What Did You Do Before Becoming A Truck Driver?

Topic 7924 | Page 32

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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I'm bumping this - haven't seen this in a while. Let's hear your story!

Mark P.'s Comment
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I was a civil engineer specialized in post tensioned concrete. Left that after i found one of my inspectors being bribed w/ free lunches. He was passing the wrong grade reinforcing steel for a bridge deck. Corrected the issue and then bowed out.

Then I was a superintendent and project manager to a general contractor building large box retail. Did that for 15 years.

Was bored and went to management for warehousing and only fufilment.

Then I decided to pursue trucking, a dream since I was a kid.

Finished C1, have a fresh CDL A in my hand, and starting US Xpress orientation in the morning!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
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Outstanding, Mark P.!

Joseph L.'s Comment
member avatar

I did casino surveillance for the last fourteen years. The last casino I was with I had maxed out in pay (just under $20 per hour). I was an agent with no ambition to become a supervisor or move into a management position. I had real ambition to stay in surveillance. I stayed on the job because $20 an hour is decent money. I got let go last fall. As I said in another post I was on borrowed time. I had started getting headaches. At first they were typical headaches I took Tylenol or something similar. But the headaches got worse and worse. Then one night it came to head, I started getting sick I couldn't keep my eyes open. The wife took me to the doctor and a few MRI and Cat Scan it was determined that some fluid levels in my brain weren't right. So they put me on medication and warned me I could become addicted to it. I took it twice and toss it, it tasted like chalk and vinger. After a while I was getting by with Tylenol, Advil, Aspirin and peto bismol. The wife had me go see yet another doctor (the 4th) I took all the prescribed medication I had been given. He asked me what I did for a career and I said I am a casino surveillance agent. He took all my prescription medication and dropped it in the trash and told me none of it would help. He said only one thing would, find a new job. He explained that the human eyes weren't built to do surveillance at least not long term. He explained that he had dealt with other surveillance people and most of them had developed problems after about ten years. As surveillance agent your watching multiple screens in my case 80 screens ranging from four inches up to 48 inches each one flashing thousands of colors , some changing every 3.3 second, our eyes aren't desing for it So when I was let go my former boss told me to move on to something else. My wife suggested truck driving. So now that's what I am going after. Hopefully in about six weeks I will be leaving for school

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Key City's Comment
member avatar

I am still in CDL school so I am not a trucker yet. I have always been a line cook for a living. The low pay and never being able to get ahead in life brought me to going to a private school to get my CDL. I worked at an ACE Hardware as a delivery guy / lumber yard worker for a few years. I would unload flatbeds with a forklift and do delivers with a F250 and an 18 foot enclosed trailer. Eventually they bought a F-450 landscaping truck so I could start dumping lumber. There was another guy who drove a straight truck that dumped lumber. They wanted me to obtain my class B to drive that vehicle but didn’t want to give me a raise so I just never did it. Kind of regret that now but I was younger and didn’t think the way I think now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Don's Comment
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I, also am not a driver but hope to be one soon. I have been a nurse for 33+ years.

Jeremy C.'s Comment
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I've done all sorts of things in my 40+ short years, but the most of it (and the most recent) has been IT focused. I was introduced to my first computer back in the late 80's and just haven't been able to get away from the damn things ever since. When I wasn't focused on makiing sales online, I've dabbled in everything from web server administration to coding to InfoSec (information security.) I've designed, set-up, and admin'd various websites from ecommerce to gaming sites. I've learned how to break into and how to protect almost anything that runs on AC or battery power. I'm also a (General Class) ham radio operator. My wife and I are avid campers and hikers (our honeymoon was a tent on the side of a mountain!) And we do a lot of voulnteer work.

Overall, I guess my background is 100% geek! rofl-3.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
TommyGun's Comment
member avatar

Before this?

I was a meter reader for a water utility company for 3 months, and was fired because the guy who left wanted his job back.

Before that I was a range officer for a shooting range. Was very good. Best pistol shot out of all the officers. So much so, I was starting to draw smiley faces on sillouettes and splitting playing cards with a 1911. I'd even offer my time for free to help local law enforcement become better shooters.

They wanted me to stay as a range pro, but I heard from a friend how great an oppurtunity working in utilities was; so I left.

Before that I was a pawn broker for seven years; hated it.

Before that I was a paramedic working in Miami for three years.

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
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After high school left for Navy within 2 days and spent 2 years as engineman. Then after discharge I was an auto mechanic and part time local driver at night until old enough to cross state lines. Then a 44 year career OTR in this great nation. Retired and now full timing in a 5th wheel with my wife.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

KRIS-T's Comment
member avatar

Hi... while at work i came across yall's Forum. This discussion caught my eye so I became a member and joined about 0330 (east coast time) this morning Woooo!

I am not a Truck Driver YET..... however trucking is definitely not new to me. My Dad, after 40+ years of on the road as an owner of a Big RIg is now retired. As a child I would go every summer with him and travel across the US and loved every second of it!!! Fast forward to now.....who would have known 30 years later I would meet a wonderful man that is a truck driver and travel with him on the road, when I can get off work. Key word "when I can get off work" lol

Long story short...after being with him on several runs out west and back I got the same exciting feelings as I did when I was young; now 43... "I want to be a Truck Driver" I love the adventure, the scenary, the many different people you meet and constantly on the go.

So now I am considering hanging up my 911 Supervisor/Law enforcement hat after 15 years and Team up with my best friend who has been in trucking 26 years. No more having to use vacation time or get approval for time off to spend time together... we will just team and make money doing it lol!! I am looking forward to him being my mentor and trainer! Its amazing how life comes back around and gives you another opportunity to fulfill your dream.

I am planning on attending CDL school in 2 months and do what I should have done after I graduated college (degree in Criminal Justice)...Be a female trucker!!

....looking forward to learning alot from you guys and gals!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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