Does Roehl Charge Tuition If You Fail Your CDL Exam?

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Craig L.'s Comment
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So rainy you're saying going to a school and having the CDL if you dont use it for a couple months could be considered stale? Can companies verify your 160 hour class?

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The longer you wait to drive after getting a CDL from a private school, you decrease your desirability of being hired. An example is if you finished schooling, then didn’t drive for over six months since, your possibilities go down when applying somewhere with zero experience. It all depends on the employer. This is why we advise people that may be on the fence about driving to make the commitment prior to attending a private school or company-sponsored training.

If you complete schooling, they will give you the certificate, as long as all fees have been paid beforehand. It’s like your trucking basic education diploma. The schools keep records of graduates, so verification is simple.

Is there a list of accredited schools?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
. Is there a list of accredited schools?

Your best option would be Company Sponsored Training. Complete the training, pass your skills and road test, you are HIRED.

Paid CDL Training Programs

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Is there a list of accredited schools?

There is no governing body that declares trucking schools as accredited. Now some of them pay a fee to join an organization that will grant them that title, but it means absolutely nothing. You can't get accredited when there's no set guidelines or requirements for what you should teach.

The main thing employers want to see is a certificate stating you had 160 hours of training. You may actually be behind the wheel for only a few hours at most schools, but the training includes classroom time, observation time (watching the others struggle at everything), and actual driving time. The 160 hours is something the insurance underwriters determined would help minimize their exposure to liability.

Hopefully you're beginning to see the value of Paid CDL Training Programs. They are trying to develop you into a productive CDL driving employee. That is your goal also.

The private schools take your money, allow you the bare minimum time behind the wheel to get your CDL, and then they are moving on to someone else who is wanting to pay them. I think I got maybe 4 hours behind the wheel during my 160 hour private truck driving school experience. I paid 3,500 dollars for that, and then struggled like crazy to get hired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Don's Comment
member avatar

Go the company sponsored route, preferably one that teaches you to use a manual transmission during. I am so happy/fortunate that I went to CFI's sponsored program. Their training at Crowder College was excellent, the tuition was low and you also received room and board. The college's cafeteria food was excellent! I left CFI after a couple of months (due to a family health issue) and paid my remaining tuition. Working local now. Unfortunately,from what I have heard, CFI's training has been reduced to 3 weeks and training is done on auto transmissions? BHOOoooo..! If this isn't true, I would highly recommend CFI.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar
Is there a list of accredited schools?

The company you are planning on getting in with - can provide you with a list of schools THEY LIKE.

If you're still planning on going local - this may vary from company to company. As discussed in previous threads, they may like to hire/train from within.

But, for example - if you plan on going to Sheridan VoTech (9 week course), there are companies that hire right out of there upon graduation. No local ones that I know of - as of the last time I talked to my old instructor there.

You need to MAKE UP YOUR MIND which direction you're going in. If you accept that going OTR for a year, will open many more doors for local work - then do a COMPANY TRAINING (though good luck finding one that hires out of our zip code).

Many companies that take "recent grads" (that don't do CDL licensing training in-house), have a couple of schools they work with.

BEWARE CDL MILLS (like Metropolitan), who will give you the BARE MINIMUM to get you your CDL. Sheridan is like $1,900 (+ books), many of the privates are many times more expensive (despite being shorter in duration).

But again - you NEED TO DECIDE WHAT YOUR FUTURE CAREER PLANS ARE. And then take the most effective route to get there.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

Old school said he got 4 hours behind the wheel at a private school. That’s the brutal truth about trucking. Not to many people would admit this but it’s so true. I got about 4 hours also. Your taught the test and that’s it. If they try to teach anymore than that in 4 hours your head would explode and you could never pass the test. These company paid places are spending way more time and money on you than the private 4 week schools that’s for sure. Is it the best way to go. Well opinions are like butt holes. Everyone’s got one. I don’t know if this is an opinion or a fact but I think a rookie comming out of a cdl mill has bout a 1% chance of making it in a local city driving gig. 3 month experience 5% chance. 6 months experience 10% chance. 1 year experience 20% chance. 2 years experience 50% chance. 3 years experience 70% chance. And that’s about where my opinion on the matter will end.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
I don’t know if this is an opinion or a fact but I think a rookie comming out of a cdl mill has bout a 1% chance of making it in a local city driving gig. 3 month experience 5% chance. 6 months experience 10% chance. 1 year experience 20% chance. 2 years experience 50% chance. 3 years experience 70% chance. And that’s about where my opinion on the matter will end

That is a opinion unless you have numbers to back up this claim.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

As somebody who went through the Roehl training program and am a current driver with them I fully support their program and recommend it to anybody who is willing to work. They charge 7000 because once you’re there they pay for your hotel, feed you 2 meals a day and train you to get your CDL and you’re there for 3 weeks. It’s a significant cost for them to do that and you need to pay them back and the way you pay them back is working for them for 120000 miles. Nothing is free. I went into it fully expecting it to be challenging and it was. There have been times I’ve wanted to quit and say forget about it but I’ve stayed through and turned some good miles for them. I am up to 52 cpm in my 10th month and almost done with my contract. Half of the people I’ve came in with quit cause they weren’t getting paid like they thought they should have. They must not have researched and known that your first year you’re not going to make a lot of money. I’m glad I found this site cause I realized that going into it. If after 6 months you want to leave just stick it out another 6 months you’ve already come this far. And out of the 15 people I came in with getting their CDL 14 eventually passed. The only one that didn’t pass didn’t belong in the truck to begin with. I highly recommend this program to anybody willing to work.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

To quote Rubber Duck:

. And that’s about where my opinion on the matter will end.

Bobcat responds:

That is a opinion unless you have numbers to back up this claim.

Bobcat, Which part of Rubber Ducks 11 word sentence did you not understand?

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Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
Bobcat, Which part of Rubber Ducks 11 word sentence did you not understand?

You must have missed this part

I don’t know if this is an opinion or a fact

To say 99% of new drivers fail at local is a bold statement to make and should be backed by facts

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