Is 50 Too Old To Start With Pro-driver Career?

Topic 25530 | Page 3

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Army 's Comment
member avatar

The diabetes might be a problem if you need insulin. Most companies won't hire you if you need injections due to the fact most trucks don't come installed with a refrigerator to keep the insulin cool.

Umm, I think most truckers have refrigerators.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

The diabetes might be a problem if you need insulin. Most companies won't hire you if you need injections due to the fact most trucks don't come installed with a refrigerator to keep the insulin cool.

Sorry Jeff... but I COMPLETELY DISAGREE!

1. It has never even been a conversation with any trucking company! As long as I have the MCSA-5870 from I can get a 1-year unrestricted (except for eyeglasses!) Federal Medical Certificate. That is all they seem to care about.

2. While insulin is best stored long-term refrigerated, it is not required. While 3-days is the timeframe recommended to change infusion sets (the point of contact between the pump and the body) I wait until I have gone through 300ml and emptied the reservoir in the pump. For me, now, this is typically 4-5 days. During this time the insulin is at ambient temperature or higher as I typically sleep "warm" - often with a heated mattress pad or blanket. The insulin does not lose its effectiveness under such circumstances.

3. I have a 12-volt electronic cooler, to which I have added additional insulation. A freezer block or ice would extend cold time considerably. Ice can easily be replenished. A "5-day" cooler will keep ice in 90 degree heat and sun for 5 days... a typical "Regional Run".

4. While many companies do not provide refrigerators, many cabs are "fridge ready". Inverters and APUs add flexibility and functionality.

5. I suspect many companies could and some would try to accommodate the driver by providing a cab with a fridge or one which will accept and power one. Just a conversation to have...

6. Planned gig I hope to resume training for is a 7-State Regional position where I will be out 5 or 6 nights and back home. While I will carry enough insulin and pump supplies to stay out longer if necessary / desired / appropriate that is not really too long to manage. As long as it is not left sitting in the heat of a closed up vehicle baking in the sun, I would not be that concerned.

Worst case scenario I can probably leave a vial or two "unclaimed" and get it transferred and picked up at a Walmart anywhere on the road.

Think solutions not problems!

smile.gif

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

"I think most truckers have refrigerators."

Only the new tractors have fridges. My trainer, a 26 year vet with 3 million miles, had a 2016 with no inverter or fridge. I think Schneider is putting fridges in new trucks to compete for new drivers because other companies are offering them. Met up with a young company driver who was driving a brand new International with a fridge and APU. I asked him how long he'd been driving. He told me that he was on his first load. How they decide who gets the new units, I have no idea.

confused.gif

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

The diabetes might be a problem if you need insulin. Most companies won't hire you if you need injections due to the fact most trucks don't come installed with a refrigerator to keep the insulin cool.

Two separate topics on here and you’re spouting out bad information on both, after joining us less than an hour ago. Where are you coming up with this information? This is Trucking Truth, not “I make up stuff”, or “I type what I saw on YouTube”.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Jeff

Can you give some details about your headaches running drivers?

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

"I think most truckers have refrigerators."

Only the new tractors have fridges. My trainer, a 26 year vet with 3 million miles, had a 2016 with no inverter or fridge. I think Schneider is putting fridges in new trucks to compete for new drivers because other companies are offering them. Met up with a young company driver who was driving a brand new International with a fridge and APU. I asked him how long he'd been driving. He told me that he was on his first load. How they decide who gets the new units, I have no idea.

confused.gif

My apologies, I meant the ability to have a fridge. Thanks for the correction

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Yuriy K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you everyone for your replies.

I have obtained my DOT card for 1 year from a local "driver friendly" physician. This Friday I am taking my first 3 tests for CLP - general knowledge, air brakes and combination vehicles. Monday have Hazmat endorsement exam scheduled with local DMW.

Meanwhile, I also talked to SWIFT. They have a very friendly recruiter who educated me on their options. Their pay rate for solo dry van rookie is $.37/mi, which seems to be slightly lower; however, their base is in Columbus, which is only 2 hrs drive time from my house.

I would appreciate your advice or any info you guys can help me with on SWIFT.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Yuriy K.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, here is another update:

Got my CLP (Permit) and coming Monday, June 3rd, starting with SWIFT Academy training in Columbus, OH. Hopefully, their school is using manual transmission trucks. I really would like to learn to operate manual.

I decided to pay their tuition myself, to keep my options open. This should give me a freedom to leave without debt hanging over my shoulder, just in case it doesn't work out after a fair try - let's say 6 months or so.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Nolaman's Comment
member avatar

I started driving at 56, and I LOVE it! I'm going to be 60 this September. I have a lot of good years left in me. No, you're not too old.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Yuriy K

I'm 65 when I went back to driving again. I also have sleep apnea. I use my machine every night in my truck . Make sure that you tell them this so they can make sure that in your TNT portion of training that your trainer has either an inverter or an APU to run your machine. No power no machine.

Good luck

Raptor

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More