Prime PSD Training, From A Trainer's Perspective.

Topic 25397 | Page 26

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Turtle's Comment
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Obviously your student recognized me as Spaceman Spiff right?

If he did, he didn't mention it.rofl-1.gif

He kind of gave me the impression that he only visited TT when he was researching truck driving as a possible career. He never officially joined, and didn't participate. But he could still be here right now, lurking behind the scenes lol

Turtle's Comment
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I don't remember if I mentioned it before, but this student came to Prime wanting to be a flatbedder. He obviously did some research, because he cited all the same reasons why most of us flatbedders enjoy the division. Things like working outdoors, physical exercise, a fairly regular schedule, and variety of job sites were all important reasons why I chose it in particular.

There was however one thing he hadn't considered, and it hit him square in the face on our very first load...

We picked up wood molding, bundled and stacked to max height on the deck. The forklift driver lifted my tarps up to the top for me, and after strapping the load I started climbing up to the top to unroll them. I'm pretty sure I heard my student's jaw hit the floor at that moment.

"You have to climb up on the loads?"

"Yeah sometimes, but not often."

"Oh man, I didn't think we'd ever have to get up off the deck. I'm pretty afraid of heights."

shocked.png

I had to stop right there and explain to him that, although most of the loads will be relatively safe, there will be times when you're required to climb up there. If a fear of heights is an issue, he needs to really reconsider his options at this point. Fear, imbalance, and heights don't mix. If you can't put the fear away, you'll become more dangerous to yourself.

Fast forward to our next load, 16 pallets of shingles. Each pallet is only 3-4 ft high, but he still displayed a fear of even getting up that high.

So just like that, he's figured that maybe flatbedding isn't for him. At least he found out now in the very early stages of training, versus later on when he's more invested into it. There's no shame whatsoever in that, I told him. We have two other divisions that may be better suited for him. No sweat.

Beyond that, the regular CDL training has been going ok. Memorization of the pretrip has been a struggle, but it's coming around now. He drives fine, and although we haven't had a lot of backing practice, he showed small signs of an intuitive feel for when to turn the wheel. I hope to nurture that over the weekend since we likely be parked near the receiver by Saturday pm for a Monday morning delivery.

Rob D, we delivered in O'Fallon yesterday, and parked at the Loves on 370 for the afternoon/evening. I thought about hitting you up, but really had to devote those hours to drilling the pre trip further into my student. Time well spent, and needed. Maybe next time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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So just like that, he's figured that maybe flatbedding isn't for him

Back in the day I was terrified of heights. I started a tree service and I had to do the climbing. It took me a few months of grinding it out and willing myself to go higher, but soon enough I completely conquered that fear and learned to enjoy the view from up high. Now, of course, I climb mountains for fun. It's common for me to be on a vertical cliff hundreds, or even thousands of feet above the valley floor with nothing underneath my feet and I absolutely love it. There's not an ounce of fear whatsoever.

I think a lot of people believe that a fear of heights is something you have to live with. It's not. The fear of heights can be rather easily overcome. Just make sure he realizes that. It isn't something that has to hold him back.

Rick S.'s Comment
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Back in the day I was terrified of heights. I started a tree service and I had to do the climbing. It took me a few months of grinding it out and willing myself to go higher, but soon enough I completely conquered that fear and learned to enjoy the view from up high. Now, of course, I climb mountains for fun. It's common for me to be on a vertical cliff hundreds, or even thousands of feet above the valley floor with nothing underneath my feet and I absolutely love it. There's not an ounce of fear whatsoever.

I think a lot of people believe that a fear of heights is something you have to live with. It's not. Your height and your heritage are two things you have to live with, but fear of heights can be rather easily overcome. Just make sure he realizes that. It isn't something that has to hold him back.

Not about heights AT ALL myself.

Back in my Navy days (as an Electronics Tech), I had to go up the main mast to check antenna connectors and insulators. Went up the mast in the safety harness, then they told me I had to throw a line around the yardarm and pull myself out to the end to check the antennas. I climbed down and told them they could WRITE ME UP and Article 19 me, because that was NOT GOING TO HAPPEN - EVER.

One of the reasons I just wouldn't consider FB for myself, and have the greatest admiration for those that do. Another "height sensitive" segment is CAR HAULERS. One slip, and you're on the deck from up high. Works for some, not for others.

Roller coasters and amusement park rides are fine. Hauling myself up to heights - NOT...

Rick

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Well I think almost everyone is naturally afraid of heights to begin with. I just want people to know that it's not something that's hardwired into us. You can learn to adapt to it and overcome the fear. It will dissipate with time. Your mind will adapt to it.

It's kind of like adapting to exercise. No one is born a distance runner. It's something you have to work at steadily over time so your body can slowly adapt to it.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Rob D.'s Comment
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Rob D, we delivered in O'Fallon yesterday, and parked at the Loves on 370 for the afternoon/evening.

Turtle thanks for thinking of me.

on the subject of heights, I am not a fan, but understand it will be part of the job.

As far as researching flatbedding I have learned so much from this website and forum. Brett and the mods here are so knowledgeable, helpful, brutally honest, and patient with wannabes like me. I am still on track with my plan ( Rainy knows the details) to start Prime next spring.

still hope to persuade Turtle to go TNT with me.

anyone who rolls through st. Louis ping me on here

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

Hey Turtle we were actually at the Flying J in Lake Station at the same time back when you were with your first student. It was about 430 in the morning. Anyways I stop in there a couple times a week but pass by everyday. If you ever have time I'll happily stop in there.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Sigh... obscure anonymity fades with the ever increasing popularity of TT.

double-quotes-end.png

I know exactly what you mean! Being a famous celebrity kinda sucks. At least for me it does. Every time I try to go out, or doing something normal like I used to do, that’s when the chaos begins. Groupies, autograph seekers, the paparazzi, stalkers....It’s just endless. I long for my life before all this began. rofl-1.gifrofl-1.gif

Mr. PackRat, Sir, can I get your digital autograph for my collection?

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

No. Turtle’s thread, not mine.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar
So just like that, he's figured that maybe flatbedding isn't for him.

Is he still hanging in there with you or did he jump ship?

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