eat crow, go another year accident/incident free, and THEN ask for a raise!

All I've got, Larry. But yet once and again, Papa Ray (Pig) was with Werner; two different approaches, perhaps. His contact info is in his profile.

Wish you well, sorry . . as well.

~ Anne & Tom ~

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

You survived the first year without any collisions, so no reason you cannot match this again over the next year. Learn from what happened and continue to improve.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

A year is a Long time to go on that account. If Schneider is anything like Werner you will be fine. Safety asks the dispatchers what kind of driver you are. That is always considered. It’s a blow to your pride . Learn from it and move on bro. You are doing a good job. A driver once told me (driving in general not just dg) that it’s not really a matter of if you mess something up but when and how bad. Lol Get back on the horse cowboy

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

It is considered a minor incident. I will just 2nd what others have said that it's something from which to learn and you will be fine. Don't beat yourself up over it, but still be humble enough to learn from it. The positive aspect is that there is no ticket to go along with the incident. Those Dollar accounts are hell. I envy you none.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BK's Comment
member avatar

This really brings back memories from my time with Schneider. I didn’t damage the front bumper extender that is so low to the ground, but I was told by another driver that it was so common Schneider just considered it as “collateral damage”. I doubt that because Schneider would take away the quarterly bonus whenever they could. But that’s a totally different story.

You may lose the quarterly bonus with Schneider and lose a day of pay to go in for “retraining” at one of their OC locations and spend some time with one of the tan shirt people. Not so bad, I actually made friends with one of those people. Why did I have to go in to see a tan shirt? I’d rather not talk about it, it brings back bad memories. Lol.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Larry you are getting fired the next accident this is minor.

Many companies have a 3 strikes rule within a certain time frame. 3 strikes over 5 years is different from 3 strikes in 2 months.

You are doing great. Take a deep breath. And get rolling! Safely.

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