Wondering How/why Drivers Keep Going In The Wind?

Topic 31700 | Page 1

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Davy A.'s Comment
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It's currently 30 to 50 mph sustained winds with gusts hitting above 60 to 65 mph. I'm in Kansas. The winds are north, northwest so crosswinds for the most part. Additionally it's causing blowing dust and loss of visibility.

I anticipated this, following the weather, I snuck in a few hours of driving from 0200 to 0530 when the winds calm down a bit during that time. Towards the end of that though, even with 44k in the box, gusts we're pushing me sideways and causing very erratic behavior from the truck. Even at 45 mph or slower. I watched other guys pass me and could see them noticably having issues. A couple of them had their trailers almost diagonal and I could see it twisting.

I'm shut down for today as the gusts are expected to hit in excess of 70 mph through the afternoon. I'm watching a steady stream of trucks driving through this though. Are they oblivious to conditions or just don't care? What am I missing here? My dispatch even sent out messages that said it's recommended to shut down due to high winds.

Not that I'm going to drive in this anyway, it's just plain uncomfortable and nerve wracking, on top of it, the trailer is loaded in such a way that I have to have the tandems at the 40' mark to be balanced and legal, so a whole lot of trailer sticking out in the wind. But it baffles me. Idk, maybe I'm too cautious?

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
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Some drivers just don't get it until they're laying on their side, freight spilled all over the highway, and no job prospects.

Safety and common sense are always a solid bet.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Too many drivers think it won't be them on their side until it is too late. You might make it 999 times out of 1,000 but that 1 time could be all it takes.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

As the saying goes, better to get there late than not at all. Much of wind related decision making is based on how heavy you are loaded and how you feel as the driver. If you are scared of the way your rig is handling, get off the road to a safe place. I tend to be conservative in this area. I also observe other drivers and see if the rest stops are filled with drivers who decided to get parked and wait out the winds. I guess this is one good reason to have a CB to pick up the chatter about the wind.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

...it’s the same reason why drivers attempt precarious u-turns, speed in construction zones, drive under low over passes, text while driving and continue to operate on an expired CDL.

The word “professional” implies a level of responsibility and knowledge that is lacking with many drivers.

Call me jaded... but the stupidity is pervasive.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

It's new technology. They don't need diesel or oil. They're sail trucks. It's like boats, but for land. Instead of an engine powered speed boat, you have a sail boat and when the wind gusts are 70 MPH, you have a green speed boat.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Ever notice how so many of them are owner ops? The mega carriers tell us to shut down, but those owners feel like they have to run. Then they risk losing everything. Be safe and be smart

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

It's new technology. They don't need diesel or oil. They're sail trucks. It's like boats, but for land. Instead of an engine powered speed boat, you have a sail boat and when the wind gusts are 70 MPH, you have a green speed boat.

Haha, it’s like when PackRat told us that when he delivers, he doesn’t back into spaces. He said he drops his trailer and let’s the yard drivers park it. I bought it hook line and sinker until he made it clear he was joking. Sail boat trucks and trailers are in the same category.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I fought the wind from New Ulm, MN to Northfield, MN early this morning. Round Two just ended today in Shelby, IA at the Love's.

The Wind won today. Rematch after dark.

BK's Comment
member avatar

I fought the wind from New Ulm, MN to Northfield, MN early this morning. Round Two just ended today in Shelby, IA at the Love's.

The Wind won today. Rematch after dark.

What were the wind speeds? Did you consider shutting down?

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