Opportunity Or Not?

Topic 27402 | Page 1

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Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I was contacted by a friend I went to CDL school with a couple days ago. He didnt end up driving but has bought four trucks, has leased them out to a major carrier and wants me to drive one of them. We haven't talked details about pay etc yet. I'm leery about it. I wouldnt go for a few months anyways but what would all of your collective decades of experience say are the pros and cons of doing this? I am currently a company driver and live in the truck. I would be able to live in that truck also. Health insurance would be provided and at a minimum pay would be no less but probably more than I make now. If I like the pay would the cons be enormous? Fear of the unknown ya know. What concerns me most is this, if lease or o/o is hard to make money how good can the money be when the owner is having to pay a driver on top of everything else.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
I'm leery about it.

Mikey, there's this mythical idea among certain groups of truckers who think working for smaller companies is superior to working for a large company. I say it's "mythical" because I don't personally know of anyone who has found it to be true.

You have good reason to be leery.

Why Small Trucking Companies Are A Disaster Waiting To Happen

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Mikey shares concerns:

What concerns me most is this, if lease or o/o is hard to make money how good can the money be when the owner is having to pay a driver on top of everything else.

To me, change this question into a statement and you'll answer your own question.

Competition among the Big Dogs is already razor thin. They have deep pockets and buying power and experts running various parts of the company.

And your classmate, who has about as much trucking experience so you want to jump into that pool with four (not new) trucks?

Just my 2ยข>. Old School, who's been there/done that as far as running multiple trucks will have the definitive opinion.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I would decline the offer, a 4 truck operation will be unable to support you like a large company can.

How long have you had your license? There is a good chance he hasn't checked insurance rates on you or will run you with out insurance.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

There's no way I'd leave a solid secure job to go with a four truck operation that's leasing on to a larger company. There are way too many opportunities for failure.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I agree with everyone here, Mikey. I wrote that article about small trucking companies being a disaster waiting to happen.

You'll notice that almost all of our moderators and highly experienced drivers choose to work for large carriers even though they can go anywhere they like.

In my 15 year career, I worked for every size and type of company imaginable. I chose to spend the last six years of my OTR career at a major carrier (U.S. Xpress) because they were by far the best places to work.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

We had someone on here within the past year that did this same thing-Patrick. It did not work out for him really soon after starting to drive for a friend of his, and ended up being a learning experience.

What qualifies your friend as a small business owner by operating a small fleet? Just going out and getting a few trucks, then putting some of his buddies behind the wheel?

What's his business plan?

Did you discuss how taxes and such would be withheld? Would you be on a -1099?

What would you possibly gain that would improve your bottom line by driving for him?

Tell him thanks, but no thanks. Stay where you are.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the advice. I guess I just needed confirmation that my spidey senses were right. I figured if yall could give me good reasons to do it I would consider it but astounding NO from all confirms my thoughts. Thanks.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the advice. I guess I just needed confirmation that my spidey senses were right. I figured if yall could give me good reasons to do it I would consider it but astounding NO from all confirms my thoughts. Thanks.

Patrick (LDRSHP) went back to his ORIGINAL company, H.O. Wolding, after the 4 or so tractor gig didn't work out. My husband drove for USX, as well..not as long as Brett, however...then went on to FX/LH and hated teaming..and doubles. Year or so thereafter, found a 'local/intrastate' tanker gig, five power units, 5 tanks. Hauled asphalt (hot, not hazmat...) made great money for a couple years until the boss got a nasty divorce and the wife person got 4 tractors...boss was left with one, that BOSS runs. Think he lost the asphalt gig; we've seen him pulling flats with the sad, dented Petercar.

We were lucky, in that husband person found a great gig with almost 400 power units, and over 1000 trailers; dedicated. He will never entertain anything less than a larger company.

Best of luck to ya, Mikey. Glad you got your answers.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

How many businesses has he run before driving and now leasing those 4 trucks? There is so much to know about the truck side and the driver side. If he's a beginner at trucking, I'd be very leery of working for him.

I should have known better, but being an easy going person, I allowed my former boss to get away with a lot...no pay statements, no 2018 W2, pay 1 to 3 days late sometimes are some of the things he did. In Aug, when a check he deposited was returned NSF, I got hold of the company he was leasing my truck from. They took the truck from him and hired me as a company driver. They backed up my employment date to the last time they paid him. So, unfortunately, I am also owed 2300 miles. His problem started with leasing 3 trucks and hiring drivers for them. Being used, tho not out of warranty, 2 of the 3 were in the shop a lot. He apparently did not have money saved up and he got to where he couldn't pay his employees and other bills. Another driver has taken him to small claims court and my case is in the system now. I won't ever work for someone that leases his trucks. Laura

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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