Well This Sucks :( Sent Home From Prime

Topic 27473 | Page 2

Page 2 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

The only trucking videos on YouTube that I can take? Our own Kiersten (Rainy D.)....

"Trucking With Kersey"

smile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gif

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Old School started there and was a success.

You know which is a better source of info about trucking companies:

A. Online reviews

B. Bathroom stall walls

C. Trucking Truth

???

For relationship advice I'd go with "B". Trucking advice is always "C".

smile.gif

Turtle Protege (formerly 's Comment
member avatar

The only trucking videos on YouTube that I can take? Our own Kiersten (Rainy D.)....

"Trucking With Kersey"

smile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gif

She's live now

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Good luck at Western, Harvest. With a couple of black marks now on your record, you need to go into this with the determination to see it all the way through.

Forget the reviews. Forget the pay. None of that matters. You can be equally successful, wherever you go. Focus on being the best driver you can be. Show Western you have what it takes. Stick it out no matter what gets thrown at you. Put your time in, pay your dues, and see it through. You can do this.

You once told me that driving a truck was your ultimate dream. Lean on that dream to help you get this done. Good luck man, let us know how it's going.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe there aren’t many positive reviews because those drivers are busy making themselves, and their company, money.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
I am leaving this Tuesday for orientation at Western Express. I am a little nervous because I see allot of negative reviews online for this company. Does anyone here have experience with them?

You've had some really excellent advice in this conversation. I hope you're paying attention. I started my career at Western Express. Let's talk about your situation. You've got a lot of things working against you. First you quit trucking once already. Secondly, you've got this idea that the company needs a certain quality to it so you can make a go at trucking. You asked us...

do you guy's know any decent companies?

Third, and I think this is big, one of your top concerns appears to be home time. There's nothing wrong with going home. I cherish my home time, but when I see newbies prioritizing it I generally end up seeing them flounder at this at best.

Let's go through these one at a time. You've already given up once before. We understand how difficult it is to start a trucking career. You do too - you've been here before. You've got to resolve to get through this first year. Forget any ideas you have about getting your three months in at Western Express and then going back to Prime. That's a huge mistake. It will only hinder your ability to learn the concepts you need for success at trucking, and reinforce your false expectations that make you think your success will be generated by the company who is paying you.

What you're going through now is absolutely the best thing that could happen to you. You are being forced to reckon with the realities of success in trucking. You are in the real arena. Everything about becoming a successful trucker is bearing down on you. It's a test - a big test. You've got to do well on it. If not, it's highly doubtful you'll end up ever really breaking through to becoming a Top Tier Driver.

Stay the course. Make a solid commitment to stay at Western Express for one full year. Every time you get a lousy paycheck don't do like every other loser does and start thinking, "Man, this company sucks!" Take it for what it really is. It's a powerful message to you that says, "Okay Harvest, here's a measurement of your performance last week. It wasn't so good was it? What are you gonna do this week to change that?"

Honestly, in trucking you should let your paycheck speak to you like that. If it only speaks to you about how bad the company you're working for is, then you've lost the battle, and you don't understand how critical your actions are to elevating your experience and enjoyment of the trucking career.

I made right at fifty thousand dollars my rookie year at Western Express. That same year a law firm was trying to get me to join their class action lawsuit against Western Express accusing them of not allowing their drivers to make minimum wage. Ask yourself why those drivers were making so little while I was doing so well. If you can figure out the answer, you're on your way to the top!

You've got to do away with this idea that this company or that one will be better, or do better, at helping you succeed. Nobody holds your hand in trucking. Honestly I thank my lucky stars I started at a company that had terrible reviews. It motivated me to figure it out. I still spend an inordinate amount of time as an ambassador testifying of the things I learned by starting and succeeding at a place where so many failed.

People don't fail at Western Express because it's a bad environment or bad company. They fail because they harbor toxic incriminating thoughts that they've allowed other losers to plant in their minds. Western Express is giving you a shot when others wouldn't. That's what they did for me. They are doing the same for probably every person in your orientation group. That's why most of them will fail. They are already jaded, and they will do just about anything to influence you into following their idealistic beliefs that they deserve better. They will swear the company is taking advantage of you, and the best thing you can do for yourself is leave as soon as possible. Hear me - that's a huge mistake on your part.

Now, here's why I think making home time a priority is a rookie mistake that causes a lot of grief for truck driver wannabes. It's such a challenge establishing yourself as an OTR truck driver, that your focus has got to be on doing just that - establishing your career. For rookie drivers I believe it best to go home once a month. Not everyone will agree with that, but I still think it's solid advice. Whatever you do, make sure you're focused on being the best you can be at this. That's a commitment that requires diligence.

Here's a little list of five priorities for you as a new driver. If you can commit to these and prove you're able to do them consistently, you'll build a great relationship with your dispatcher. That relationship is paramount to your success.

1) Be Safe

2) Be Productive

3) Be Efficient

4) Be Respectful

5) Be Trustworthy

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Harvest's Comment
member avatar

Thank you everyone, this is exactly the advice that I needed. I know this first year is going to be tough but it will be a great learning experience and make me a better driver. When the road is getting me down I just have to remember the excitement I had when I first got into a big rig. Turtle can tell you, my smile never stopped that day when I first saw the inside of a truck! That is something I am truly working on myself with, I had a bad habit of giving up when things got tough. I am sure Turtle could see that during parts of my PSD training when I really didn't think I could pass the test. But forcing myself to get through it was worth it, and I felt huge accomplishment when I passed my test. I need to remember that if I ever get frustrated on the road.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

One day at a time, Harvest.

Some days will be great, and some days will truly suck to the point you'll wonder why anybody would want to earn a living driving a truck.

Learn enough stuff on those bad days, and eventually you'll not have too many bad days.

Every journey starts with beginning.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris L's Comment
member avatar

I'll echo the same sentiment that has been posted by the others. You are going to have good weeks with alot of miles and some weeks with low miles. Believe me this past year I've been up and down the scale when it comes to miles. For a while I thought I had been exiled to deliver and pick up in Northern Jersey.....lol. I currently drive for a Mid size (800+) trucking company that primarily operates mid Atlantic region. I'm out on the road for the week mostly leaving on Sunday night and getting back to the home terminal late Friday afternoon / evening. Depending on what you plan to do one you finish your training (OTR or regional) take everything that comes your way show your FM that you are committed make yourself the "Go to rookie" that your FM can call on in a pinch. Of course the caviat to that is it's not going to happen over night it's not like you start driving solo Monday and your FM calls you on Tuesday with a got to be there load. You are going to have to prove yourself. I can count on one hand how many times I've had to decline an assignment and the two times was because of maintenance issues with my truck. When the days suck just remember embrace the suck! Learn all you can during your training and ask questions and you will be successful. Good luck in your training and see you down the road.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Harvest's Comment
member avatar

First day here at Western! Did the usual stuff so far, drug test, paperwork. Apparently orientation is usually only 2 days for dry van. So I should be on the road no later than Friday!

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Page 2 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More