Bent Bat Wings (cab Extenders)

Topic 30779 | Page 1

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Davy A.'s Comment
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When I got my truck, the cab extenders were bent (I think) All the other Kenworths I have seen, they are straight. Each side of mine has a crease and is bent, in the same location and the same way. I thought they were made that way for the first few months, I didnt know that much about the truck, so I never noted them down on the transfer form (which my office didnt even request a form). The previous driver who had the truck, had the 5th wheel platform all the way forward (towards the cab), Im assuming, given the state the truck was in when I got it, that he crunched the extenders. My DM was aware of that and will have them replaced or fixed when we have time.

The nagging question in my mind though is "Did I crunch them further or add to the damage and not know about it?" I constantly look at them every day or two and keep thinking that they might be bent further. Although I pay extra attention when Im backing and or turning not to turn too far. Im probably just obsessing as usual over them, but I want to make sure that Im not over turning and I cant say for sure that I never had them touch, Ive had some hard spots with very little room at times and I didnt realize that they were bent until I had been driving the truck for more than a month.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Next time you’re backing and it seems you’re turning really tight, Get Out And Look to see if they ever touched.

Drive on!

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

What I do when I get a different truck, is to take pictures of it all the way around from the top, down to the bottom. If there are areas that have damage, I then take pictures that are close-ups. I have the date set up on all my pictures that I take and I have different folders. I label one for the company and put all the pictures in there. I keep those pictures for a while after I'm taken out of the truck. That way if I'm getting a used vehicle and there have been others driving it before me, I can point to the pictures if there's ever a question.

Laura

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

The way you describe the damage...

Each side of mine has a crease and is bent, in the same location and the same way.

That makes me think someone jumped the pin when backing up under a trailer, and bumped the cab extenders against the trailer. I can't say for sure, but that is what the damage description sounds like to me. It is possible that it was that way before you got the truck. Have you ever jumped the pin when backing up under a trailer?

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

The way you describe the damage...

double-quotes-start.png

Each side of mine has a crease and is bent, in the same location and the same way.

double-quotes-end.png

That makes me think someone jumped the pin when backing up under a trailer, and bumped the cab extenders against the trailer. I can't say for sure, but that is what the damage description sounds like to me. It is possible that it was that way before you got the truck. Have you ever jumped the pin when backing up under a trailer?

Never, I always stop at the rear drives, check height and sight the pin, adjust as needed and then back under it, then do two tug tests after hooked.

It was like that when I got the truck. I thought that was how they looked stock. It wasn't until a month or two later that I realized they were definitely not normal. Just my inexperience.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

I am slightly fearful of crunching mine. I actually jumped the pin on this trip, but luckily I didn't crunch the sleeper/cab extenders..... Also very thankful that I knew how to fix it because of this forum! (Less than 2 minutes, no frustration)

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

You only need to "High Hook/overshoot the pin", 1 time ! lol then you won't ever again! My 1st time luckily I only needed a coke can, to hold plate level, to pull out, and hook it right

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

You only need to "High Hook/overshoot the pin", 1 time ! lol then you won't ever again!

Well I did it twice! Slow learner?

Nothing crunched, but the second time, I was grabbing a preload at the Coke plant in Atlanta. In August. With a 45,000 lbs load....

I think it took more than a half hour to crank that trailer up enough to clear the fifth wheel plate. No airbag dump valve on that particular truck.

Never EVER again for this dummy! I don't care if there's a firefight with nuclear weapons, involving rabies-infected flocks of hummingbirds outside the cab....I always get out and make sure everything is correct, just as Davy described.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

I was thought something extremely helpful when it came to this. If you look at a Schneider trailer by the nose of the trailer you’ll see “lift point”. The way I was taught was the second your batwing starts to cover “lift point” you are getting close. When it disappears under your batwing you are about to crunch it.

Now I know most trailers may not have lift point written on the side but you maybe able to find something to reference whenever you have to jackknife for a back.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I just watch my cab extenders in the mirror when I turn. 🤷‍♂️

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