Trainer Shortage?

Topic 31063 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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Mikey, on a personal note, please tone down your constant negativity. I like your comments and highly respect your knowledge but please find something positive to say occasionally

There was nothing wrong with anything Mikey said, and on a personal note Bruce, it's not your place to dictate what people can or can not say around here. I don't recall ever having a problem with anything Mikey has said.

Of course, Kerry was close behind with his complaining, blaming, and criticizing right on cue.

I think it's about time for a house cleaning around here. Kerry, the next person you criticize will be your last.

Davy A.'s Comment
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Part of training is getting the trainee accustomed to living in the truck and on the road.

If you think about it, many loads require a schedule that doesn't permit finding a hotel with parking and pulling off. In fact, I regularly sleep at shippers and receivers so that I can get the next load moved quicker.

If a perspective trainee can't or won't assimilate into trucking life during training, it's probably a good indication they won't solo.

I don't have enough experience to train, nor do I want to once I do. For many reasons, personal space being one of them.

Part of the problem with current training is that it's not curriculum based, there are no standards and mile stones and it's entirely dependent on the trainers personality. If perspective trainers were taught how to teach and given a system to teach, it would help. Also, if companies were to put up driving clinics in a closed course with professional instructors periodically it would help develop and maintain performance driving habits.

I've often thought about if how the industry looks at training was changed from it's current state to a system of smaller regional runs that allows the students to come back to the terminal and park there each night, also allowing multiple trainers to coach, but it would require a standard and systemized content. Also, trainees need to be exposed to the dynamic events of parking late at night with little or none available, stress of shippers and receivers and all the random stuff we get experience on the road

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Trainers and trainees both get to sleep in their own beds or a hotel here and we still have a hard time getting trainers.

Plus for a OTR company getting drivers to a hotel everyday would be an expensive nightmare.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

RealDiehl's Comment
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I agree with the consensus here; While not having to share a truck might attract more trainers, supplying hotel rooms would probably be way too expensive. As Jamie mentioned also, it would be a huge hassle to try to find a hotel with truck parking every night.

Sharing a truck is not great. I don't think anyone actually enjoys it. Some companies compensate trainers enough to make it worth their while. I guess most people have a price they are willing to be trainers for. Others, it doesn't matter how much money you offer. They will never want to share a truck.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Bruce, I'm sorry that not all of my posts make you feel all warm and fuzzy. I see absolutely nothing negative in what I wrote.

So not only are you expecting the company to pay for the truck which has 2 beds, you expect them to pay for 2 rooms every night so you don't have to share your truck or a motel room. Also, why would it be your trainees responsibility to clean the truck each morning while you relaxed?

No, Mikey, you don’t make me feel warm and fuzzy and I’m not expecting that. Just cut the constant ball busting. Is that too much to ask? And yes, part of training is cleaning the truck. I had to do it in training, did you hire someone to do it for you? I don’t want to get sideways with you but your constant negativity is something I don’t like. How old are you? Maybe it’s just a matter of immaturity.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Trainers and trainees both get to sleep in their own beds or a hotel here and we still have a hard time getting trainers.

Plus for a OTR company getting drivers to a hotel everyday would be an expensive nightmare.

My company pays trainers an extra $2 an hour. Isn't enough in my opinion to entice someone into training that wouldn't otherwise be interested. I'm not sure how I'd like training to be honest. I enjoy just being by myself in the truck. We hire only experienced drivers so it's more of just teaching them the non driving tasks.

We have a few sleepers but for the most part daycabs. An overwhelming majority of our routes are within a 300 mile radius of the yard. It makes finding hotels somewhat easier hearing other guys talk about their experience at certain hotels. We have an app that shows hotels in a certain area that have truck parking. It's a pain in the rear needing to look up several hotels to see what is the best to get your 60+ foot rig into without damaging anything while also being able to get out when your break is up and the lot fills up.

By putting drivers up in a hotel where do you draw the line of what's an acceptable rate? With the corporate card we use nearly every hotel we get for about $100 including Marriott, holiday Inn, Radisson etc. We could also stay at a super 8 or Rodeway inn for around $60. Former president of the company told me in orientation stay where you want, I personally wouldn't stay at a motel 6 so it'd be BS for me to expect you to. I tend to stay at Country Inn and Suites, Holiday Inn, or Hampton Inn. In my area the LTL players like Estes frequently have their trucks parked outside some sketchy looking motels. They may mean well by putting drivers in a room but you may also have it backfire because it isn't a fancier hotel. I recall a while back Dave W. Had done an article about truckload carriers experimenting with daycabs and hotels rather than sleepers to entice drivers to work for them. I imagine it didn't work out like they'd hoped it would as that was the last I've heard of it.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Bruce, I'm sorry that not all of my posts make you feel all warm and fuzzy. I see absolutely nothing negative in what I wrote.

So not only are you expecting the company to pay for the truck which has 2 beds, you expect them to pay for 2 rooms every night so you don't have to share your truck or a motel room. Also, why would it be your trainees responsibility to clean the truck each morning while you relaxed?

double-quotes-end.png

No, Mikey, you don’t make me feel warm and fuzzy and I’m not expecting that. Just cut the constant ball busting. Is that too much to ask? And yes, part of training is cleaning the truck. I had to do it in training, did you hire someone to do it for you? I don’t want to get sideways with you but your constant negativity is something I don’t like. How old are you? Maybe it’s just a matter of immaturity.

C'mon, y'all . . . de escalate! Back to the originally scheduled programming, ~~~~~

Kearsey's 'being trained' story: Kearsey's Training Story.

Kearsey's 'being a trainer' experience & expectations: Kearsey, the trainer.

Also, I was concerned the Vax Mandate was gonna cause a 'hubbub' if only 'solo' drivers were exempt; but it looks like we may win the 'full battle.'

YaY! Have a blessed sunday; watch some NFL . . . in the SNOW! (WE are. . . LoL...)

~ Anne ~

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Ok Bruce, since you and Kerry are now feeding off each other, I'll give you the same warning. The next person you criticize will be your last.

Mikey, continue on as you always have. I have no problem with anything you've said or how you're saying it.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett, it’s your site and I respect your opinion even if I don’t always agree. When I first joined TT I had a bad attitude and was corrected by many experienced drivers. Now I hope I’m a positive asset here.

I don’t want a personal conflict with anyone here but certain people can be caustic when TT wants empathy, encouragement and education.

All my topic was suggesting was something that could be done to get more trainers in the fold.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
My company pays trainers an extra $2 an hour. Isn't enough in my opinion to entice someone into training that wouldn't otherwise be interested.

Here they pay 2 hours a day at your hourly rate so it comes out to over $60, plus you still get your mileage even if the trainee does all the driving.

As far hotels each terminal has ones they have special pricing for. If we are stuck out on the road they told me what ever is the first and safest one you can find. If they take a PO great if not we have to pay out of pocket and get reimbursed.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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