Switched To A Local Account

Topic 26117 | Page 3

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Pete E Pothole's Comment
member avatar

So to not try and butt heads with anyone, we have seen cases recently, where some Schnieder drivers were making significantly more or less per mile. With the same experience, perhaps Jamie was one of those guys who signed on at a lower rate, and is making now what he claims. Seems to me since I have been around he's been on the road ALOT, turning miles. I just don't think we have all of the information here to claim he isnt being truthful, or hard working.

Just my .02, have a great and safe day everyone.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

So to not try and butt heads with anyone, we have seen cases recently, where some Schnieder drivers were making significantly more or less per mile. With the same experience, perhaps Jamie was one of those guys who signed on at a lower rate, and is making now what he claims. Seems to me since I have been around he's been on the road ALOT, turning miles. I just don't think we have all of the information here to claim he isnt being truthful, or hard working.

Just my .02, have a great and safe day everyone.

CPM is only part of the equation. Mileage and other forms of pay like stop pay and bonus pay must also be considered. In the end it all comes down to mileage per week, per month and per quarter.

I copied this link; it's from Schneider's website: Schneider Pay

It clearly states $49,000+ is a reasonable expectation for first year pay. We constantly reinforce the concept of first year pay in the range of 40-45k total. This is where the learning curve is absorbed and experienced. That said, I doubt Jamie is doubling his income. Until he has a full year of pay history, no idea how he or anyone else can make a claim like; "I am doubling my pay". He does not have enough data or experience to back his claim, which is why more than 1 forum member is casting doubt on his post.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

This is a good conversation. I'm glad we're having it. As you can see there's a lot of confusion about truck driver pay. I think it all boils down to the fact that most people simply have a hard time adjusting to performance based pay. It's hard to determine what you're actually making as a rookie (like Jamie), when you really don't have any track record but a few struggling months of still trying to figure out what you're doing.

Once again we are discussing a situation that reinforces the things we teach about sticking it out for one full year. At a minimum, it will take that much time to get yourself established. It takes several more years after that to be able to start producing in a meaningful way that produces a good comfortable income. Look at what Jamie said - I think this is what has thrown his calculations off...

I make a set amount of money everyday

That was never the case for him as an OTR driver. It's a comfort level that he's content with. It seems like a lot because he's not accustomed to being paid that way as a driver. It would drive me insane! I want to be turned loose to my own set of standards. I like to write my own rules. Don't put any limits on me - I want to prove my own worth and Run With The Big Dogs. If I have the chance to make a couple of thousand dollars per week, by George I'll shoot for the moon and take my chances. Sometimes I'll git 'er done, sometimes I'll come up a little short, but I will sure give it my best try everyday I'm out here.

It's not something everybody is comfortable with. We see it often. People have trouble adjusting to this lifestyle, and the unique way we earn our keep. I've always taken the approach that says, "Show Me The Money!" Then I go out there and shake that sugar tree until I start to get some results. That takes determination and commitment. An acceptable comfortable steady income is always the enemy of that approach.

I have no problem with Jamie's choice, but I can't see it as doubling his pay. He simply wasn't getting it done OTR the way he needed to make some good money. I think we're all happy for him. He seems quite happy with his new situation. We're just concerned with a few of his statements being a little misleading to other newbies in here.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Old school all of that last post seems spot on i grew up in a logging family which was obviously performance base and my mother sewed government gloves which was piece rate so im guessing it helped my drive and never say no and i cant attitude although i dont wanna do this forever and i have my moments of i should go local so i can see my kids before they are no longer kids i cant help but have that drive to do better for my family too but if a day comes i see a home daily 100k job which im sure eventually will im gonna have to turn in my joggin shoes for sprinter shoes and go for it

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

What I made while I was OTR wasn't important at all, this topic was to simply let everyone know what I've been up to lately you could say. This account offered everything I needed for my specific situation, that I couldn't get while I was OTR. It wasn't just about the money, I simply included that I was making double what I made OTR, rather if that was my own fault or not isn't relevant to this topic. You can make great money at Schneider, as shown by many other Schneider drivers I've talked to. But my situation is different, and I couldn't wait to build up to that point. I needed a stable income now.

Since I like working for Schneider, I didn't want to leave. So I found another spot within the company that would better support my situation. But over all I was on track to drive around 110,000 miles my first year with the rate I was going while I was OTR. \

Without going into my pay details, no I am not making 6 figures in this new job or close to it. I am simply making more then what I made while I was OTR.

But nonetheless, I understand the replies regarding pay and I felt the need to reply that this is regarding my specific situation and not what I could have made while I was OTR.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Oh and thats another part of trucking i love with some solid experience there are soooooo many options out here in trucking pay wise schedule wise job duties wise theres just a ton

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I simply included that I was making double what I made OTR , rather if that was my own fault or not isn't relevant to this topic

It most certainly is relevant. Schneider's website, which was linked to above, clearly states that a new driver should be able to make $50,000 their first year, and at least $60,000 their second year. Those are the numbers people are going to expect you to be making as an OTR driver. So when you said you're making double what you were making OTR they would naturally assume you're making $100,000 now, which you have now clarified that you are not.

You've also changed your statement. Now you're saying

Without going into my pay details, no I am not making 6 figures in this new job or close to it. I am simply making more then what I made while I was OTR.

Well, more is a far cry from double, and I don't blame you for not going into details about it because I'm afraid it's going to show that you're clearly making less now than the average OTR driver is making. Probably much less. It simply doesn't stand to reason that an employer would give someone the opportunity to work less, be home more often, and make way more money than the drivers who are living on the road and putting in more time.

Old School is dead on the money when he points out that getting paid by the mile can make for large swings in the size of each paycheck and that really makes some people uncomfortable. They would rather have a steady, reliable paycheck even if that means their average paycheck is lower and their total overall pay is lower. Unfortunately, that makes no economic sense, but I've spoken many times over the years with people who clearly made the decision to take home less money overall simply because every paycheck was now the same size. It's a bit puzzling, but it happens.

In fact, it's this very phenomenon that has led to a number of companies recently adding "pay guarantees" as one of their perks. If you're available for work and don't refuse any loads they'll guarantee you a certain level of pay. Of course, that pay level is about 30% lower than the average OTR driver would normally make, but it still somehow makes certain people feel better.

We're all certainly happy for you that you're getting home every day now though. That seems to be a fantastic improvement for your situation, and we're thrilled to hear it. But our job is to keep it real here, and the reality is you're taking a pay cut from what a productive OTR driver will make in order to have steady paychecks and be home more often. And that's ok. I've taken jobs that paid less because they provided other advantages. So I have no problem with that.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar
Well, more is a far cry from double

No, nothing has changed beside the wording. I am making double of what I made while I was OTR. But either way, I enjoy the new job so that's fine by me.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Jamie c'mon man - shoot straight with us.

How much are you making now?

That would give this convoluted conversation some context.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Without that context you are really making some confusing statements to new people here trying to figure this career out. You guys may not realize that there are thousands of people who read these conversations without ever actually joining up as members. We do them a great disservice by saying you can quit OTR before you get your year in or even really get the hang of it and then make double your pay.

That's not "Trucking Truth." So we need you to be candid at this point. You set this up - please give us a number sir.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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