Going North!

Topic 27467 | Page 3

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Andrew J.'s Comment
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Make sure you go to a Kwik trip in wisconsin. I wish all truck stops were like Kwik trip. Most are gas stations but some are truck stops. The ones that are truck stops have plenty of parking and good food and they’re very clean too. The people are very polite behind the register. Tomah and maustin on I 90 are a few ones if you’re headed that way.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Make sure you go to a Kwik trip in wisconsin. I wish all truck stops were like Kwik trip. Most are gas stations but some are truck stops. The ones that are truck stops have plenty of parking and good food and they’re very clean too. The people are very polite behind the register. Tomah and maustin on I 90 are a few ones if you’re headed that way.

Most of their food is reasonably priced as well compared to other truck stops. Donna, if you stop there make sure you snap a picture of the bagel display for Bobcat smile.gif Where in Wisconsin are you headed?

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Maybe you have a memory impediment.

I know drivers need to experience snow, but sometimes wish they could do it elsewhere. So annoying to be tooling around on a normal winter day and come up behind someone who has never seen a snowflake before. If you feel it’s the worst snowstorm you’ve ever seen and feel unsafe doing over 40 on the interstate , park somewhere, so us local guys can get our work done. Please. 😄

This is what YOU said. No mention of 15 mph. No mention of white knuckling or dotted lines. Only your "annoyance" of anyone who can't do over 40.

That statement does a great disservice to all new drivers. You backtracked only after being called out for it. C'mon man.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Sorry Donna. Have fun and be safe!

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Turtle, let me try a different way of getting my thought across. This pic, taken at work:

0093206001579957526.jpg

Because I know this road very well, because I grew up literally a few miles from here, because I've spent my whole life dealing with this weather, because I was loaded heavy, because I have the best snow tires all the way around that money can buy--I was doing 45 mph on this road on this night. Does that make me a supertrucker? No, I'm just very confident in my abilities in this situation. Do you think a Donna is going to do 45 on this road on this night? Doubtful. So is it unfair to be annoyed when I come upon a Donna doing a speed that she's comfortable at and I have to either follow her for the next twenty miles or work on passing her and creating an even more dangerous situation?

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Andhe78 tells his story:

Because I know this road very well, ... I was doing 45 mph on this road on this night. ... I'm just very confident in my abilities in this situation. ... So is it unfair to be annoyed when I come upon [someone] doing a speed that she's comfortable at and I have to either follow her for the next twenty miles or work on passing her and creating an even more dangerous situation?

No, it's not unfair to be annoyed. Keep in mind that the only driver in the road you have control over is yourself. And since all sorts of people are driving on the public roads you need to be prepared at all times and in all conditions for any level of driving ability and adjust your own driving to accommodate that.

Too bad so sad that it's 20 miles to the next passing lane. Don't try tailgating in a dangerous situation - the driver you are intimidating may get into an accident or, worse, you could cause your own accident.

Math problem: the difference between your 45 mph and slow poke's 30 mph? (Answer: 15 mph) How much time out of your day/ life is really taken up here? 1 minute, 15 seconds are lost. Do you want to possibly cause a spinout or run you or someone else off the road to save one effing minute?

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

0303090001579961498.jpg0659214001579961528.jpg0810061001579961566.jpg

Here's three Super Truckers that had everything under control, too. I'm sure these guys also share a low opinion of inexperienced drivers that drive too slowly on snow-covered roads, just like andhe78.

Who wants some more Koolaid?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Patience.

It’s a fundamental part of our job. Especially during inclement weather. Start losing your cool because someone exercises a more conservative approach to safe driving on a snow covered road, and you actually become the problem. Not them.

Expect to be delayed in situations like this. It’s unrealistic and potentially dangerous to think and conduct your business otherwise. Accept it, adjust accordingly and be patient.

Sorry Man..., but you are clearly alone on this issue.

Be safe.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Turtle, let me try a different way of getting my thought across. This pic, taken at work:

0093206001579957526.jpg

Because I know this road very well, because I grew up literally a few miles from here, because I've spent my whole life dealing with this weather, because I was loaded heavy, because I have the best snow tires all the way around that money can buy--I was doing 45 mph on this road on this night. Does that make me a supertrucker? No, I'm just very confident in my abilities in this situation. Do you think a Donna is going to do 45 on this road on this night? Doubtful. So is it unfair to be annoyed when I come upon a Donna doing a speed that she's comfortable at and I have to either follow her for the next twenty miles or work on passing her and creating an even more dangerous situation?

And what about loads?

Maybe you are close to Maximum GVWR and she is hauling air? wtf.gif

GVWR:

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

GVWR is the maximum operating weight of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer, minus any trailers.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Donna, the key to keeping warm is usually layers - especially when physically active or going from active to inactive or warm to cold frequently. Also breathability (of clothing).

Yes a good warm coat will work but a windbreaker with vents and a removable liner (over a moisture-wicking zip-neck turtleneck and maybe an indulated vest) is better. As you are moving around (drop and hook, securement, doors, etc.) you can regulate your heat so you don't sweat, get wet and then cold. I bought a high-visibility Tingley on sale at Blains Farm and Fleet for under $100 which rocks! Has dual YKK (good stuff) zippers so it covers hips but won't restrict movement, cause issues sitting, etc.. WAY BETTER than $180 Carhart.

Avoid cotton!

good-luck.gif

https://www.tingleyrubber.com/collections/jackets/products/icon-3-1-jacket

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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