Shredded Tire Protocol

Topic 32764 | Page 1

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BK's Comment
member avatar

Today I came up on tire debris on the highway. I was able to avoid running it over, but I knew someone up ahead had blown a tire. After a few miles I saw it was from an ABF truck (day cab pulling double pups). The blown tire was from the rear trailer, curb side, outside tire. I saw that about 1/2 of the tire was still on the rim, so I got over into the left lane in order to avoid the remainder of the tire when it came off the wheel.

The driver was doing about 65 so I thought he might not know he had lost a tire. I got up next to him and gave him a T hand signal and he signaled back that he knew about the blown tire. I got past him and then we were approaching an exit for a Love’s. I thought he was going to exit to get a new tire, but he kept on going. Soon after that I lost track of him.

So I wondered about the recommended way to handle this situation, had I been the driver of the ABF truck. Keep in mind that his trailer had only one axle, so one side of his trailer was running on only one tire. Was 65 to fast? Should he have slowed down and had his emergency flashers on? Should he have immediately pulled over to the shoulder? What would have happened if the remaining tire on that side had also blown out as he was driving down the road at 65? How would you LTL drivers handle something like this?

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I would pull over and have it changed if there is a safe spot to do so. Otherwise I'd drive probably around 50 mph to the Loves or somewhere safe.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

There's a few things to consider, first being safety. I want to see if the tire isn't going to shed anymore and that it's not rubbing against the other tire.

Then I consider the weight. If it's empty or really light, I'll consider how far I have to travel. Because this was his rear trailer, it may have been really light or empty.

Assuming the trailer was light or empty, if I have a long distance to travel, I'd stop somewhere safe and wait for road side assistance. All delay pay for me. If I'm not the far from domicile, I'd drive 55-60 until I get back.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Continuing to drive on the blown tire could result in rim.damage also. The tire replacement alone could be around $1000 plus the rim... Big bucks. Continuing could also result in a fire or the shredded tire damaging brake hoses or other components.

Prime wants us to stop immediately as far off the road as possible for safety, and report it.

I know owner ops that would rather get to a parking place then call around for the cheapest tire.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

It could also damage the underside of the trailer and other components.

Continuing to drive on the blown tire could result in rim.damage also. The tire replacement alone could be around $1000 plus the rim... Big bucks. Continuing could also result in a fire or the shredded tire damaging brake hoses or other components.

Prime wants us to stop immediately as far off the road as possible for safety, and report it.

I know owner ops that would rather get to a parking place then call around for the cheapest tire.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Complete agreement with Kearsey.

Continuing to drive on the blown tire could result in rim.damage also. The tire replacement alone could be around $1000 plus the rim... Big bucks. Continuing could also result in a fire or the shredded tire damaging brake hoses or other components.

Prime wants us to stop immediately as far off the road as possible for safety, and report it.

I know owner ops that would rather get to a parking place then call around for the cheapest tire.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

Thinking about it, Kearsey and G-Town are right. A blown tire is instant OOS and the right thing to do is stop as soon as it's safe to do so.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Dan67's Comment
member avatar

A professional would safely stop and get it fixed without causing more damage to equipment or potentially causing an accident.

But I have seen a few line haul drivers just keep going with a careless attitude, just to stay on schedule. They would rather get their shift done and let someone else deal with it.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I've seen both, still going down the asphalt or stopped to await road service.

A few years ago I had a container driver pass by me near Joliet with three of four tires shredded on one side of the chassis trailer. Other drivers were yelling at him on the CB in at least four different languages to no avail. Gave that one a huge following distance to get away from me.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Our protocol is written down, I've had a couple of them. I pulled off as soon as safe to do so and had roadside come repair. The other time was a drive that didn't grenade, it just wouldn't hold air and lost the bead. I drove 2 miles to a shop and had it replaced.

We're to pull off as soon as safely possible but get to the nearest repair facility if we're able to do so without causing further damage and or if we can avoid stopping on the side of the road.

When I say pull off, that means a safe turn out, parking area or facility.

In all cases, I call my DM and breakdown to let them know. I get reimbursed for time and expenses under ancillary pay.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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