Paths To Making GOOD Money As A Truck Driver?

Topic 30832 | Page 1

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Chris P.'s Comment
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Hello all,

I've noticed that some people are making 6 figures as truck drivers while most aren't even close. What have the people that are making 6 figures done differently?

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Hello all,

I've noticed that some people are making 6 figures as truck drivers while most aren't even close. What have the people that are making 6 figures done differently?

Some possibilities are that they started young and have a lot of experience. With that experience, they were able to get into a specialized area of trucking like heavy hauling . Or perhaps their experience allows them to be super efficient. I think the moderators on this site fit the super efficient category, which is why guys like me who are learning make it a point to read every word they post.

PackRat's Comment
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Hello all,

I've noticed that some people are making 6 figures as truck drivers while most aren't even close. What have the people that are making 6 figures done differently?

What's your source for these numbers?

Turtle's Comment
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Efficiency is certainly a part of it. One could argue that without being efficient, nothing else really matters.

When it comes to garnering those higher incomes, the whole package comes into play. Along with efficiency, you need to have a willingness to go above and beyond to get the job done. Read this article by Old School, it clearly explains the best path to a successful and lucrative trucking career.

Show me the money

Another thing to note: Keeping your safety/service record and license clean will make you more attractive to some higher paying or niche companies, should you wish to go that route somewhere down the road. Many of those companies require a spotless track record before even considering you for hire. Setting yourself up to take advantage of those opportunities as they arise is key in moving up the ranks, and moving up the pay scale.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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You won't find too many OTR company drivers pulling 6 figures, how ever it is common with linehaul drivers.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Andrey's Comment
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The math here is simple. To gross 100k+ you need to make 2k+ every week. One can drive only a limited amount of miles, I would say that 3,000 miles is very good number. Going from there all you have to do is find a company that will pay you 0.70+ cpm. With all these conditions met you will be making your six digits with no problems. If this is your priority, if course.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Bird-One's Comment
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A lot those jobs tend to be local. But you are going to being working your azz off to make that kind of money. Examples would be guys that run doubles for ltl companies like Old Dominion. Fuel haulers. I’ve heard of Trash haulers like MBI making about that much. Companies like US foods or pfg. There’s a grocery chain in the Chicagoland area where drivers are making those numbers. What’s the common theme of these jobs? All hands on work and 12 to 14 hours every day.

And you’ll probably be on nights starting out.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
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I make between 1800 and 2200 a week. I burn my 70 every week over 6 days. The 6th day is the hardest because I have to make sure I'm done in time to get my 34 hour reset in before my scheduled start time.

Bird-One's Comment
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Not to hijack the thread but where you did you end up going Banks? Been curious since you left Pepsi.

I make between 1800 and 2200 a week. I burn my 70 every week over 6 days. The 6th day is the hardest because I have to make sure I'm done in time to get my 34 hour reset in before my scheduled start time.

Pacific Pearl's Comment
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Early on, I identified what I did and didn't like about the job. Fortunately, "driving a truck" is a large, inclusive job description. You want to be home every night? You want weekends off? You want to drive 70 hours a week? You want to drive days only? You want to bring your dog with you? There are jobs that can meet your needs but it's up to YOU to figure out what your needs are then find a job that's the best fit.

One of the things that really bothered me on my first job was all the unpaid time (waiting at a shipper/receiver, hunting for an empty, broke down in the middle of nowhere) so I looked for a job where I could sell 60+ hours a week and get paid for all my time. For me the answer was dedicated. I get paid by the hour (overtime over 40) and all the unpaid tasks either disappeared or are now paid.

The people making less are turning fewer miles or aren't getting paid for their time. That can because their gig just doesn't have the miles, but usually they chose another path because they wanted to bring their dog, work days, go home every night or made a choice that means they work less than 70 hours a week.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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