My Awful Experience With Schneider National As Rookie.

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Jesse G.'s Comment
member avatar

What are we in grade school, no swearing allowed.

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, they kept refusing repairs, and as far as me being the ******* for driving illegal, **** you, they didn't do their job,

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Wow, Jessie G, did you really just tell someone that commented "Eff you"? You're a real piece of work aren't you.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
What are we in grade school, no swearing allowed.

Exactly.

Swearing is not tolerated. If you can't be adult enough and respectful enough to converse without swearing, your posts will be deleted.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

What are we in grade school, no swearing allowed.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

, they kept refusing repairs, and as far as me being the ******* for driving illegal, **** you, they didn't do their job,

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Wow, Jessie G, did you really just tell someone that commented "Eff you"? You're a real piece of work aren't you.

double-quotes-end.png

Pretty sure Mack E6 told you the same; but that's a story for another day. The mods HERE, are here to help. Not incessantly ban people.

Here's MY 2cents:

Check out the FMCSA manual . . . and throw the 'sanctions' / codes around, if they are putting you in 'bad juju' stuff:

https://csa.fmcsa.dot.gov/SafetyPlanner/MyFiles/SubSections.aspx?ch=21&sec=59&sub=109

I tried Errol V's way to get the link to work; it just doesn't. Highlight it and let 'GOOGLE' take you there; if your equipment isn't up to snuff....cite THIS on your DVIR ... and do whatever; don't haul it.

Sorry, Turtle....

~ Anne ~

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

What are we in grade school, no swearing allowed.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

, they kept refusing repairs, and as far as me being the ******* for driving illegal, **** you, they didn't do their job,

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Wow, Jessie G, did you really just tell someone that commented "Eff you"? You're a real piece of work aren't you.

double-quotes-end.png

No little boy, WE are not in grade school, there's a huge difference between being an adult who can hold a conversation including respectful disagreements amongst ourselves and a petulant child. When you start telling people to f**k off, you have crossed the line from adulthood into the realm of said petulant child. If you cannot conduct yourself in a grownup manner here i can only imagine how you were with Schneider and your DM. Grow up, we are not your mommy, we don't have to put up with childish A hole antics from a grownup manchild. At some point in life you will surely come to understand with regards to how you have problems with literally everyone and everything, everyone else is not the problem...you are.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Chris P.'s Comment
member avatar

Jesse,

I actually tried to defend you early on in this thread, but my post got deleted. Now I don't even want to defend you because you're not making much sense. Anyway, not many around these parts will sympathize with you. I have found that every company I worked for but one was all talk about safety. In action they weren't at all. The one that wasn't all talk didn't even try to pretend safety was important to them. There might be some truth to what you're saying, or maybe not. I can't tell. You should cool off either way.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
I have found that every company I worked for but one was all talk about safety. In action they weren't at all.

How many trucking companies have you worked for, Chris?

Nick W.'s Comment
member avatar

I've had some issues with Schneider myself, they micro manage their drivers on every side angle thing playing the military cover their ass game mixed with a slight mind control aspect of their company if you take a good look at the verbage and wording with quite a few things. They don't micro manage anyone else in the chain and it always seems when a driver has a legitimate complaint there's 5 guys like you people defending them. Sorry guys but I agree with him, had a truck broken nonstop for the 6 months I worked there, my family has worked there almost since the company started, it has changed considerably.

My latest 2 days with Schneider OTR...

Dropped off my last load of a 2 stop yesterday at 1200. Didnt get another preassignment so called to see whats up next...Driver leader is off Sunday so got forwarded to green bay where the off hours people are. After being on hold for 40 minutes(eating into my drive time) was told that I probably wouldnt get another assignment till the following morning so I should wait at the reciever. I said theres no Idling allowed here and its 96 degrees out so Im going to go to the nearest drop yard for the night. I end the day with 136 miles and 7.5 hours on duty(3 hours driving). The following morning 08/01/22 at 0500 I recieve a preassignment alert. The assignment is to drive 430 miles picking up in Modesto CA and delivering to San bernadino CA. The load wont be ready for pickup till 2200 that night and stop details say not to call shipper. I call the driver leader and get redirected to green bay again. Im told that they are going to find something for me to run sooner and to hold tight. Here it is 0700 with no load. This has been a very common occurence my year with this company. I can tell many other stories just like this, like my 66 mile day last week that had 3 stops in LA, or my 200 mile day a few days ago that had 2 stops with 2 hour live load and unload. A lot of the truckers on this forum are really quick to blame the drivers for not hustling and keeping the wheels turning, but I think they are unaware of the circumstances. Maybe they are owner ops or just work with good companies and cant believe it could possibly be like this. How do you keep the wheels turning as an OTR driver when you dont have loads to run or are given a 66 mile run that has 3 stops around LA with Live load/unload at each stop that take up to 2 hours?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Nick W.'s Comment
member avatar

I think most of you are misunderstanding something about me defending him. I'm not saying Schneider is a horrible company, like I said before my great great family member worked for them when it started and loved them. Their orientation was like a little cdl refresher course with added info and training, but the reality is the company has turned to drivers being numbers and in that system people do fall through the cracks. And if right they did what most defense companies during war expanding past regular operational capacities and now some drivers will always suffer, may be at the hands of the masses, corporate structure, etc there will always be a defining line that gets drawn, and in this case it seems to be Natives of America, which would have old man Schneider rolling over in his grave to jump up and slap the **** out of people.

Jesse, you are 100% correct. Schneider hires on 100 new drivers a week knowing that the majority will quit, but its cheaper than giving good wages. Btw Ive been sitting at the drop yard almost 24 hours without a load. Ive been talking to the other OTR drivers here and they arent getting miles either. When I talk to my driver leader, with whom im bery polite and proffessional with(so im not blamed as being an a$$), im told loads are light so hold tight. Loads have been light since I started OTR! Guess theres too many mouths to feed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Schneider hires on 100 new drivers a week knowing that the majority will quit, but its cheaper than giving good wages

Quick question here from a business owner. Why would I pay someone a high wage if they're brand new to trucking? I know they will not be productive for quite a while because they're just learning their trade. I know they're the riskiest drivers on the road, they're completely unproven, and there's a huge chance they'll quit soon, anyway.

Wouldn't it make more sense from a business standpoint to let the good ones prove themselves first and then pay them a good wage based on their level of productivity?

If I paid everyone good wages from day one, would I be able to afford consistent raises to keep my best drivers around, or would I lose many of them because I can't afford consistent raises?

I know in today's world they teach young people to expect rewards all the time just for breathing, but as a business owner, if you reward unproven and unproductive people, you'll take away any incentive they have to become more productive and you'll go broke in a month because you're overpaying their level of productivity.

You need productivity to survive, and brand new drivers can't produce at a high level. So in the beginning you earn less and work your way up the pay scale as you become more productive. I know that's probably a foreign concept to younger people, but they'll understand why it's so critical if they ever decide to run a business.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I've had some issues with Schneider myself, they micro manage their drivers on every side angle thing playing the military cover their ass game mixed with a slight mind control aspect of their company if you take a good look at the verbage and wording with quite a few things. They don't micro manage anyone else in the chain and it always seems when a driver has a legitimate complaint there's 5 guys like you people defending them. Sorry guys but I agree with him, had a truck broken nonstop for the 6 months I worked there, my family has worked there almost since the company started, it has changed considerably.

double-quotes-end.png

My latest 2 days with Schneider OTR...

Dropped off my last load of a 2 stop yesterday at 1200. Didnt get another preassignment so called to see whats up next...Driver leader is off Sunday so got forwarded to green bay where the off hours people are. After being on hold for 40 minutes(eating into my drive time) was told that I probably wouldnt get another assignment till the following morning so I should wait at the reciever. I said theres no Idling allowed here and its 96 degrees out so Im going to go to the nearest drop yard for the night. I end the day with 136 miles and 7.5 hours on duty(3 hours driving). The following morning 08/01/22 at 0500 I recieve a preassignment alert. The assignment is to drive 430 miles picking up in Modesto CA and delivering to San bernadino CA. The load wont be ready for pickup till 2200 that night and stop details say not to call shipper. I call the driver leader and get redirected to green bay again. Im told that they are going to find something for me to run sooner and to hold tight. Here it is 0700 with no load. This has been a very common occurence my year with this company. I can tell many other stories just like this, like my 66 mile day last week that had 3 stops in LA, or my 200 mile day a few days ago that had 2 stops with 2 hour live load and unload. A lot of the truckers on this forum are really quick to blame the drivers for not hustling and keeping the wheels turning, but I think they are unaware of the circumstances. Maybe they are owner ops or just work with good companies and cant believe it could possibly be like this. How do you keep the wheels turning as an OTR driver when you dont have loads to run or are given a 66 mile run that has 3 stops around LA with Live load/unload at each stop that take up to 2 hours?

Hay, Nick;

Have things gotten any better with SNI/Schneider? Have you looked at other companies, since you've got your year in if you are so offput?

There's always this: Apply For Truck Driving Jobs!!

Not sure why you didn't stop back, after Brett (above) and PackRat said 'howdy' to ya, and all! Start a thread, introduce yourself, and .. share some stories, without bashing your company. The two threads you resurrected were quite old. You could look at some of BK (Bruce K.'s) threads, he spent time with Schneider, also.

This is what Trucking Truth is all about, good sir. Stop back; in a positive light!

~ Anne & Tom ~

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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