Newbie Trucker Dad Giving Advice - And Stories

Topic 29846 | Page 5

Page 5 of 5 Previous Page Go To Page:
Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

I thought he took the dollar general amount 4 months ago?

Like others have said, you have to loosen the reigns a little bit. It seems like everytime your son has an issue, you run in screaming "not my baby!". You can't keep sending him links for different companies because he has some bad days.

His income levels are normal for somebody starting out and learning their craft. Was be supposed to be making 80-100k his first year? That's not realistic.

Being a truck driver isn't just getting from point A to point B. There's a lot of planning and time management that goes into it. These things are learned and if he jumps on this site, he can read it all on his own to absorb it at his pace. He doesn't have to participate or create an account, just read it.

"Experienced drivers say it's a good company". That's very subjective and in case you weren't aware, your son isn't an experienced driver. He's not going into that company with the perspective of an experienced driver. If he keeps starting over, it'll take a lot longer to become an experienced driver because he has to start learning all the account/corporate stuff first and leaning that.

Let your son figure this out. You're making it more difficult by b spinning him circles and then pushing him out.

I don't know why you are confused about what I said. He started driving for a big carrier 7.5 months ago, originally team OTR , switched to the DG account after his team driver went solo and took the truck.

Nobody has said loosen the reins and none are attached. We haven't pushed him out. He has made all the choices and applied for all the jobs. I did show him a good job listing 10 days ago which he applied for and got hired for that. Where do you come up with this "spinning in circles" comment? I gave a lot of details on his experiences to explain why he decided to leave. We have supported him in his decisions like any decent parent would do.

Nobody said he was expecting to make 80-100k his first year. Nobody in his fleet is averaging what is advertised for the fleet and rarely does anybody exceed what is advertised as the weekly average. His new job guarantees much more.

Two experienced members from this forum have told me privately that his new employer is a fantastic company.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I thought he took the dollar general amount 4 months ago?

Like others have said, you have to loosen the reigns a little bit. It seems like everytime your son has an issue, you run in screaming "not my baby!". You can't keep sending him links for different companies because he has some bad days.

His income levels are normal for somebody starting out and learning their craft. Was be supposed to be making 80-100k his first year? That's not realistic.

Being a truck driver isn't just getting from point A to point B. There's a lot of planning and time management that goes into it. These things are learned and if he jumps on this site, he can read it all on his own to absorb it at his pace. He doesn't have to participate or create an account, just read it.

"Experienced drivers say it's a good company". That's very subjective and in case you weren't aware, your son isn't an experienced driver. He's not going into that company with the perspective of an experienced driver. If he keeps starting over, it'll take a lot longer to become an experienced driver because he has to start learning all the account/corporate stuff first and leaning that.

Let your son figure this out. You're making it more difficult by b spinning him circles and then pushing him out.

double-quotes-end.png

I don't know why you are confused about what I said. He started driving for a big carrier 7.5 months ago, originally team OTR , switched to the DG account after his team driver went solo and took the truck.

Nobody has said loosen the reins and none are attached. We haven't pushed him out. He has made all the choices and applied for all the jobs. I did show him a good job listing 10 days ago which he applied for and got hired for that. Where do you come up with this "spinning in circles" comment? I gave a lot of details on his experiences to explain why he decided to leave. We have supported him in his decisions like any decent parent would do.

Nobody said he was expecting to make 80-100k his first year. Nobody in his fleet is averaging what is advertised for the fleet and rarely does anybody exceed what is advertised as the weekly average. His new job guarantees much more.

Two experienced members from this forum have told me privately that his new employer is a fantastic company.

You said he's been doing the dollar general account for 4 months in your first post.

The fact that your here asking questions on his behalf is evidence that you're way too involved, whether you see it or not.

Spinning in circles comment: you're giving him bad advice. You don't know anything about this industry and you have no experience in it. Bouncing around companies is frowned upon and will limit his options at some point. You're encouraging him to do that by sending him links.

The money issue. You said he's making between 450 and something else weekly. That's normal for a novice. He has nothing to offer anybody and he's still figuring everything out. Give him a chance to do that.

I never said anything about his new company. I don't comment on companies I've never worked for and you haven't named a company for me to say anything about them.

I'm curious to know how members of this forum contacted you privately, when there's no private message feature here, you haven't named a single company and there's no contact info in your bio.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I think I scared away the successful and genetically tested Harvey

confused.gif

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

I think I scared away the successful and genetically tested Harvey

confused.gif

rofl-2.gif rofl-3.gif rofl-1.gif

Considering I have genetically tested my bucks (male goats) and a few does (females), this struck my funny bone!

Laura

rofl-1.gif rofl-3.gif rofl-1.gif

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

Because you got him on his bs. Who members contacted him privately about a company he never mentioned. You beat me to it. Naturally, I had to check the gps tracker when he first posted and it showed him in the middle of a desert. Closest thing was a truck stop rest area but it still looked pretty far away. The whole thing was weird. I was also confused by him saying his “applied” for four different positions. Unless I’m missing something driver is just one position.

I think I scared away the successful and genetically tested Harvey

confused.gif

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

SMHS

Troll

Page 5 of 5 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More