Pay From Companies?

Topic 25797 | Page 4

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andhe78's Comment
member avatar
Quick question, are you regional or OTR? I'm just curious because Maverick is one of the companies that I'm very interested in. I assume you do flatbed and not glass due to your tarp pay. Do glass drivers make about the same?

I’m otr. Because of my location, they can only get me home every other weekend. However, I like to stay out for a couple months, then take ten or so days home. Lets me get some “quality” time home instead of just a 34. We haul the same freight in the same lanes as the regional guys, just don’t go home as often. There are some benefits to staying out though.

I am flatbed, and the glass guys do make a couple cents more per mile, but the pay really comes down to how you run. Some glass guys can get 3k miles a week and others struggle to get 1800. Same on the flatbed side.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Lou wants to know...

Do glass drivers make about the same?

Good question!

Andhe78 responds with...

I am flatbed, and the glass guys do make a couple cents more per mile, but the pay really comes down to how you run. Some glass guys can get 3k miles a week and others struggle to get 1800. Same on the flatbed side.

A really great answer!

I've been wanting to jump into this discussion, but was waiting for the best timing. I'm so glad Andhe78 answered Lou the way he did. It confirms that he knows what he's doing out here, and understands the way you make money at this. People, especially new entry level drivers, are constantly thinking that the way you make more money is to get the highest CPM rate. Your rate of pay is really a very small part of the formula for making good money at this. Knowing how to operate, being productive, managing your hours well, and communicating well with customers and dispatch can double your income over what other drivers earning the same CPM rate are making.

I've seen this worked out repeatedly on the dedicated account I'm serving. Drivers earning a very similar, if not identical pay rate as me, are getting paid almost half what I'm earning. My dispatcher is very open with me about these things, and sometimes will ask me to mentor or coach another driver that he thinks shows potential. One of those drivers recently thanked me for some advice I gave him. His words were, "I never realized how much more money I could be making by employing the simple strategies you suggested. I honestly think my gross pay for this next year will be twice what it was last year, and I haven't even got a bump in my CPM pay rate. I can't believe how much money I was leaving on the table!"

Being hyper productive is key to real success on this job. Here's a link to a fairly recent conversation on How To Make More Money In Trucking.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Anybody that strives to be an overachiever, constantly seeks to improve, keeps moving forward, sees the glass as half full, has great communication with dispatch, and shows commitment WILL BE A SUCCESS.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Anybody that strives to be an overachiever, constantly seeks to improve, keeps moving forward, sees the glass as half full, has great communication with dispatch, and shows commitment WILL BE A SUCCESS.

Talking about me again Packrat??? I am flattered

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Anybody that strives to be an overachiever, constantly seeks to improve, keeps moving forward, sees the glass as half full, has great communication with dispatch, and shows commitment WILL BE A SUCCESS.

double-quotes-end.png

Talking about me again Packrat??? I am flattered

Well, if it had been specifically with you in mind, I may have added...gives useful advice, willing to help and train others, be a people person, not worried about following a crowd, dressed and groomed for success, likes to try new things, be kind to animals, and stays aware of surroundings when flying (literally) around parking lots.

You’re always on my mind, Princess. Usually out of fear, though.smile.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Solo's Comment
member avatar

Your killing it at TMC . Goona make over 100k this year. Probably the world record at tmc for a company driver. Congrats

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Have been Solo flatbedder for TMC for 4 months now and my lowest take home (after taxes) has been $1339.32 and my largest week (after taxes) has been $2202.49.

I'm staying in the $1500-$1600/wk after taxes range as an avg.

If you take my gross pay and just divide it by ALL miles (not including tarp and bounce pay), it works out to $.55/cpm

If you take my gross pay + tarp pay + bounce pay and divide it by dispatched miles, it jumps up to $.65/cpm

double-quotes-end.png

Last years top rookie made 80k. That won't even be an issue for me at this rate.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Solo wrote:

Last years top rookie made 80k. That won't even be an issue for me at this rate.

A lot can happen in 6 months. Like; rates fall. Careful, you sound puffed-up.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

G-town wrote in response to Solo's claim...

"How about you come clean and provide something substantial in support of your numbers. I don’t mean any disrespect Solo, it’s just that we are about Truth here...and myself and several others are finding it difficult to accept your numbers as fact. If indeed they are, I’ll apologize profusely and trash my calculator."

How about it Solo? Because no doubt you said earnings so far are very impressive. Is there anything you have done in particular to be making these kind of bones? Always had an interest in TMC.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Just 2 weeks ago he said he was grossing $1800 per week, which is before taxes and other withholdings. Compare that to this thread.

$1800 gross is going to net about $1400-1450-ish after taxes (still a really good number for any driver, rookie or veteran). Unless he somehow has a ton of deductions lowering his taxable income, I think my estimate is reasonable.

He gets a percentage of the load rate at TMC. Per Old School, rates are very high right now. Rates fluctuate, what is up now, may come down and quick. This is why it’s important to temper a small sampling of information (4 months) with a healthy reality check.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

What’s your gross year to date revenue solo. I’m jealous

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