Does Roehl Charge Tuition If You Fail Your CDL Exam?

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Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

I don't want to get into a ****ing contest Bobcat. You win.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Not trying to win anything, but saying 99% of people who try local out of school will fail is ludicrous. It is certainly a much harder way into trucking but I know of several drivers at my terminal alone who came fresh out of school.

Some people who come here can not or do not want to do OTR and might end up missing out on a good career based on some of the posts here.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

I think it’s pretty accurate. If your a rookie 99% of you will fail at city driving in Pittsburgh. But by all means don’t let this troll scare you.

Not trying to win anything, but saying 99% of people who try local out of school will fail is ludicrous. It is certainly a much harder way into trucking but I know of several drivers at my terminal alone who came fresh out of school.

Some people who come here can not or do not want to do OTR and might end up missing out on a good career based on some of the posts here.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Craig L.'s Comment
member avatar

Not trying to win anything, but saying 99% of people who try local out of school will fail is ludicrous. It is certainly a much harder way into trucking but I know of several drivers at my terminal alone who came fresh out of school.

Some people who come here can not or do not want to do OTR and might end up missing out on a good career based on some of the posts here.

I am tending to lean towards this opinion. If you fail you fail, but it is up to you and what you choose to make out of it just like any job/career. You don't know if you don't try and also if you do fail or simply don't like it at least you didn't waste too much time in the process so then move on to the next path or go back with what you know.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

It’s suicide for a trucking career. If you do want to go local you don’t want to screw it up going head first into the deep end. A few fender benders on the city streets will ensure that your first and last job will be your so precious dream local job. I know people can do it and I know people who have. None of them could go get a job a shnieder or Werner now though. They done screwed that up with all their fender benders. Now they are stuck driving a city route in Pittsburgh for the rest of their natural life. Hand bombing freight from one tiny little grocery store to the next and many little gas stations. For two your going to find out on your city route that driving needs to come second nature because your real job is as a laborer unloading your truck. Then you will find out that a 16 hour work day not counting the ride to and from is the worst possible life you could of ever asked for. Even if people can handle the driving part the long hours and little time off will have you running for the hills. Nobody comming in to trucking can even imagine the life of a city driver. The total life suck that it can be. You might get home for a few hours everyday but you will spend that time sucking on the end of a revolver trying to work up the courage to pull the trigger.

double-quotes-start.png

Not trying to win anything, but saying 99% of people who try local out of school will fail is ludicrous. It is certainly a much harder way into trucking but I know of several drivers at my terminal alone who came fresh out of school.

Some people who come here can not or do not want to do OTR and might end up missing out on a good career based on some of the posts here.

double-quotes-end.png

I am tending to lean towards this opinion. If you fail you fail, but it is up to you and what you choose to make out of it just like any job/career. You don't know if you don't try and also if you do fail or simply don't like it at least you didn't waste too much time in the process so then move on to the next path or go back with what you know.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

Not trying to win anything, but saying 99% of people who try local out of school will fail is ludicrous. It is certainly a much harder way into trucking but I know of several drivers at my terminal alone who came fresh out of school.

Some people who come here can not or do not want to do OTR and might end up missing out on a good career based on some of the posts here.

I think we've hired about 15 or 20 guys over the past 4 years to go through our driver program.

Of those I can think of TWO that have been let go due to accidents. Others have gone to the Road and the rest of us are still slogging away in the City.

And I don't think FedEx requires any form of reimbursement should you flunk out. If you pass, you pay back your education within the first year.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

It’s suicide for a trucking career. If you do want to go local you don’t want to screw it up going head first into the deep end. A few fender benders on the city streets will ensure that your first and last job will be your so precious dream local job. I know people can do it and I know people who have. None of them could go get a job a shnieder or Werner now though. They done screwed that up with all their fender benders. Now they are stuck driving a city route in Pittsburgh for the rest of their natural life. Hand bombing freight from one tiny little grocery store to the next and many little gas stations. For two your going to find out on your city route that driving needs to come second nature because your real job is as a laborer unloading your truck. Then you will find out that a 16 hour work day not counting the ride to and from is the worst possible life you could of ever asked for. Even if people can handle the driving part the long hours and little time off will have you running for the hills. Nobody comming in to trucking can even imagine the life of a city driver. The total life suck that it can be. You might get home for a few hours everyday but you will spend that time sucking on the end of a revolver trying to work up the courage to pull the trigger.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Not trying to win anything, but saying 99% of people who try local out of school will fail is ludicrous. It is certainly a much harder way into trucking but I know of several drivers at my terminal alone who came fresh out of school.

Some people who come here can not or do not want to do OTR and might end up missing out on a good career based on some of the posts here.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I am tending to lean towards this opinion. If you fail you fail, but it is up to you and what you choose to make out of it just like any job/career. You don't know if you don't try and also if you do fail or simply don't like it at least you didn't waste too much time in the process so then move on to the next path or go back with what you know.

double-quotes-end.png

You have no idea just how wrong you are.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Don's Comment
member avatar

CFI's training program at Crowder College was 4 weeks, a great amount of behind the wheel time, room and 3 all you could eat meals daily Monday-Saturday. I was shocked the quality and quantity of food that was served. It cost just over $4000 for this. I don't think CFIcan be beat for a company sponsored program, but I am biased.

As somebody who went through the Roehl training program and am a current driver with them I fully support their program and recommend it to anybody who is willing to work. They charge 7000 because once you’re there they pay for your hotel, feed you 2 meals a day and train you to get your CDL and you’re there for 3 weeks. It’s a significant cost for them to do that and you need to pay them back and the way you pay them back is working for them for 120000 miles. Nothing is free. I went into it fully expecting it to be challenging and it was. There have been times I’ve wanted to quit and say forget about it but I’ve stayed through and turned some good miles for them. I am up to 52 cpm in my 10th month and almost done with my contract. Half of the people I’ve came in with quit cause they weren’t getting paid like they thought they should have. They must not have researched and known that your first year you’re not going to make a lot of money. I’m glad I found this site cause I realized that going into it. If after 6 months you want to leave just stick it out another 6 months you’ve already come this far. And out of the 15 people I came in with getting their CDL 14 eventually passed. The only one that didn’t pass didn’t belong in the truck to begin with. I highly recommend this program to anybody willing to work.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Rubber duck while I agree local isn't the best option for a recent graduate to get started you're spreading bad information in that post. I got my start unloading a pup trailer in downtown Des Moines and got through my rookie year accident free. Yes Des Moines is much smaller than Pittsburgh but the challenges are similar. If someone has had so many accidents that they can't be hired on elsewhere why has the current company kept them on? Surely Insurance has a say if they'll insure someone. To say that all those guys do is go home and put a gun in their mouth and try to find the courage to pull the trigger? You need help. Not once did that thought ever cross my mind. It's simple, if you don't like the job find one you do. Not every local job is unloading by hand. Yes the food companies pay a pretty penny but you earn every bit of it. I made 85k my first year doing it and I felt it wasnt enough for the work involved so i found something i enjoy more for similar pay that allows me to work only 4 days a week.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

The company keeps them because less than one percent of the worlds population can do their job. Maybe like 1-1000th of a percent of people could do their job. Basically they are the X-men of trucking. Demois come on. My 14 yo daughter could drive a 53 foot van around there. I take it all back. If you work in a city built after the industrial revolution you will do just fine.

Rubber duck while I agree local isn't the best option for a recent graduate to get started you're spreading bad information in that post. I got my start unloading a pup trailer in downtown Des Moines and got through my rookie year accident free. Yes Des Moines is much smaller than Pittsburgh but the challenges are similar. If someone has had so many accidents that they can't be hired on elsewhere why has the current company kept them on? Surely Insurance has a say if they'll insure someone. To say that all those guys do is go home and put a gun in their mouth and try to find the courage to pull the trigger? You need help. Not once did that thought ever cross my mind. It's simple, if you don't like the job find one you do. Not every local job is unloading by hand. Yes the food companies pay a pretty penny but you earn every bit of it. I made 85k my first year doing it and I felt it wasnt enough for the work involved so i found something i enjoy more for similar pay that allows me to work only 4 days a week.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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