A Strong Case For Much Better Needed Trucker Security And The Laxing Of Gun Laws Nationwide.

Topic 23650 | Page 2

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Keith A.'s Comment
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I love this guy, so much free entertainment!!!!

Have yet to feel afraid at any truck stop or rest area. Although did raise an eyebrow pulling into a pilot in Birmingham for a 34 and there was armed security roaming around. My biggest fear in truckstops is getting run over by other truckers.

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They teach the newbie to give the bad the guy the money and not even resist.

Specifically quoting your last line there... that's what we're pretty much told to do as well, if we get in that situation. A company can put us in a new truck, pay for damages, lost cargo, etc. If I (or any driver) die because we're playing the hero they can't replace us.

Also, you have to figure the number averages of everything you hear. These bad events that happen are still not /that/ common. You'll hear a local news source repeating the same story with one minor update three or four times in a day or two. [shrugs] I figure as long as I keep moving, don't **** anyone off, and don't act like I've got something to hide I can minimize my risk of being a target. And I believe Rainy has made an article (or at least comments) on this very subject.

Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
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At 52 years old, I was born and grew up on Long Island, NY. I have a cousin who was kidnapped as a child, an aunt who while out to dinner was robbed at gun point by armed robbers robbing the restaurant. The robbers pistol whipped an off duty cop with his own gun. I have had more bodily harm done to me while at work. As a welder, I was burned every day. I worked my butt off every day and had aches and pains every night. Those pains are gone driving this truck. In my life I have walked all over Manhattan and never had a problem. I have walked in the South Bronx without a problem. I have walked through some very dangerous neighborhoods with no problems. I am very self aware and have never felt in danger out here. I'm sure I could find trouble if I wanted it. Being armed does not guarantee one's safety.

There is so much about this career/lifestyle that can only be learned by doing it.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
My purpose is not to entertain but inform. I got this story of the web. I'm just a messenger passing it on. I Felt it was important just enough to make thread about. Raise awareness. Newbies who take up driving may have never given security a single thought.

Todd, we are trying hard to bear with you, but think about what you're saying. You are a non trucker, admittedly not even trying to become a trucker, and you seem to think we need to be informed by the random internet info that you find amusing.

We had another guy like you in here several years ago. He was constantly bringing up these random conversations with us. It turned out he was on disability, hadn't hardly been out of the house for years, and I guess he was so lonely that he enjoyed trying to get a conversation going with us.

You amuse us when you say things like this...

Newbies who take up driving may have never given security a single thought.

We've discussed security, guns, and situational awareness so many times in here it's almost overwhelming. Almost every wannabe trucker who comes in here will raise a few questions about it. We've been hashing and rehashing this subject for years. Very few of us are willing to risk our job by ignoring company policy, and most of our customers have signs banning weapons on their property.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rainy D.'s Comment
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Todd...please stop trying to inform us experienced drivers with things you find on the web. I found on the web that Adam and Eve were aliens and their son Cain had a tail and horns, hence the devil story. it doesnt make it true. the internet like most "news stories" are all about sensationalism.

As a woman...i concur i have only felt unsafe at the same birmingham pilot mentioned above and one customer. guess what? it is now in my file i will never return to either place.

Be aware of your surroundings. i have a hammer in my bunk and a large flash light i carry to hit somone in the head with. that light can be thrown through a windshield to grab attention. i wear the bright yellow shirts so if in the dark i am thrown to the ground i can be seen at a distance. some people use their seatbelts and tie them to the door handle....no one can get in.

it terrifies me much more that people like you put soooo much energy into the myths and legends of trucking than the nitty gritty learning process. learn the manual to get the permit. pass the exam to get the CDL. learn time management trip planning and safety. THAT is what is important.

what if some idiot drops his gun out of his pocket and shoots me while im sleeping???

BTW....using a slow ass 75 foot lomg vehicle as a getaway car is ridiculous. No speed and no hiding it. Not to mention the fact that most new CDL hit something, a non CDL holder using my truck as a get away will take out various vehicles in the lot before reaching the street.

THINK. smdh

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

AND... i was a US postal worker for 18 years. I dealt with bombs, anthrax, ecoli, hand grenades, and even alligators in the mail.

i dealt with so many people trying to shoot up the building that i wrote a book about all of the crazy events.

so dont tell me im in greater danger now. the danger in trucking is the idiot cars around us and the super truckers who thought they knew best and never listened during the defensive driving classes.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

it terrifies me much more that people like you put soooo much energy into the myths and legends of trucking than the nitty gritty learning process. learn the manual to get the permit. pass the exam to get the CDL. learn time management trip planning and safety. THAT is what is important.

Yes. Stop wasting so much time worrying about how to haul heavy equipment, security, and all the other crap, and study, pass the permit test, and go to school or a company school. Pee or get off the pot, as they say. Everything else is just a waste of time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brian's Comment
member avatar

I don't know if you just enjoy the attention or what Todd. But first thing the story doesn't make sense to me. I believe there is more too it than being reported. After i looked into it further both the casino and truck stop are Native American owned an operated. The truck stop was a franchised route 66 with only 10 stops. There was a security camera that got footage of the attacker but was deemed inclusive. There was also a security guard there but didn't witness the incident. The driver said the doors were locked on his 2000 Freightliner Century. Now the rest of the story is what I don't get. So this man was able to rip the door open, jump in with rocks, demand money and than after the driver said he had none he starts crushing him in the head with rocks. Doesn't sound like an innocent bystander deal, sounds like he probably had a confrontation with the guy at some point.

I also disagree with your view on gun laws. There exactly what they should be. I'd argue a good amount of conceal carry holders shouldn't be carrying in public to begin with. You have people who have never touched a gun before in their life and now suddenly they take a 16 hour "training" class shoot on the range which is a joke anyway and now there good to go? Letting truck drivers carry would be a huge liability and you would have drivers with Remington shotguns and rifles under their bunks ready for war. The very FIRST conceal carry holder in Illinois to receive his license was also the first to have it revoked. Long story short his neighbor had stuff in his yard, he asked him to get rid of it. Neighbor said he would later guy pulled his gun out.

Lastly, your argument about no other occupation at danger. My grandfather was a pipefitter in Chicago and was robbed twice over his 40 year career and almost carjacked.

Like everyone here is saying. Common sense goes a long way.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Brian's Comment
member avatar

Meant the route 66 only had 10 spots.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

This thread reminds me alot of that show a few years ago "big rig bounty hunters". That show sure made it seem like a very big problem of trucks/cargo being stolen and the drivers being assaulted. Does it happen? Of course but the likelihood of being a victim is much lower than the internet or tv would lead you to believe. These stories we read are so few and far between when the driver is "randomly" targeted yet theres how many millions of drivers out there who never have any trouble on the road.

Todd, please answer me this. in this instance of the driver waking up with someone already in the cab, how would a firearm have saved him? I have no strong opinion on guns however wouldnt it be easy to wrestle it away from someone who just Woke up? Also, isnt part of being a responsible gun owner keeping the gun and ammo in different places? Reminds me of comedian Jim Jeffries gun control bit "You wait here D-head, i need my bullets."

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

My whole feeling is if they want my truck they can have it, it is big slow and has 3 GPSs on it, they are not going to get very far plus the company can easily afford replacements.

All I would ask is that they leave me my drivers license and DOT card so I do not have to go to the DMV and deal with that hassle.

In my limited 2 months OTR I saw one fight at a Pilot 2 drivers where in a shooting match over something what I'm not sure. They almost came to blows before other drivers separated them. Had one or both been armed who knows what could have happneded.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

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