Well This Sucks :( Sent Home From Prime

Topic 27473 | Page 5

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Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I understand your frustration, but think you should consider Prime's position, Harvest.

They initially paid to bus you to your first orientation last summer. They paid for your hotel and food during your orientation period. Then they paid me $850 to train you for your CDL , and paid you $250 for that also. They absorbed the cost of the truck, insurance, and related expenses during your PSD phase. A phase that, I might add, produced far less revenue than would be produced from a truck operated by an experienced driver.

Prime invested a lot of time, effort, and money into your training in hopes that you would someday become a productive driver. You quit on them during the TNT phase, so all of the aforementioned investment was put to waste.

Yet they offered to bring you back again under the assumption your slate was still clean, which it wasn't.

You should be thankful they even gave you a second chance instead of griping over some gas money.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

Harvest,

Don't know if you Googled "Say Anything" and "Gas and Sip," but this is the point that I was trying to make with humor: ask those complainers, "If Western Express is a second chance company, why are you here?" The obvious answer is that they are second chance drivers who need a second chance company.

I have some experience with 12-step programs. The people who succeed at those programs do so because they listen to the stories of all the "losers" at the meeting and say "I belong here." It's that attitude of taking responsibility for the decisions in one's life that makes that person decide to turn his life around by changing his attitude and behavior. "If nothing changes, nothing changes."

So my question to you regarding the "complain, blame, and criticize" people you've already found there, is are you going to join them?

Or are you going to recognize that you are there is because you belong there. But that doesn't mean that you need to stay there, or worse that you get to the point where need to look for a "third chance" company.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

And, to follow on Protege's sage commentary... being there means you GOT that second chance. Don't squander the good fortune that landed you there. Your second chance employment is Kind of like the end of Private Ryan... "earn it".

Let the gas money go, chalk it up to a lesson learned, and move forward. Your new employer isn't going to want to catch a whiff of u complaining about your former employer. It does nothing to support their taking a chance on you, because by your own statements as background info, they did.

Not intended as flaming, but also i opted to be honest and drop the diplomatic tone. There is a disney (i think) tune called let it go. You should. Or don't. Your success or lack thereof rests in YOUR hands.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

This is all excellent advice guys! That's what I love about this group, they talk straight. Truth isn't always easily digested. It may seem like bitter medicine at times. It's curative powers will eventually work wonders for us as long as we take what we need.

Harvest, I was immediately concerned when I saw your comments about the reimbursement issues. You can't let something like that put you on a downward spiral. Focus on your current situation. Do everything you can to be the best driver Western Express has ever seen. That effort will push you to the point of understanding how to be successful at this.

It takes a lot of commitment and passion to succeed at trucking. That takes serious work. It's always easier to play the blame game and be critical of the company. That approach relieves us from accepting responsibility for our shortcomings. It's also easier because almost everyone we are around takes that approach. I have yet to meet a room full of successful truckers. I meet them one at a time. Anytime I'm in a group of truckers they are the whining complaining types who are constantly moving from one company to the next. They're on a continuous quest for that super secret trucking company that will treat them with the respect they are certain they deserve.

CajunWon's Comment
member avatar

Does anyone know if 'Harvest' had to pay Prime the Contract amount for CDL Training Or if someone in a similar situation would today have to pay off that contract?

From reading this thread: He passed and obtained his CDL just prior to the DAC results kicked him out. And he was definitely past the 7 day grace period. Seems this situation was on Prime for not vetting, but contract states otherwise. He only complained about gas money.

tia

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Where you live doesent play into most of us drive lower 48 so getting back home is usually real do able home weekly?? Maybe but your not gonna make any money that way not at 1st 3 weeks out 3 days home is what I run sometimes longer depending on how much money I wanna bring in didn’t no they could get you over a tarp !! Bad break I would do what bret said call and have a civil conversation with them and try and get that fixed ! A tarp my buddy just got issued tarps with holes in them he said something they gave him a patch kit

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And how does hometime usually work if the terminal is far away? Do most companies let you bring the truck home?

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I've never lived near my terminal. I live in Texas. When I was with Western Express my terminal was in Nashville, TN. Now that I'm driving for Knight, my terminal is in Gulfport. MS. Have you noticed how these OTR companies have what they call "hiring areas?" Those are areas of the country they are hauling freight to. Their hiring areas may not even be close to a terminal. When you want to go home they find you some freight that goes near your home. After you've delivered it you'll take the truck home and enjoy done time off.

Some of us are fortunate enough to be able to park at our homes. Others will usually find a nearby truck stop or a large store or place of business that allows them parking privileges while they are at home.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
CajunWon's Comment
member avatar

Apologies, didn't mean to bring up such an old post. Just trying to ease fears due to reported high turnover within the 1st year.

Also watching videos of those in early training. Hard to know if some of these inspire, or discourage me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuKqa2myj-0

Does anyone know if 'Harvest' had to pay Prime the Contract amount for CDL Training Or if someone in a similar situation would today have to pay off that contract?

From reading this thread: He passed and obtained his CDL just prior to the DAC results kicked him out. And he was definitely past the 7 day grace period. Seems this situation was on Prime for not vetting, but contract states otherwise. He only complained about gas money.

tia

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Lol I did it again

Does anyone know if 'Harvest' had to pay Prime the Contract amount for CDL Training Or if someone in a similar situation would today have to pay off that contract?

From reading this thread: He passed and obtained his CDL just prior to the DAC results kicked him out. And he was definitely past the 7 day grace period. Seems this situation was on Prime for not vetting, but contract states otherwise. He only complained about gas money.

tia

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Lol I did it again

double-quotes-start.png

Does anyone know if 'Harvest' had to pay Prime the Contract amount for CDL Training Or if someone in a similar situation would today have to pay off that contract?

From reading this thread: He passed and obtained his CDL just prior to the DAC results kicked him out. And he was definitely past the 7 day grace period. Seems this situation was on Prime for not vetting, but contract states otherwise. He only complained about gas money.

tia

double-quotes-end.png

Gonna start calling you Britney / Twitney, hahaha!!

Jammer's Jam!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Lol

Lol

double-quotes-start.png

Lol I did it again

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Does anyone know if 'Harvest' had to pay Prime the Contract amount for CDL Training Or if someone in a similar situation would today have to pay off that contract?

From reading this thread: He passed and obtained his CDL just prior to the DAC results kicked him out. And he was definitely past the 7 day grace period. Seems this situation was on Prime for not vetting, but contract states otherwise. He only complained about gas money.

tia

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Gonna start calling you Britney / Twitney, hahaha!!

Jammer's Jam!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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