What's The Strangest "rule" You've Encountered At Customer?

Topic 27413 | Page 1

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Rob T.'s Comment
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Picking up a load at Red Star Yeast this morning in Cedar Rapids IA and they require you to wear hairnets on top of head and facial hair, safety glasses and a hard hat. You walk through the shipping door and its maybe 5 feet before you get to an enclosed room for your paperwork. You're no where near any product.

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What is the strangest rule or policy you've encountered at a customer?

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

What is a "customer"??

I've heard from our P&D drivers we have one "customer" who takes LTL companies right away to avoid detention pay. They only have 1 door so if a OTR driver is there they make them move, have the LTL guy pull in unload usually 2 pallets then finish the OTR driver.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
You're no where near any product.

Along these lines, picking up a trailer drop and hook style at a paper mill. A nice warm summer day, I was wearing shorts, and missed the sign saying long pants were required.

A supervisor caught me in the trailer yard. All the loaded trailers were sealed, I was in a trailer yard of all places. I had to get into the sleeper and put on the long pants or I would have been kicked out & reported.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Also the CAT plant makes people have steel toe boots, hard hat, goggles and hearing protection to drop and hook a trailer in a lot a couple miles from the factory.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

PackRat's Comment
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Every Menards store I've delivered at has docks that are graded downhill by at least 2% grade. They want us to use wheel chocks on both sides of the trailer tires.

So far, I've never encountered a trailer rolling away uphill.

PlanB's Comment
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Picking up at egg farms and their bio-security protocols are fun. First question me on the last 3 loads I've done, specifically if I've hauled any poultry. Then I'm issued the exact paper smock, hair/beard net, and foot nets that I had to wear during my wife's C-sections. Not allowed out of the truck while on the property, but if you absolutely must exit the truck you must wear all the issued protective stuff. Truck goes through a machine that sprays the truck and trailer exterior down with some sort of cleaner. Dang spray left a nasty white residue all over my truck. An employee meets you at the dock and will pull your tandem release so you can slide them to the rear, and open your rear doors so you can back in. When loading finished they will come out to close and seal the trailer doors, and release the tandems again so you can slide them up a bit. They'll hand you the paperwork through your window and direct you to leave the property.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Plan B I totally forgot about the egg farms! I pickup at an egg farm probably every other week. We have probably 15 every week. We drive through the sanitizer to get the (bottom) of the truck/trailer clean. That's recent for where we pickup, before last year they required all trucks to get a truck wash. They give us the same protective gear but we're still required to do our tandems and opening doors etc. I'm always asked something to the affect of "have you been in an area with live chickens in the last 3 weeks?" I always want to smack em upside the head and say I seen ya a couple weeks ago!

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

Every Menards store I've delivered at has docks that are graded downhill by at least 2% grade. They want us to use wheel chocks on both sides of the trailer tires.

So far, I've never encountered a trailer rolling away uphill.

I can confirm this.

On a side note.... Quite possibly the worst places to deliver on a saturday afternoon. Nothing but people in 4 wheelers never even noticing a giant truck with a 53 ft trailer trying desperately to maneuver into dock while they fly all over looking for a 2x4.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

The worst I've encountered was a shipper that wouldnt let me use the bathroom. They had a sign in the shipping area going in that said no public restroom. I asked where the bathroom was and they told me the same, no public restroom to which I replied that I wasnt the public I was transporting their product. Still, no restroom allowed. They thought a previous trucker might have stolen something from the locker room/ men's room so blanket policy, no restroom usage. It was at least 45 minutes to a truck friendly place to go. I had no bottle to go in. That was the one and only time I have peed on a shipper or receivers lot. (I know I know but what ya gonna do?)

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

The worst I've encountered was a shipper that wouldnt let me use the bathroom. They had a sign in the shipping area going in that said no public restroom. I asked where the bathroom was and they told me the same, no public restroom to which I replied that I wasnt the public I was transporting their product. Still, no restroom allowed. They thought a previous trucker might have stolen something from the locker room/ men's room so blanket policy, no restroom usage. It was at least 45 minutes to a truck friendly place to go. I had no bottle to go in. That was the one and only time I have peed on a shipper or receivers lot. (I know I know but what ya gonna do?)

Being LTL we run into a few places like that. "No Public Restrooms". But if you're LTL it's ok.

Their explanation is OTR drivers bring in bags of human waste and deposit it into the trash cans; wash dishes, clothes, etc., and generally just **** the place up.

Not my words - theirs.

The local FedEx Ground terminal - which is contractors - has a sign in the bathroom - NO HUMAN WASTE IN THE TRASH CAN!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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