Realistic Beginner Driver Pay For Regional Drivers

Topic 26470 | Page 3

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:
Jrod's Comment
member avatar

Quoted for Truth - we could probably link a dozen or so posts from this site alone about that.

Does the non-driving job you are contemplating offer an upside of 50% second and third year.

I’ve seen people do the exact same thing you are doing, only to kick themselves a year later for prolonging their agony and limiting earning potential.

Trucking year 1 - $40,000

Trucking year 2 - $50,000

Trucking year 3 - $60,000

VS.

Non-driving job year 1 - $40,000

Non-driving job year 2 - $42,000

Non-driving job year 3 - $45,000

After 3 years trucking? $150k

After 3 years of boring office work or manual labor? $127k

(And I know its one of those 2 because you wouldn't be contemplating trucking if your non-driving, $40k job was fun and awesome)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck DrivingJohn M wrote:

G-town, I totally meant no disrespect. I’m brand new to this forum/website. I’m just trying to comb through the mountain of BS that companies desperate for workers are piling on these days.

I appreciate all of everyone’s feedback, including yours. I’m sorry if I got the tone of question wrong - if so, it was unintentional.

Interesting...

"yes", you are brand new to this forum. That much, I do agree with...

Which then, it makes no sense "why" you came off as highly skeptical, smug and stand-offish, not someone looking for information or advice. You don't know anything about this business, so how can you discredit my answer to you? Brett summed this point up perfectly...I suggest you carefully reread his reply. It's spot-on.

The mountain of BS Trucking Companies are piling on? Where? I really don't see it that way. Take a good look at this link: Trucking Company Reviews and then do a spot check to several company websites and show me the "BS".

Any of the companies represented in the above list are the top, most successful trucking companies in the industry. They did not not achieve a high level of excellence by spreading "Mountains of BS" to their prospects and candidates (or their shareholders). "Good drivers"; dedicated, safe, efficient with a highly developed work ethic, can succeed for any of the companies specified in that list. Look around on this forum; Prime, Schneider, Swift, JB Hunt, Roehl, CR England, Knight, HO Wolding, CRST (and others)...are all represented on this forum by skilled, successful highly compensated drivers making way more than 40k per year in a job they hate.

...we are here to help you cut-through the BS, especially what you might read on the internet and in "so-called" reviews...I suggest you start your path on the right foot by investing some quality time reading the information contained in these two links:

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Truck Driver's Career Guide

To reiterate what Brett, Rob and Old School have said... I post here on my free time, offer only honest, truthful and well thought-out answers. I am not here to recruit or take a referral fee, in fact I have in the past, chastened some forum members for "hard selling" their company to many a tire-kicking Newbie. The answers (and information) you'll get from me; although at times blunt and not always what you'll want to hear, the answers will be objective, truthful and selfless.

Apology accepted, thank you. Good luck.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

John, if you're reading reviews online at sites like glassdoor or indeed, that's where you'll find most of the BS. Former employees, no longer with a company for a variety of reasons. No way to fact-check the reviews, and actually no way to know if any of those open-to-anyone reviews are accurate.

Advice given here is always fair, accurate, and timely from drivers that have become successful through learning and experience.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the paystub pic. It looks like you might make closer to 50k your first year. How many hours are you usually home on weekends? What’s the over $3000 employee expense reimbursement all about?

Thank you!

double-quotes-start.png

I started in mid January, and was with a trainer until 3/22.

My check stub as of 9/6

I am hourly, northeast regional , home on weekends.

0204473001567726171.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

If you could put together two back to back jobs at a mere $12.50 per hour each, say one job during first shift and one job during second shift, you would make roughly $52k per year and be home every night, and have weekends off, too. Naturally any improvement you could make on your pay rate at either job would increase your annual pay or allow you to cut some hours at the other job. Sure, this plan is initially 80 hours of work a week, but as you are considering truck driving anyway...

;)

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Thanks for the paystub pic. It looks like you might make closer to 50k your first year. How many hours are you usually home on weekends? What’s the over $3000 employee expense reimbursement all about?

Thank you!

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I started in mid January, and was with a trainer until 3/22.

My check stub as of 9/6

I am hourly, northeast regional , home on weekends.

0204473001567726171.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

If you could put together two back to back jobs at a mere $12.50 per hour each, say one job during first shift and one job during second shift, you would make roughly $52k per year and be home every night, and have weekends off, too. Naturally any improvement you could make on your pay rate at either job would increase your annual pay or allow you to cut some hours at the other job. Sure, this plan is initially 80 hours of work a week, but as you are considering truck driving anyway...

;)

Doesn’t sound like much of a life to me

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Joseph I.'s Comment
member avatar

I can tell you my own situation. I am located in NC Iowa and work for a company that I am home every weekend and a lot of nights during the week I can park the truck in my own yard. I had no CDL experience when I started 6 months ago, I was a farmer and had 30+ years semi experience but without CDL. So I was hired but was probationary due to insurance and no prior CDL driving experience. I have received 1 raise so far and my take home after taxes and insurance with dental and vision for me and my 2 children is between $600 and $800 per week. It will keep going up down the road but that is where I am at right now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

In my brief 4 weeks otr my checks averaged 600ish.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

My first ten months regional flatbed:

0422305001567877087.jpg

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar
If you could put together two back to back jobs at a mere $12.50 per hour each, say one job during first shift and one job during second shift, you would make roughly $52k per year and be home every night, and have weekends off, too. Naturally any improvement you could make on your pay rate at either job would increase your annual pay or allow you to cut some hours at the other job. Sure, this plan is initially 80 hours of work a week, but as you are considering truck driving anyway

Or you can do like I did. 52k first year, 85k second year. Then offered a local job driving hazmat tanker, 30 per hour to start, 10 hour days, time and a half over forty, and home every night and weekend

.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More