Depressed And Burnt Out

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Larry T.'s Comment
member avatar

It's been a great first 9 month's being a noob trucker on the DG account. One of the top drivers, and was given a brand new truck by my boss last month.

Had a situation with a manager who basically set me back half day because she was so angry with the DC. It affected me since it made me reflect on how DG managers/employees are constantly complaining and get mad at drivers because of what the DC sends them. Setting new records money wise only gets you so far before you don't care anymore.

Other than time off anything you guys do to lift your spirits while on the road when you're down in the gutter?

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I had plenty of those encounters when I was doing p/d. "You guys always damage my stuff"..."you guys? I've never seen you before and this is my first time touching this" would usually be my response.

I was in a different position though. I was getting paid hourly and I had the option to threaten detention fees if they kept me there too long. That usually changed their tone from REEEEE to just leave.

Generally speaking, nobody has the power to make me feel like **** about myself. If I can control it or do something about it, I will. If I can't, I'll direct you to somebody that can and go on with my day. What they choose to do with that information is on them.

I've worked way worse jobs that pay a lot less. I enjoy what I do and I get paid well to do it. That's more than enough to lift my spirits.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't have that sort of exact experience, but our son Michael really got burned out with a DG account and had managers several times delay him and make him late for subsequent deliveries (i.e., a few times they didn't have adequate staffing to open back door and told him he had to wait until another employee came).

A friend once post a comment elsewhere that made me stop and think quite a bit of how people interact with one another on a daily basis. It's pretty easy to get trapped into making everyone a means to an end without regard to treating them as people, just something we expect from one another. I've been a personable guy with people I don't know and I find it interesting to try to get to know one another. You have a tough enough job as it is already but you could try starting out asking people how they are doing and find out more about them. I think both you drivers and store managers and employees just get treated as numbers often enough and it could be refreshing to them to get treated as a unique person and they might actually treat you better.

Michael had a very frustrating experience at one store, lift gate broke, had to unload milk rolltainer by hand, then manager said she didn't want it, so he loaded it back on, then DC told manager she had to take it and the manager and Michael both laughed and she helped Michael unload it again. It was a frustrating experience that ended up making them both laugh at how crazy things cay go sometimes.

While vacationing in Virginia recently I shopped at a DG and I chatted with the manager for 3-4 minutes to ask how things had been going. I told him that our son had been a dedicated DG driver before and had some interesting experiences. He said he's had a lot of problems with loads, they are a month behind in getting loads from their DC. He said he knows of two loads that were just abandoned on the highway, drivers were frustrated and just quit! This manager said it's frustrating and that he was a college graduate and said he said he would have done better getting his CDL instead.

I am involved in direct sales of products from our farm to online customers. Every year I'll get a few folks that think there is a big problem with their order and come out the gates with some complaint in an email. I always respond in a professional manner and address their concerns. I've had a few folks apologize for the way they addressed me and many of these people have become long-time friends. I have a few thousand customers and know hundreds of them very well and we treat one another like family.

I hope you can sit back and think about the interesting folks you've met, good, bad, and just different and realize that these are all things that you may reflect on some day as a big learning experience. I wish you well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

It's been a great first 9 month's being a noob trucker on the DG account. One of the top drivers, and was given a brand new truck by my boss last month.

Had a situation with a manager who basically set me back half day because she was so angry with the DC. It affected me since it made me reflect on how DG managers/employees are constantly complaining and get mad at drivers because of what the DC sends them. Setting new records money wise only gets you so far before you don't care anymore.

Other than time off anything you guys do to lift your spirits while on the road when you're down in the gutter?

Podcasts. All and/or any. If you have Sirius XM, listen to Nory in the 'twilight' hours.

Brett actually has a TON of podcasts he did, for quite a while, right on here. "The Road Home" Podcasts, by Brett Aquila

Papa Pig, if you see this; CHIME IN!! You could look up some of his posts (and YT vids!) ... he did Dollar w/Werner for quite some time. Videos here: Papa Pig / Ray Muncy on YouTube, Dollar Store~!

I hope this helps a tad bit, good sir. Tomster says chew gum, and Life Saver wintergreens, and crushed ice . . . help.

Have you considered a co'pilot (furry friend?) Look at IDMtnGal's stuff; she's got a 'Monty' dog!

Kearsey has also had a few road pets: Truckin' Along w/Kearsey!

Hang in and hang on, Larry. The above posts are ALL sage advice, as well.

Best to ya!

~ Anne & Tom ~

ps: As far as the 'suits' go ... hubby says to remind you they put their pants on ONE LEG AT A TIME, just as do 'we.' Do NOT let the 'better than thou's' intimidate you. Ever. Keep the mindset, that the socks on their dang feet, WE delivered. Don't let them make you feel 'stoopid.' Ever. I've been a trucker's coach/wife for 22 years. Still am. You. Are. Not. The. Problem.

pps: Stay professional, at all times.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Don's Comment
member avatar

There is really no reason to feel burned out because either some consignee gives you the "you guys screwed up" bs line, or someone in the supply/dispatch chain screwed up. Do you personally load the trailer cargo? Are you able to crawl up in and look at each load sheet on a pallet/bundle? I would not think so. The few times I have dealt with some yahoo that blames "you drivers" on a load that was screwed up, I have no issue reminding them that I did not load the trailer, and (if they have an issue then) complain to the Shipper who did. My job is to get cargo to them on time without damaging it." That usually shuts them up. If not, I just walk away and let dispatch know what is going on. Thankfully, the vast majority of our consignees are easy to get along with.

It's been a great first 9 month's being a noob trucker on the DG account. One of the top drivers, and was given a brand new truck by my boss last month.

Had a situation with a manager who basically set me back half day because she was so angry with the DC. It affected me since it made me reflect on how DG managers/employees are constantly complaining and get mad at drivers because of what the DC sends them. Setting new records money wise only gets you so far before you don't care anymore.

Other than time off anything you guys do to lift your spirits while on the road when you're down in the gutter?

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

BK's Comment
member avatar

Hi Larry,

It seems to me that DG drivers burn out on a regular basis. Just my observation from the comments here on TT. Have you considered moving to a different gig? I’m OTR and very happy with it. You could get a regional , dedicated job and experience a revival in your career and attitude. What are your options and are you in a position to make a move to something that will be better for you?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Honestly man it just happens from time to time and you gotta start every day trying to pull yourself into a positive attitude. Give It a few weeks and the depression should pass. If you can afford to take a little time off , take some off. Maybe ask your load planner for a few markets or pop shelf stores.

Don’t let the warehouse dictate your mood. Take pictures, and try to get more money out of the load. Sometimes you gotta psyche yourself out and fake it till you make it. I would listen to podcasts while I was unloading. At the end of the day just get the stuff off the truck. Poorly loaded or not. It comes in phases I had those managers complain and yada yada I would just grin like an idiot and get their stuff in the back room. I’m sure you’ve found out that even if they don’t like you and “call in” nothing will be done if you are a top driver. Your fm’s and load planner knows the situation out there.

I got off the account out of a personal reason and needing to be home more . I miss it and will go back when the situation presents itself. People who haven’t done it knock it. People called Me and will continue to call You crazy for doing it But the way I see it(for me) it was the best job in trucking that gave me a lot of freedom. As long as I got my deliveries done I had freedom to do pretty much what I wanted out there. Had a good truck. And once I proved myself the fm and load planner catered to me. I tried to make unloading fun and have competitions with myself on how efficient I could be.

I hope this passes for you. Making it over 9 months is no small task. It will get easier again. Good luck and stay safe out there! Check your liftgate switches and make sure it’s in time!😂

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Matthew P.'s Comment
member avatar

I read a book every day. The Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday. I would recommend it as a tool to help you manage this difficult life.

Georgia Mike's Comment
member avatar

Excuse the "language" shut down early one day ang GET THE HELL OU OF THAT TRUCK. Google events near me or things to in _________. Go see a movie go bowling ect. This career, lifestyle does not have to be prison. I just posted a picture of the General lee i saw at a car show. I got to my shutdown point early dropped my trailer at the truck stop and pc'd over there. Have fun.

Larry T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Papapig. I appreciate your thoughts and advice.

Was out 7 days home 1.5 and just got back from 6 days out. Had a nice 3400 mile and 3100 mile weeks. Great thing about being on the midwest account. back to back 4 load weeks. Sure beats 5 or 6 a week for the same money. lol.

We have 80 drivers, problem is only one dispatcher for the weekdays and the boss does the weekend dispatches. I'm super nice to my dbl, but when you're the dispatcher for 80 drivers you can't always get gravy loads(800+ mile).

3 weeks ago I just finished my 5th load on Friday and was sent my 6th of the week. Worst part of Minnesota, a dock so I couldn't watch my brand new truck for an hour. I send a text right back to her to be changed. Sorry can't do it another driver already requested. I get unprofessional and text my boss. He said can't do. Can I go home? I already did 5 freaking loads this week Im about to flip out. Hold on, Dont get mad. Of course he changes it out. DBL sends me a text minutes later. You need to tell me what areas you won't work. I'm always nice to her and only requested 3 changes in 9 months and she has rejected all of them.

Kind of a weird dynamic when your boss loves you because you work your butt off and would practically do anything for you vs a DBL who has a ton of drivers to tend to and really doesnt care what load you get.

The DG account fits me to the T. and yes the independence is great. I have no interest in food service, McClane, DG fresh, etc. Flatbed, OTR/ no touch freight. I guess I'm stuck at DG for a while. lol.

Honestly man it just happens from time to time and you gotta start every day trying to pull yourself into a positive attitude. Give It a few weeks and the depression should pass. If you can afford to take a little time off , take some off. Maybe ask your load planner for a few markets or pop shelf stores.

Don’t let the warehouse dictate your mood. Take pictures, and try to get more money out of the load. Sometimes you gotta psyche yourself out and fake it till you make it. I would listen to podcasts while I was unloading. At the end of the day just get the stuff off the truck. Poorly loaded or not. It comes in phases I had those managers complain and yada yada I would just grin like an idiot and get their stuff in the back room. I’m sure you’ve found out that even if they don’t like you and “call in” nothing will be done if you are a top driver. Your fm’s and load planner knows the situation out there.

I got off the account out of a personal reason and needing to be home more . I miss it and will go back when the situation presents itself. People who haven’t done it knock it. People called Me and will continue to call You crazy for doing it But the way I see it(for me) it was the best job in trucking that gave me a lot of freedom. As long as I got my deliveries done I had freedom to do pretty much what I wanted out there. Had a good truck. And once I proved myself the fm and load planner catered to me. I tried to make unloading fun and have competitions with myself on how efficient I could be.

I hope this passes for you. Making it over 9 months is no small task. It will get easier again. Good luck and stay safe out there! Check your liftgate switches and make sure it’s in time!😂

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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