Trainer Shortage?

Topic 31063 | Page 3

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Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

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Bruce, I'm sorry that not all of my posts make you feel all warm and fuzzy. I see absolutely nothing negative in what I wrote.

So not only are you expecting the company to pay for the truck which has 2 beds, you expect them to pay for 2 rooms every night so you don't have to share your truck or a motel room. Also, why would it be your trainees responsibility to clean the truck each morning while you relaxed?

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No, Mikey, you don’t make me feel warm and fuzzy and I’m not expecting that. Just cut the constant ball busting. Is that too much to ask? And yes, part of training is cleaning the truck. I had to do it in training, did you hire someone to do it for you? I don’t want to get sideways with you but your constant negativity is something I don’t like. How old are you? Maybe it’s just a matter of immaturity.

In reply, no i didn't have to clean my trainers truck, I cleaned up after myself and he cleaned up after himself. As for your questioning my age and calling me immature, ima let you have that as I'm not gonna stoop to that level.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

At FedEx, an instructor makes a dollar more per hour and works 4 10 hour days. I consider it a major pay cut with more stress, but massive rewards (in my opinion). A trainer that's invested in your success is an asset. I got lucky with mine because the others that are there probably would've given up on me.

I wouldn't trust a student to do a pretrip on a vehicle I'm ultimately responsible for. They can do it while I supervise and observe, but there's not enough trust there to just turn them loose so I can have a continental breakfast. I also don't want to send them to clean the truck.

A student is a stranger. I don't know that they'll put forth an honest effort on a pretrip and I don't want them touching my things cleaning the truck.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mountain Matt's Comment
member avatar

This is an interesting thread (drama aside)... As I head off to company-sponsored training in a few weeks, I've been thinking a lot about how to be a good guest and an open learner in someone else's truck/home. Way down the line, I've pondered becoming a trainer, as I like teaching. And I know for many, a trucking job is a bridge to stable, reasonable employment at last, so I would like being part helping people in that way. However, the sharing a truck thing would indeed be challenging, but it does seem like part of the training, as Davy says (learning to live on the truck and on the road). Something for me to ponder down the line... I have plenty of hurdles in front of me at this point! And for a while, I will enjoy my solitude, once I get there...

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

At FedEx, an instructor makes a dollar more per hour and works 4 10 hour days. I consider it a major pay cut with more stress, but massive rewards (in my opinion). A trainer that's invested in your success is an asset. I got lucky with mine because the others that are there probably would've given up on me.

I wouldn't trust a student to do a pretrip on a vehicle I'm ultimately responsible for. They can do it while I supervise and observe, but there's not enough trust there to just turn them loose so I can have a continental breakfast. I also don't want to send them to clean the truck.

A student is a stranger. I don't know that they'll put forth an honest effort on a pretrip and I don't want them touching my things cleaning the truck.

I hadn't thought of the aspect of a trainee being a stranger before you mentioned it. It sounded pretty reasonable to me when I read the post about a trainee cleaning a trainer's truck without any supervision.

You just don't know where a person comes from when the trainee is assigned to your truck. I mean depending on the company, this person could have spent some years in prison and still have an inmate mentality. Or, this person could be a criminal who just hasn't been caught yet. If I ever reach the point where I am seen worthy of training new drivers, I definitely wouldn't want that trainee having access to my belongings while I am not there.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

This is an interesting thread (drama aside)... As I head off to company-sponsored training in a few weeks, I've been thinking a lot about how to be a good guest and an open learner in someone else's truck/home. Way down the line, I've pondered becoming a trainer, as I like teaching. And I know for many, a trucking job is a bridge to stable, reasonable employment at last, so I would like being part helping people in that way. However, the sharing a truck thing would indeed be challenging, but it does seem like part of the training, as Davy says (learning to live on the truck and on the road). Something for me to ponder down the line... I have plenty of hurdles in front of me at this point! And for a while, I will enjoy my solitude, once I get there...

Enjoy indeed, Matt!

I remember hearing from Tom (circa 2003) in training, with his 'Doogie Hauser' guy. They'd meet me at the T/S on Bellville 97 once in awhile. He was a good ole' boy, but .. so is Tom, haha! I'd bring 'em both some home cooking, et al. All was well!

WATCH Kearsey's (Rainy's) videos that I tagged above; I just did AGAIN, today. Much to be gained & garnered. That lil' lady has come a long way, and she shares.. HER training, and how she 'CONDUCTS' training. Just saying; was worth the 're watches' from me; up & along this subject!

"MY TIME WILL COME~!!" Haha! Heck, I'd just go to Prime, to HAVE her! NaeNae (from here!) is her most recent grad..and she has much to say, as well. She posted videos, also.

Look into it! Holdyour breetches on, haha! Believe, you'll be fine.

Wish Daniel B. would CHIME in!! He trained for Prime, and maybe other(s)... not sure!

Just me;

~ Anne ~

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

The new law will require 2 years experience to be a CDL instructor. That is going to cause a major shortage and one reason why some.of.these companies are bringing in a ton of students now.

Unfortunately covid job loss is bringing in people who arent really wanting to truck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Some companies sure will lose a lot of trainers.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

The new law will require 2 years experience to be a CDL instructor. That is going to cause a major shortage and one reason why some.of.these companies are bringing in a ton of students now.

Unfortunately covid job loss is bringing in people who arent really wanting to truck.

Damn this is the first I’ve heard of it, guess its a good thing I still browse occasionally

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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