Interesting Conversation With A Driver

Topic 28601 | Page 1

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I was out in Aurora Illinois picking up at Kraft today and my D&H wasn't ready. I was parked in front of the trailer they'd be loading it on while waiting for my dispatcher to come in to get approval to come back empty because the load still had 3 hours before it'd be ready and Kraft is about 4:20 away from our yard with about 5 1/2 hours left on my 14.

I was sitting there just minding my business trying to take a nap and a driver taps on my door. He begins to talk badly about daycabs and he'd NEVER drive one because real drivers are out on the highways. I told him I'm out of Des Moines and this particular route is just over 600 miles. He then got started ranting about hating Iowa because the cops are out to get him. Nearly everytime he passes through he gets nabbed for speeding or overweight violations. He supposedly has lawyers on speed dial in Iowa, Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia due to the tickets he's received. He also flat out refuses any load going to Cali because they're also out to get him. He even went so far as to say local police don't need to be defunded, but the DOT and troopers do!

It was difficult to get a read on the guy if he was being serious but he seemed very proud of how many times he's been ticketed. If only there were a way to not get speeding or overweight tickets!

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Any Black Helicopters hovering around this guy? I'll call him a "Kraft Rat", since that's where you met him.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Rob doesn't know how to do this

If only there were a way to not get speeding or overweight tickets!

Stay out of Iowa, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee and California. Obviously. Weren't you paying attention?

Or just drive a governed daycab.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Nearly everytime he passes through he gets nabbed for speeding or overweight violations.

It's a tough life out here, but when you are targeted by the law for your repeated violations, it just makes it tougher. That guys remarks remind me of one of my Dad's regular sayings, "Life is hard on ignorant folks."

Donna M.'s Comment
member avatar

Now why would he talk ugly about Georgia? Lived there all my life haven’t got a ticket. Been driving a semi almost two years no ticket. We’re really nice people in Georgia. πŸ˜‡πŸ˜‡πŸ˜‡πŸ˜‡πŸ˜‡

Yuuyo Y.'s Comment
member avatar

Real drivers work foodservice and back up 48 foot trailers in residential neighbourhoods into retirement home parking lots uphill with lots of low hanging trees, snow and ice on the ground, and cars parked on both sides of the street and around the entrance to the lot. rofl-2.gif

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

And DON'T get speeding, and overweight tickets duhhhhh

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah I was at a pickup in Lodi, CA and a grumpy OTR driver told me how much he hates local drivers. Apparently we cut him off a lot and we pretend to be privileged at shippers and receivers by skipping in line.

I would love to see him get a trailer with 18 different deliveries and see how well he does.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I was at a pickup in Lodi, CA and a grumpy OTR driver told me how much he hates local drivers. Apparently we cut him off a lot and we pretend to be privileged at shippers and receivers by skipping in line.

I would love to see him get a trailer with 18 different deliveries and see how well he does.

FedEx starts charging detention at 15 minutes. That usually makes recievers reprioritize who they're unloading. Or we can come back tomorrow with a redelivery charge. Their call.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I had one guy at a truck stop tell me I can't park there since I'm not a real trucker to him day cabs and especially linehaul don't count.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More