My Awful Experience With Schneider National As Rookie.

Topic 31122 | Page 4

Page 4 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar
, they kept refusing repairs, and as far as me being the ******* for driving illegal, **** you, they didn't do their job,

Wow, Jessie G, did you really just tell someone that commented "Eff you"? You're a real piece of work aren't you.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Makes you wonder how the conversations with dispatch really went.

Jesse G.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm not upset about Schneider not working out, that stuff happens, I'm actually shocked at so many drivers kissing ass, I was raised every person pits their pants on the same way, one leg at a time, just seems none of your bosses ever zip up their pants after put on theirs.

Jesse you seem really upset that you didn’t have any success at Schneider. Nothing wrong with that. They weren’t a good fit for you. But don’t try and make up some story about Schneider making you run a truck that’s not legal. It’s nonsense. I ran for the Dollar Tree account and talked to other drivers on a weekly basis. There were complaints that went around but none were ever about Schneider running faulty equipment. Ever.

Jesse G.'s Comment
member avatar

So earlier it was my fault, then it was my fault again even after Schneider cleared the truck when it shouldn't have been? Do you people ever hold the right ones accountable or take the **** rolls down hill speech as law.

double-quotes-start.png

So you knowingly put yourself and the motoring public at risk because driving a truck that according to you is unsafe? All to make a bucks? Not very "professional"

Somehow China is involved?? If you rambled like this to your DM it is no wonder they let you go.

double-quotes-end.png

I smell some conspiracy theories brewing.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jesse G.'s Comment
member avatar

The stories not made up, and they did, bad shocks, broken fuel gauge, bad steering and tie rods amount other things. I don't talk bad about company policies every company does things different, but maintenance since I have a background in engineering and mechanics, I will tear a company apart over it because it's a safety issue that will get people killed. And when the maintenance staff even tells me at the facility the parts are borderline out of spec and Schneider doesn't want them replaced, then there's issues.

Jesse you seem really upset that you didn’t have any success at Schneider. Nothing wrong with that. They weren’t a good fit for you. But don’t try and make up some story about Schneider making you run a truck that’s not legal. It’s nonsense. I ran for the Dollar Tree account and talked to other drivers on a weekly basis. There were complaints that went around but none were ever about Schneider running faulty equipment. Ever.

Jesse G.'s Comment
member avatar

I think most of you are misunderstanding something about me defending him. I'm not saying Schneider is a horrible company, like I said before my great great family member worked for them when it started and loved them. Their orientation was like a little cdl refresher course with added info and training, but the reality is the company has turned to drivers being numbers and in that system people do fall through the cracks. And if right they did what most defense companies during war expanding past regular operational capacities and now some drivers will always suffer, may be at the hands of the masses, corporate structure, etc there will always be a defining line that gets drawn, and in this case it seems to be Natives of America, which would have old man Schneider rolling over in his grave to jump up and slap the **** out of people.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Folks this is a great example of several different issues. Lets not get into personal attacks please.

As has been said every company is different. Along with that every terminal within a company is different. Explains why people can and will have different experiences.

A truck with 400k on it is new in my opinion. My Pete just turned 800k. Drives better than some new ones I’ve driven. Reason is I take very good care of it and am the 3rd owner of it.

My volvo has 560k on it. I’m the 2nd owner of it. Same scenario.

The mega carriers pass trucks around all the time. Many inexperienced drivers. Causes premature problems.

The OP should in my opinion ask to get transferred to another terminal if possible before throwing the towel in. Also needs to concentrate of learning and refinning skills to be the best they can be. Too many new drivers have an over inflated opinion of their worth to a company. A good attitude and competency goes along way to getting what you want.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

My experience with Schneider wasn't always easy going, but it went pretty smoothly for the year I stayed there. My biggest problem was they never got me home for my home time on time, every besides one time. I was always 2-3 days late, because they wouldn't start sending me towards the house until the last minute although I gave them a 2-3 week notice as required. The other problem was, I was never preplanned, I would show up for my delivery, finish up and sometimes wait 1-5 hours for a new preplan, where a hand full of times, was late being picked up, because I was dispatched late. My PTAs were always pretty much on point, I was ready when I said I would be ready. So trip planning and keeping dispatch updated was not the problem with delayed preplans. Other then that, it wasn't that bad.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

I'm guessing from all that I've read..........

1st, the "Holier than thou, I know more than your tech's attitude"and bad communications with whomever, was 1 reason for termination.

2nd

Failure to obey a road sign is what got fired right after I was arguing with the load dispatcher

running a stop sign ??, was the final "nail in the coffin" for termination. They (Schneider) got their fast way out of all the future headaches.

As far as tie rods go, they are either good or bad, there is no in-between, and not that expensive either. Now if the drag link, was bent/sloppy/loose, that would cause a steering issue, rust means nothing except for lack of grease on the tie rod ends.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar
grrrrrr again bad quote.....Never had this problem before haha
Page 4 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Schneider National Advice For New Truck Drivers Company Sponsored CDL Training Dispatcher Issues Truck Driver Training Truck Maintenance
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More